Bloodflowers

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Bloodflowers
The Cure - Bloodflowers.jpg
Studio album by The Cure
Released15 February 2000
Recorded1998–1999 at St Catherines Court, Avon and RAK Studios, London, England
Genre
Length64:29
LabelFiction
Producer
The Cure chronology
Galore
(1997)
Bloodflowers
(2000)
Greatest Hits
(2001)

Bloodflowers is the eleventh studio album by British alternative rock band The Cure, released in February 2000.

The album is seen as a sombre return to form by critics.[1]

Release[edit]

Bloodflowers was released on 15 February 2000 by record label Fiction. No commercial singles were released from Bloodflowers, but two promotional singles were released to DJs and radio stations: "Out of This World", in January (Europe) and May (U.S.), and "Maybe Someday", in January (U.S.) and April (Europe). It was a moderate success, debuting at number 16 on the US Billboard 200 albums chart. It was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album in 2001.

Live performances[edit]

In 2002, the band performed Pornography, Disintegration, and Bloodflowers in their entirety to a Berlin audience, and released the recording on DVD in 2003, titled The Cure: Trilogy.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
Metacritic69/100[2]
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[3]
Chicago Sun-Times3/4 stars[4]
Entertainment WeeklyA−[5]
The Guardian4/5 stars[6]
Los Angeles Times2.5/4 stars[7]
NME7/10[1]
Pitchfork7.5/10[8]
Q3/5 stars[9]
Rolling Stone2.5/5 stars[10]
Uncut3/5 stars[11]

Bloodflowers received a generally favourable response from critics. Entertainment Weekly called it "one of the band's most affecting works".[5] A less favourable review came from Trouser Press, which wrote "Bloodflowers feels like a forced recreation of the earlier gloomy classics. The album sounds completely uninspired, as Smith and company go through the motions of Cure-ness."[12]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by The Cure (Smith/Gallup/Bamonte/Cooper/O'Donnell).

No.TitleLength
1."Out of This World"6:44
2."Watching Me Fall"11:13
3."Where the Birds Always Sing"5:44
4."Maybe Someday"5:04
5."Coming Up" (only on vinyl and Australian, Japanese, Colombian CD editions)6:27
6."The Last Day of Summer"5:36
7."There Is No If..."3:44
8."The Loudest Sound"5:09
9."39"7:20
10."Bloodflowers"7:31

Other tracks recorded

  1. "Possession" – was released in the Join the Dots box set.
  2. "Just Say Yes" – original version released on the Greatest Hits Demos & Rarities Microsite in 2001; rerecorded version released on the Greatest Hits CD.
  3. "You're So Happy (You Could Kill Me)!" – cover version with different music circulates P2P networks.
  4. "Heavy World" – instrumental on "Lost Flowers" demo; speculated to be released on the Bloodflowers reissue.
  5. "Everything Forever" – instrumental on the "Lost Flowers" demo; speculated to be on the Bloodflowers reissue.

Personnel[edit]

The Cure

Production

  • Paul Corkett – producer, engineer, mixing
  • Robert Smith – producer, mixing
  • Sacha Jankovich – engineer
  • Ian Cooper – mastering
  • Daryl Bamonte – project coordinator
  • Perry Bamonte – photography
  • Paul Cox – photography
  • Alex Smith – photography
  • Alexis Yraola – logo

Charts[edit]

AlbumBillboard (North America)

Year Chart Position
2000 The Billboard 200 16
Top Internet Albums 2

SinglesBillboard (North America)

Year Single Chart Position
2000 "Maybe Someday" Modern Rock Tracks 10

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
France (SNEP)[13] none 98,300 [14]*
Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[15] Gold 25,000^
United States (RIAA)[16] none 285,000[17]

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Long, April (8 February 2000). "The Cure – Bloodflowers". NME. Archived from the original on 16 August 2000. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  2. ^ "Reviews for Bloodflowers by The Cure". Metacritic. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  3. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Bloodflowers – The Cure". AllMusic. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  4. ^ Wisser, Jeff (12 March 2000). "The Cure, 'Bloodflowers' (Fiction/Elektra)". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 24 June 2017. (Subscription required (help)).
  5. ^ a b Schinder, Scott (18 February 2000). "Bloodflowers". Entertainment Weekly: 86. Archived from the original on 1 April 2007. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  6. ^ Simpson, Dave (18 February 2000). "The Cure: Bloodflowers (Fiction)". The Guardian.
  7. ^ Hochman, Steve (12 February 2000). "The Cure, 'Bloodflowers,' Elektra/Fiction". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  8. ^ Ott, Chris (15 February 2000). "The Cure: Bloodflowers". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on 18 March 2009. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  9. ^ Kane, Peter (March 2000). "Winding Down". Q (162): 102. Archived from the original on 21 November 2000. Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  10. ^ Berger, Arion (2 March 2000). "Bloodflowers". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  11. ^ Dalton, Stephen (March 2000). "Prophet of Bloom". Uncut (34): 78.
  12. ^ Grant, Steven; Robbins, Ira; Reno, Brad. "TrouserPress.com :: Cure". TrouserPress.com. Retrieved July 7, 2016.
  13. ^ "French album certifications – The cure – The Cure" (in French). Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique.
  14. ^ http://www.infodisc.fr/Ventes_Albums_Tout_Temps.php?debut=4800
  15. ^ "The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community: Awards (The cure; 'The Cure')". IFPI Switzerland. Hung Medien.
  16. ^ "American album certifications – The cure – The Cure". Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH. 
  17. ^ https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/72184/the-cure-signs-to-i-amartistdirect

External links[edit]