Bob Glenn

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Bob Glenn
Burdette Glenn (1918).jpg
Glenn at Michigan, 1918
Pitcher
Born: (1894-06-16)June 16, 1894
West Sunbury, Pennsylvania
Died: June 3, 1977(1977-06-03) (aged 82)
Richmond, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 27, 1920, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
August 17, 1920, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Games played 2
Innings pitched 2
Earned runs 0
Teams

Burdette "Bob" Glenn (June 16, 1894 – June 3, 1977) was an American baseball player and pioneer in the field of highway engineering.

Glenn played college baseball at the University of Michigan in 1917 and 1918 and appeared in two games as a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals in 1920, compiling a career earned run average of 0.00 in his brief career in Major League Baseball.

Glenn later was later employed as an instructor and professor of civil and highway engineering at Oregon State Agricultural College for over 25 years. In the late 1940s, he became one of the earlier staff members at the Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, where he remained until his retirement in the 1960s.

Early years[edit]

Glenn was born in West Sunbury, Pennsylvania, in 1894.[1] His parents were Horace Glenn and Ida Glenn. At the time of the 1910 U.S. Census, Glenn was living in Washington Township, Pennsylvania, with his parents and two older sisters. His father was employed as a general farmer.[2] He later listed his home town as Tarentum, Pennsylvania.[3] Glenn began his college education at Grove College.[4]

University of Michigan[edit]

Glenn attended the University of Michigan and received a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering. He also served as an instructor in surveying at Michigan from 1918 to 1919.[5]

While attending Michigan, Glenn played college baseball for the Michigan Wolverines baseball team in 1917 and 1918 and was the captain of the 1918 team.[6][7] While attending Michigan, he was also a member of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, Griffins, Vulcans, Webb and Flange, Round-Up Club, and Keystone Club.[3]

Professional baseball[edit]

Glenn signed with the St. Louis Cardinals. In April 1920, the Milwaukee baseball club announced that it had purchased Glenn from the Cardinals.[8] Glenn either remained with or returned to the Cardinals in 1920. He appeared in two Major League Baseball games for the Cardinals on July 27, 1920, and August 17, 1920. Both appearances were as a relief pitcher. Enzenroth pitched two innings, allowed two hits and no runs, and compiled a career earned run average of 0.00. He had no at bats.[1]

Highway engineering career[edit]

In 1919, after graduating from Michigan, Glenn was hired as an instructor in civil engineering at the Engineering School of the Oregon State Agricultural College (now known as Oregon State University) in Corvallis, Oregon.[9][10] From 1922 to 1934, Glenn was an assistant professor of civil engineering at Oregon State.[4][11][12] In 1934, Glenn became an associate professor, and in 1936, he was listed as an associate professor in the field of "highway engineering" at Oregon State.[12] While at Oregon State, Glenn's publications included "Highway and Traffic Engineering Literature: A Classified Bibliography of Periodical Literature Covering the Period 1920-1939" (1940) and "A Report on the Efficiency of the Present Highway Systems as it Affects the Logging Industry" (1947).[13][14]

In the late 1940s, Glenn left Oregon State to become one of the earlier staff members at the Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering ("ITTE") at the University of California, Berkeley.[15] While associated with the ITTE, Glenn's publications included "Working for Progress in Highway Engineering" (1954), "County Road Organization and Administration in California" (1955), and "An Inventory of Traffic Engineering Activities in California Cities" (1959).[16][17][18]

Family and later years[edit]

In June 1922, Glenn was married to Evelyn Fulkerson in Benton County, Oregon.[19]

In June 1977, Glenn died at Richmond, California, at age 82.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Bob Glenn Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved June 9, 2012. 
  2. ^ Census entry for Burdette Glenn, age 15. Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Washington, Butler, Pennsylvania; Roll: T624_1322; Page: 16B; Enumeration District: 0106; Image: 407; FHL microfilm: 1375335.
  3. ^ a b 1919 Michiganensian, p. 331.
  4. ^ a b General Catalogue, 1923-24 (PDF). Oregon Agricultural College. 1923. p. 13. 
  5. ^ "History of the Department of Civil Engineering". University of Michigan. June 9, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Parks To Open for Michigan in Case Games: "Bob" Glenn and "Nick" Scheidler Are Expected to Work Three Innings Each". Detroit Free Press. April 19, 1919. p. 14. 
  7. ^ "Michigan Baseball Captains". mgoblue.com (University of Michigan official site). 
  8. ^ "Locals Purchase Cardinal Pitcher". April 11, 1920. 
  9. ^ Engineering Education, vol. 12. American Society for Engineering Education. 1921. p. 203. 
  10. ^ Oregon State University - Beaver Yearbook, 1921, p. 46.
  11. ^ General Catalogue, 1931-32, Oregon State Agricultural College (PDF). Oregon State Agricultural College. 1931. p. 24. 
  12. ^ a b Catalogue, 1936-37, Oregon State Agricultural College (PDF). Oregon State Agricultural College. 1936. 
  13. ^ Bob Glenn (1940). Highway and Traffic Engineering Literature: A Classified Bibliography of Periodical Literature Covering the Period 1920-1939. 
  14. ^ John Stephen Worley, Bob Glenn (1947). A Report on the Efficiency of the Present Highway Systems as it Affects the Logging Industry. Pacific Logging Congress. 
  15. ^ "Oral History, Harmer Elmer Davis, Founder of the Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering". 1997. 
  16. ^ Bob Glenn (1954). Working for Progress in Highway Engineering. Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering. 
  17. ^ Bob Glenn. County Road Organization and Administration in California. Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering. 
  18. ^ Wolfgang S. Homburger, Bob Glenn (1959). An Inventory of Traffic Engineering Activities in California Cities. Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering, University of California. 
  19. ^ Ancestry.com. Marriage Record for Evelyn Fulkerson. Spouse: Burdette Glenn. Date: 12 Jun 1922. Source: Book 8,Page 628b. County and State: Benton County, Oregon.

External links[edit]