Bob Hudson (singer)

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Bob Hudson
Origin Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
Genres country/folk, comedy
Occupation(s) radio presenter; archeologist
Years active 1974–1980
Associated acts Margret RoadKnight

Robert "Bob" Hudson is an Australian singer and radio presenter, his satirical narrative, "The Newcastle Song" topped the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart for four weeks in 1975.[1][2][3] The single version was an edit of the ten-minute live recording from the related album, Newcastle Song.[1] His album track, "Girls in Our Town", was a Top 40 single for country singer Margret RoadKnight.[1]

"The Newcastle Song" topped the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart for four weeks in 1975.[1][3] The single version was an edit of the ten-minute live recording from the related album, Newcastle Song.[1] With producer, Chris Neal, he co-wrote the response song, "Rak off Normie" which was recorded by Maureen Elkner for her top ten hit.[4][1][3] His album track, "Girls in Our Town", was a Top 40 single for country singer Margret RoadKnight;[1][3] Hudson and RoadKnight toured together.[1] Other albums by Hudson are After Me Cat Left Home (1975) and Party Pieces (1980).[1]

Initially, Bob was school teacher and solo folk/comic singer in the late 1960s.

He was lead singer in the Electric Jug Band that played to the packed back bar of the Star Hotel in Newcastle on Saturday afternoons through the early 1970s.[5]

Hudson was one of the original on-air team at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) rock radio station 2JJ (Double Jay, now Triple J) in 1975,[6][1] and later worked for 2BL, presenting Music Buffs' Talk Back Show with Glenn A. Baker, and on ABC radio's international news desk.[7]

In the 1980s he was involved in the publishing of a book about Australian language [8]

Hudson completed a PhD in Archaeology at the University of Sydney and conducts research on ancient Myanmar (Burma).[citation needed]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j McFarlane (1999). Encyclopedia entry for 'Bob Hudson'. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  2. ^ Spencer et al., (2007) HUDSON, Bob[permanent dead link] entry. Retrieved 30 January 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book Ltd. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.  NOTE: Used for Australian Singles and Albums charting from 1974 until ARIA created their own charts in mid-1988. In 1992, Kent back calculated chart positions for 1970–1974.
  4. ^ Hudson, Bob; Neal, Chris (1975), Rak off, Normie!, Leeds Music, retrieved 9 February 2017 
  5. ^ "FZOMP (NEE THARUNKA-XL5) INTERVIEWS BOISTROUS BOB: BOB HUDSON". Tharunka. 19, (25/26). New South Wales, Australia. 8 November 1973. p. 23. Retrieved 9 February 2017 – via National Library of Australia. 
  6. ^ Page 110 with portrait Veitch, Alan; Veitch, Alan; Atterton, Margot (1984), The Illustrated encyclopaedia of Australian showbiz (1st ed.), Sunshine Books, ISBN 978-0-86777-057-5 
  7. ^ Baker, Glenn A., 1952-; Hudson, Bob (1986), Bob Hudson & Glenn A. Baker present antipodean atrocities : dubious ditties, patriotic pap and enthusiastic excesses that made Australia [great] grate, ABC Records, retrieved 9 February 2017 
  8. ^ Hudson, Bob; Pickering, Larry (1987), The first Australian dictionary of vulgarities & obscenities, David & Charles, ISBN 978-0-7153-9054-2 
  9. ^ "Who's who of Australian rock / compiled by Chris Spencer, Zbig Nowara & Paul McHenry". catalogue. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 4 January 2010.