Board of Studies

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This article is about the former education board in NSW. For the current education board, see Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards.
Board of Studies NSW
BOS NSW logo.png
Abbreviation BOS
Successor Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards
Formation 1990
Extinction 2013
Type Government agency
Headquarters Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Location
  • 117 Clarence Street, Sydney
Coordinates 33°52′01″S 151°12′18″E / 33.867039°S 151.204965°E / -33.867039; 151.204965Coordinates: 33°52′01″S 151°12′18″E / 33.867039°S 151.204965°E / -33.867039; 151.204965
Region served
New South Wales, Australia
President
Tom Alegounarias
Chief Executive
Carol Taylor
Budget
$110 million
Staff
210
Website boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au

The Board of Studies was the state government education board in New South Wales, Australia from 1990 to 2013. It provided educational leadership by developing the curriculum from Kindergarten to Year 12 and awarding the secondary school credentials Record of School Achievement and Higher School Certificate.

The Board of Studies amalgamated with the NSW Institute of Teachers on 1 January 2014 to form the Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES).

Presidents of the Board of Studies[edit]

  • Tom Alegounarias (2009–2013)[1]
  • Gordon Stanley (1998–2008)[2]
  • Sam Weller (1994–1997)[3]
  • John Lambert (1990–1994)[4] (deceased)[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Parker, Maralyn (13 May 2009). "Over one year late a new president for the NSW Board of Studies". news.com.au. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  2. ^ Patty, Anna (3 March 2008). "Taking standards overseas". smh.com.au. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  3. ^ "Board members". boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. 1997. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  4. ^ "Proposed Board Of Studies Inquiry". parliament.nsw.gov.au. 10 March 1994. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "Death of John Lambert: Tuesday 2 December 2014". news.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  6. ^ "Hundreds farewell ‘champion of Christian education’". sydneyanglicans.net. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 

External links[edit]