Bo Weavil Jackson

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Bo Weavil Jackson (dates and places of birth and death unknown, real name said to be James Butler), was an African-American blues singer and guitarist.[1] He was one of the first country bluesmen to be recorded, in 1926, for Paramount Records and Vocalion Records. On the latter label he was credited as Sam Butler, which has become the name most commonly used to identify him.[2] His 78-rpm records are highly sought by collectors and have been re-released on numerous LP and CD compilation albums. His technique is distinctive for its upbeat tempo, varied melodic lines, and impromptu instrumentals.[3]

It is widely believed that Jackson was active in Birmingham, Alabama, because he referred to that area in his lyrics and because that was apparently where the talent scouts found him performing on the street, but he was promoted as originating from North Carolina. According to Eugene Chadbourne, Paramount promoted him as having "come down from the Carolinas". Apart from his 1926 recordings, no further documentation of him exists.[2]

His recordings have been published in both notation and tablature transcriptions, which have enabled contemporary detailed study of his style and technique.[2]

Recordings[edit]

As Bo Weavil Jackson, circa September 1926, in Chicago, Illinois[1][4]
As Sam Butler, September 30, 1926, in New York City[1][14]
  • "You Can't Keep No Brown" / "Devil and My Brown Blues",[15][16] Vocalion 1055 (unreleased)
  • "Heaven Is My View"[17] / "Christians Fight On (Your Time Ain't Long)",[18][19] Vocalion 1056
  • "Poor Boy Blues"[20] / "Jefferson County Blues",[21] Vocalion 1057

Compilations[edit]

  • Bo Weavil Jackson (Sam Butler) 1926, Complete Recordings in Chronological Order (Matchbox, 1982)
  • Backwoods Blues (1926–1935): The Complete Recorded Works in Chronological Order of Sam Butler (Bo Weavil Jackson), Bobby Grant, King Solomon Hill, Lane Hardin (Document, 1991)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Sam Butler/Bo Weavil Jackson discography". wirz.de. Retrieved September 13, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c Chadbourne, Eugene. Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  3. ^ R. Crumb (2014). "R. Crumb's Heroes of Blues, Jazz & Country". Harry N. Abrams. p. 44. 
  4. ^ "Paramoung 12000 series numerical listing (1922–1927)". www.78discography.com. Retrieved September 13, 2015. 
  5. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – You Can't Keep No Brown, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  6. ^ Roll & Tumble Blues – You Cant Keep No Brown – Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  7. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – You Can' Keep No Brown Test at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  8. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – You Can't Keep No Brown Down at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  9. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Pistol Blues, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  10. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – When the Saints Go Marching In, composed by traditional at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  11. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – I'm on My Way to the Kingdom Land at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  12. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Why Do You Moan?, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  13. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic
  14. ^ "1000–1500 (1926–1930)". 78discography.com. Retrieved September 13, 2015. 
  15. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Devil and My Brown Blues Test at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  16. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Devil and My Brown Blues, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  17. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Heaven Is My View, composed by traditional at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  18. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Christians Fight on, Your Time Ain't Long at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  19. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Christians Fight On, Your Time Has Come, composed by traditional at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  20. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Poor Boy Blues, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  21. ^ Bo Weavil Jackson – Jefferson County Blues, composed by Bo Weavil Jackson at AllMusic. Retrieved September 13, 2015.