Bob Hugin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Bob Hugin
Robert J. Hugin.gif
Personal details
Born
Robert John Hugin

1954/1955 (age 63–64)
Jersey City, New Jersey, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Kathy
Children3
EducationPrinceton University (BA)
University of Virginia (MBA)
Military service
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Years of service1976–1983 (active duty)
1983–1990 (reserve duty)

Robert John Hugin (July 23, 1954)[1][2] is an American businessman who was formerly the executive chairman of Celgene, a biopharmaceutical company.[3][4] Hugin was the Republican nominee in the 2018 United States Senate election in New Jersey, where he was defeated by incumbent Democratic Senator Bob Menendez.[5][6]

Education and military service[edit]

Hugin grew up in Union City, New Jersey.[7] He was the first in his family to attend college, earning a full-scholarship to Princeton University.[8] He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Princeton University in 1976. After graduating, Hugin served in the United States Marine Corps as an active duty infantry officer from 1976 to 1983.[9] In 1985, Hugin earned a Master's Degree in Business Administration from the University of Virginia.[10]

At Princeton, Hugin was president of the male-only Tiger Inn, one of the most prominent private eating clubs on campus.[citation needed] As president, he opposed the membership of gay men in 1976, stating that a member discovered to be gay "wouldn't last long."[11] Years later, as a member of the alumni board, he also led the club's opposition to a 13-year legal campaign during the 1980s and 1990s to require the club to admit women, comparing the campaign to "fascism."[12] In 2018, he said that his views on these issues had since changed.[13]

Career[edit]

From 1985 to 1999, Hugin worked at J.P. Morgan & Co. Inc. and was a managing director.[14]

Hugin has been credited with saving the biotech corporation Celgene and turning it profitable.[6] He joined the company in June 1999 as senior vice president and CFO. At the time, Celgene had approximately 200 employees and less than six weeks of cash.[15] He was elected to Celgene's board of directors in December 2001. Hugin served as Celgene's president and COO since May 2006, and became the CEO of Celgene in June 2010. In June 2011, he was elected chairman of the Celgene board of directors.[4] In his time at Celgene the market capitalization of the company went from $100 million to $70 billion, and headcount grew to 6,000.[8]

During Hugin's tenure, Celgene was reprimanded multiple times by the U.S Food and Drug Administration, including a formal warning letter in 2000 for not sharing all the risks associated with their drugs, and for marketing their drug Thalomid and others to doctors for unapproved uses. In 2017, Celgene was forced to pay $280 million in response to a lawsuit regarding these practices.[6] Hugin has been criticized for drastically raising the prices of several drugs while he was in charge of Celgene.[6][16] For example, in 2006, the drug Revlimid was introduced to the market and cost about $6,000 for a one-month supply. Celgene was able to actively prevent generic versions of the drug from being sold, and by the year 2017, the price for the same amount of Revlimid had been raised by Celgene to over $16,000.[6]

In 2013, Hugin was named the best CEO in biotech by TheStreet.com.[17] He left his position at Celgene as chief executive and became an executive chairman in 2017.[6]

2018 U.S. Senate election[edit]

On February 13, 2018, Hugin announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate in New Jersey.[18] In the first quarter of 2018, his campaign raised a little under $8 million, of which $7.5 million was a loan from Hugin himself.[19] He defeated Brian Goldberg in the Republican primary that took place on June 5, 2018, by garnering 75% of the vote, to Goldberg's 24%.[20] President Donald Trump endorsed Hugin via Twitter on Election Day.[21]

Hugin lost the general election on November 6 against the incumbent Democratic Senator Bob Menendez by almost ten percentage points.[22]

Political positions[edit]

On his 2018 campaign website for the U.S. Senate seat in New Jersey, Hugin described himself as a "different kind of Republican", "moderate" and "independent".[23][24] He advertises his support for legal abortion and gay marriage.[25] On social issues, Hugin is more socially liberal than most Republicans.[26]

Abortion[edit]

Hugin announced that he is pro-choice on abortion and supports same-sex marriage in a campaign ad. After announcing that he supports legal abortion, Hugin "lost the support of New Jersey Right to Life, the state’s largest pro-life group."[27] Hugin opposes late term abortions unless the life of the mother is at risk.[28] He supported the nomination of Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch and has said he would support similarly conservative judicial Supreme Court candidates, causing some to question whether he would be proactive about defending abortion rights.[28][29]

Healthcare[edit]

Hugin would like to keep parts of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. He would also like to limit out-of-pocket payments including prescription co-payments.[30]

Immigration[edit]

He opposed the Trump administration family separation policy, and announced that he supports a pathway to citizenship for some undocumented immigrants.[31]

LGBT rights[edit]

Hugin used to oppose gay marriage and gay rights, including advocating against extending non-discrimination rights to LGBT students at Princeton.[32][33] He has since changed his stance and now fully supports the right of LGBT people to get married.[33]

Taxes[edit]

Hugin "calls himself a fiscal conservative opposed to tax increases in a state with the highest property taxes."[34] He supports making individual tax cuts permanent,[35] and also opposes the cap on the state and local tax (SALT) deduction imposed by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, saying that it is too low.[36]

Trump[edit]

Hugin supported Donald Trump's presidential candidacy, was the finance chairman of Trump's New Jersey campaign, and donated $100,000 in 2016 to the Trump Victory Fund to help get Trump elected.[37][38] Hugin also acted as a delegate supporting Trump's nomination at the 2016 Republican National Convention.[37][39] He has since said that some of Trump's policies are hurting businesses.[38]

Personal life[edit]

Bob Hugin is married to Kathy Hugin. They have three children. Hugin is a member of the United Methodist Church.[40] He and his wife earned more than $34 million between 2015 and 2016.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Friedman, Matt (June 6, 2018). "Menendez vs. Hugin: 'Corrupt' senator vs. 'greedy' pharmaceutical exec". Politico. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  2. ^ "Hilary Hugin on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 2018-11-27.
  3. ^ "Ex-Drug CEO Seeking Senate Seat Attacked by Old Industry Foe". Bloomberg. Bloomberg. Archived from the original on November 3, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Management - Celgene Corporation". Celgene. Archived from the original on April 16, 2016. Retrieved April 20, 2016.
  5. ^ Washington Times. "Menendez, Hugin to fight for U.S. Senate seat in New Jersey". Archived from the original on July 19, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "A G.O.P. Senate Candidate Highlights His Drug Industry Career. Should He?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  7. ^ Pramuk, Jacob (June 6, 2018). "GOP ex-drug CEO hopes centrism and New Jersey roots will help him beat Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez". CNBC. Archived from the original on October 19, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Bob Hugin Announces GOP Candidacy for the U.S. Senate at Springfield Elk's Club". TAPinto. Archived from the original on October 19, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  9. ^ "Hall of Fame: Bob Hugin". njbiz.com. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  10. ^ "Robert J. Hugin". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 19, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  11. ^ Pugliese, Nicholas (September 21, 2018). "NJ election 2018: Menendez attacks Hugin for past stances on women, gays at Princeton". Northjersey.com. Archived from the original on November 24, 2018. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  12. ^ Pugliese, Nicholas (September 21, 2018). "NJ election 2018: Menendez attacks Hugin for past stances on women, gays at Princeton". Northjersey.com. Archived from the original on November 24, 2018. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  13. ^ Friedman, Matt (July 20, 2018). "Menendez jumps on Hugin's past opposition to allowing women, gays into elite Princeton club". Politico. Archived from the original on July 20, 2018. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  14. ^ "Robert J. Hugin". Business Week. Retrieved October 29, 2014.
  15. ^ "A G.O.P. Senate Candidate Highlights His Drug Industry Career. Should He?". Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  16. ^ "Republicans suddenly see an opening in an unlikely state's Senate race, but Democrats remain confident". Business Insider. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  17. ^ Feuerstein, Adam (December 11, 2013). "The Best Biotech CEO of 2013 is..." thestreet.com. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  18. ^ "A Former Pharmaceutical Executive Is Running for U.S. Senate in New Jersey". New York Times. Archived from the original on February 13, 2018. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  19. ^ Friedman, Matt (April 9, 2018). "Hugin puts $7.5M of his own money into campaign". Politico. Archived from the original on June 24, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  20. ^ New York Times. "New Jersey Primary Election Results". Archived from the original on June 7, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2018.
  21. ^ Donald Trump. "Bob Hugin, successful all of his life, would be a Great Senator from New Jersey. He has my complete and total Endorsement! Get out and Vote for Bob". Twitter. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  22. ^ Corasaniti, Nick (November 7, 2018). "Bob Menendez Wins Senate Race in N.J., Beating Back a Challenge From Hugin". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  23. ^ "Bob Hugin for Senate". Bob Hugin for Senate. Archived from the original on June 26, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  24. ^ "Senate split: Bob Hugin says he'd vote for Brett Kavanaugh after Bob Menendez votes 'no'". North Jersey. Retrieved 2018-10-08.
  25. ^ "NJ Senate candidate Bob Hugin doesn't just support abortion, gay rights— he advertises it". NorthJersey.com. June 14, 2018. Retrieved July 7, 2018.
  26. ^ "Hugin risks alienating Trump voters by courting Dems - New Jersey Globe". New Jersey Globe. June 14, 2018. Archived from the original on June 26, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  27. ^ "Hugin's pro-choice stance leaves abortion opponents in a lurch - New Jersey Globe". New Jersey Globe. June 15, 2018. Archived from the original on June 26, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  28. ^ a b "Ex-rival vouches for Hugin's pro-life credentials - New Jersey Globe". New Jersey Globe. February 16, 2018. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  29. ^ "How Brett Kavanaugh's sex assault allegation is trouble for Republican in NJ Senate race". North Jersey. Archived from the original on November 23, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  30. ^ "Is There Anything More to New Jersey's U.S. Senate Race than Negative Ads? - NJ Spotlight". www.njspotlight.com. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  31. ^ "After criticism, GOP Senate candidate Hugin calls for end to separating children at border". North Jersey. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  32. ^ "Menendez Rips Bob Hugin For Alleged 'Anti-Gay, Anti-Woman' Past". Hoboken, NJ Patch. 2018-07-20. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  33. ^ a b "Menendez ties Republican Senate foe to Trump's record on women, LGBT rights". NJ.com. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  34. ^ "Menendez's Republican challenger: 'I'm offended' by senator's actions". NJ.com. Archived from the original on June 26, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  35. ^ "Bob Hugin's Issue Positions (Political Courage Test)". votesmart.org. Archived from the original on June 26, 2018.
  36. ^ Matt Friedman (February 13, 2018). "Republican Hugin launches Senate candidacy, says he's 'embarrassed' by Menendez". Politico. Archived from the original on July 2, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  37. ^ a b "NJ Senate candidate Bob Hugin doesn't just support abortion, gay rights— he advertises it". North Jersey. Retrieved 2018-10-03.
  38. ^ a b "In Trump country, Hugin distances himself from Trump". Politico PRO. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  39. ^ "NJ Senate election 2018: What you need to know about Bob Hugin and Bob Menendez". North Jersey. Retrieved 2018-10-04.
  40. ^ "NJ Senate election 2018: What you need to know about Bob Hugin and Bob Menendez". North Jersey. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  41. ^ "Likely Menendez challenger Hugin earned $34M over 2 years, tax returns show". Politico PRO. Archived from the original on October 18, 2018. Retrieved October 17, 2018.

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Joe Kyrillos
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from New Jersey
(Class 1)

2018
Most recent