Blue-wattled bulbul

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Blue-wattled bulbul
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Pycnonotidae
Genus: Pycnonotus
Species: P. nieuwenhuisii
Binomial name
Pycnonotus nieuwenhuisii
(Finsch, 1901)
Pycnonotus nieuwenhuisii distribution map.png
Synonyms
  • Euptilosus nieuwenhuisii
  • Poliolophus Nieuwenhuisii

The blue-wattled bulbul (Pycnonotus nieuwenhuisii) is a disputed songbird species of the bulbul family of passerine birds. The specific epithet commemorates Dutch explorer Anton Willem Nieuwenhuis. The bird is endemic to the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

Taxonomy and systematics[edit]

The status of this rarely seen bird is not known, primarily because it is not clear whether it is in fact a distinct species, or a natural hybrid between the black-headed bulbul and the grey-bellied bulbul or other closely related bulbul. Alternate names for the blue-wattled bulbul include the Malayasian wattled bulbul, Nieuwenhuis's bulbul and wattled bulbul.

Subspecies[edit]

Two subspecies are recognized:[2]

  • P. n. inexspectatus - (Chasen, 1939): Found on Sumatra
  • P. n. nieuwenhuisii - (Finsch, 1901): Found on Borneo

Status[edit]

It may be threatened by habitat loss but is only known from two specimens collected in 1900 and 1937, and few observations. Five sightings of the blue-wattled bulbul were recorded in Batu Apoi Forest Reserve in 1992.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2017). "Pycnonotus nieuwenhuisii". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2017: e.T22712705A110040705. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-1.RLTS.T22712705A110040705.en. Retrieved 13 January 2018. 
  2. ^ "Bulbuls « IOC World Bird List". www.worldbirdnames.org. Retrieved 2017-03-28. 
  3. ^ Collar, N.J. (2014). "Blue-wattled Bulbul Pycnonotus nieuwenhuisii and Black-browed Babbler Malacocincla perspicillata: two Sundaic passerines in search of a life" (PDF). BirdingASIA. 21: 37–44.