Blues Busters (film)

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Blues Busters
Blues Busters (1950 film).jpg
Theatrical poster
Directed by William Beaudine
Produced by Jan Grippo
Written by Charles Marion
Bert Lawrence
Starring Leo Gorcey
Huntz Hall
Gabriel Dell
David Gorcey
William Benedict
Music by Edward J. Kay
Cinematography Marcel LePicard
Edited by William Austin
Distributed by Monogram Pictures
Release date
  • October 29, 1950 (1950-10-29)
Running time
67 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Blues Busters is a 1950 comedy film starring The Bowery Boys. The film was released on October 29, 1950 by Monogram Pictures and is the twentieth film in the series.

Plot[edit]

Sach develops an uncanny ability to sing, after having his tonsils removed, and Slip convinces Louie to turn his sweet shop into a night club, The Bowery Palace, after unsuccessfully trying to get Sach a singing job at a neighboring club, The Rio Cabana.

After Sach's singing makes him a star, Rick Martin (Craig Stevens), the owner of the now-rival club, tries to hire him away but is unsuccessful. Rick gets his lady friend, Lola (Adele Jergens), to get Sach to sign a contract with him, using the pretense that she is asking for his autograph. Rick then goes after the Bowery Palace's other star, Sally Dolan (Phyllis Coates). She, however, does not want to go because Rick is after more than just her singing talent. She tips off Lola about what Rick is up to and Lola agrees to testify that Sach's signature was just an autograph and not a signed contract, thereby allowing him to return to the Bowery Palace. However, by this time Sach has gone to a doctor to help cure the "tickle in his throat' and he has lost the ability to sing.

Production[edit]

The working title of this film was The Bowery Thrush.[citation needed] This is the last Bowery Boys film with Gabriel Dell. Tired of taking a back seat to co-stars Leo Gorcey and Huntz Hall,[citation needed] he decided to quit the series. After leaving the group, he and Huntz Hall formed a nightclub act called "Hall and Dell", in which the two performed classic vaudeville routines. Dell played straight man to Hall.

Home media[edit]

The film was released twice on home media, first on VHS by Warner Brothers on September 1, 1998 and then Warner Archives released the film on made-to-order DVD in the United States as part of "The Bowery Boys, Volume One" on November 23, 2012.

Cast[edit]

The Bowery Boys[edit]

Remaining cast[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

  • "Wasn't It You?"
    • Written by Ben Raleigh and Bernie Wayne
    • Played on a radio and sung by Huntz Hall (dubbed by John Laurenz)
  • "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho"
    • Traditional spiritual
    • Sung by Adele Jergens in a nightclub (dubbed by Gloria Wood)
  • "Bluebirds Keep Singin' in the Rain"
    • Written by Johnny Lange and Eliot Daniel
    • Published by Bulls Eye Music Inc. (ASCAP)
    • Played on piano by Gabriel Dell
    • Sung by Huntz Hall (dubbed by John Laurenz)
    • Reprised by Huntz Hall in the nightclub (dubbed by John Laurenz)
  • "Let's Have a Heart to Heart Talk"
    • Written by Billy Austin, Edward Brandt and Paul Landers
    • Played on piano by Gabriel Dell
    • Sung by Huntz Hall (dubbed by John Laurenz)
    • Reprised by Huntz Hall in the nightclub (dubbed by John Laurenz)
  • "You Walk By"
    • ritten by Ben Raleigh and Bernie Wayne
    • Played by the orchestra with Gabriel Dell on piano
    • Sung by Huntz Hall (dubbed by John Laurenz)
  • "Better Be Lookin' Out for Love"
    • Written by Ralph Wolf and Johnny Lange
    • Sung by Adele Jergens in a nightclub (dubbed by Gloria Wood)
  • "Swanee River"
    • Written by Stephen Foster (as Stephen Collins Foster)
    • Jazzy version played by Gabriel Dell on piano
    • Danced to by William 'Billy' Benedict, David Gorcey and Buddy Gorman
  • "Dixie's Lan"
    • Written by Daniel Decatur Emmett
    • Sung by Leo Gorcey

According to a July 3, 1950 The Hollywood Reporter news item, singer Bob Carroll was the singing double for Huntz Hall, but reviews credit John Laurenz as his singing double. Carroll's participation in the final film has not been confirmed.[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Triple Trouble
1950
'The Bowery Boys' movies
1946-1958
Succeeded by
Bowery Battalion
1951