Bob McDermott

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Bob McDermott
Bob McDermott.jpg
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 40th district
Assumed office
January 16, 2013
Preceded bySharon Har
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 32nd district
In office
January 1997 – January 2003
Preceded byRobert Bunda
Succeeded byLynn Finnegan
Personal details
Born (1963-08-05) August 5, 1963 (age 56)
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
ResidencePuunui, Hawaii
Alma materChaminade University of Honolulu

Bob McDermott[1] (born August 5, 1963)[2] is an American politician and a Republican member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 16, 2013 representing District 40. McDermott previously served three terms in the Hawaii House of Representatives from 1997 until 2003, but left to run to represent Hawaii's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives.

Education[edit]

McDermott is a 1981 graduate of Upper Perkiomen High School in Pennsburg, Pennsylvania. He earned his BA in economics and his MBA from Chaminade University of Honolulu.

Political views[edit]

McDermott made headlines in 2013 for his vocal opposition to same-sex marriage. It ultimately became law, and Bob McDermott turned his focus on Pono Choice, a sex education course in Hawaii. On January 8, 2014, McDermott held a press conference where he gave a presentation on "oral sex," "vaginal sex," and "anal sex."[3] The press conference gained national attention and many experts called it an "obsession with sex".[4]

2018 gubernatorial run[edit]

McDermott announced his intent to run for Governor of Hawaii in the 2018 election on May 12, 2017.[5] However he later withdrew his candidacy in August 2017.[6]

Controversies[edit]

On March 14, 2016, during a debate over the state budget, McDermott was caught yelling profanities at fellow Republicans for not volunteering time to him as he was at his limit of his allotted time. McDermott told his colleagues to "start acting like (expletive) Republicans" and "do your (expletive) job."[7]

McDermott made headlines again in March 2017 after voting Beth Fukumoto out of her position as House Minority Leader, saying that her criticisms of Donald Trump and attendance at the Women's March were only to gain publicity for herself.[8] Fukumoto then left the Republican party, citing racism and sexism within the party as her reasons for leaving.[9][10]

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 With Democratic Representative Sharon Har redistricted to District 42, McDermott was unopposed for the District 40 August 11, 2012 Republican Primary, winning with 754 votes,[11] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 3,249 votes (48.8%) against Democratic nominee Chris Manabat,[12] who had won the six-way Democratic Primary in a field which included former Representative Romy Mindo.
  • 1996 When Democratic Representative Robert Bunda ran for Hawaii Senate and left the House District 32 seat open, McDermott was unopposed for the September 21, 1996 Republican Primary, winning with 304 votes,[13] and won the November 5, 1996 General election with 2,483 votes (53.5%) against Democratic nominee Leonard Pepper.[14]
  • 1998 McDermott was unopposed for the September 19, 1998 Republican Primary, winning with 304 votes,[15] and won the November 3, 1998 General election with 2,796 votes (54.9%) against Democratic nominee Wilfred Tangonan.[16]
  • 2000 McDermott was unopposed for the September 23, 2000 Republican Primary, winning with 785 votes,[17] and won the November 7, 2000 General election with 2,686 votes (56.4%) against Democratic nominee Eddie Aguinaldo.[18]
  • 2002 Expecting to challenge incumbent Democratic United States Representative Patsy Mink for Hawaii's 2nd congressional district seat, McDermott won the September 21, 2002 Republican Primary with 20,180 votes (49.5%);[19] Mink had been hospitalized after announcing her re-election candidacy, and died the week after the primary, but too late to be replaced on the General election ballot; she was elected posthumously in the four-way November 5, 2002 General election. McDermott did not run in the November 30, 2002 Special election to succeed her in the interim, as an election to fill the remainder of her term was scheduled for January 4, 2003.
  • 2003 McDermott ran in the 91 candidate January 4, 2003 Special election to succeed Congresswoman Mink, but lost to Ed Case,[20] who had won the interim special election, and held the seat until 2007.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Representative Bob McDermott". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii State Legislature. Archived from the original on September 30, 2014. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Bob McDermott's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  3. ^ Blair, Chad (2014-01-09). "Rep. Bob McDermott's Gay Sex Problem". Honolulu Civil Beat. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  4. ^ Wilson, Joe; Hamer, Dean (2016-02-09). "Why Is Bob McDermott So Obsessed With Sex?". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  5. ^ Nagaoka, Ashley (May 12, 2017). "McDermott touts leadership, officialy [sic] enters 2018 race for governor". Hawaii News Now. Retrieved May 13, 2017.
  6. ^ "Rep. McDermott withdraws from governor's race". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. 2017-08-29. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  7. ^ Dayton, Kevin (2016-03-15). "Lawmaker lobs profanities at fellow Republicans". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  8. ^ "The Republican Party is dying in Hawaii". The Outline. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  9. ^ "Blaming Racism and Sexism, Hawaii Lawmaker Leaves Republican Party". www.governing.com. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  10. ^ "Hawaii's House Republican Leader Says She Was Ousted Over Women's March". NPR.org. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  11. ^ "Primary Election 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide August 11, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  12. ^ "Hawaii General 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 6, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  13. ^ "Primary Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 21, 1996". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 5. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  14. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 5, 1996". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 3. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  15. ^ "Open Primary 98 - State of Hawaii - Hawaii Statewide September 19, 1998". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  16. ^ "General - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 3, 1998". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  17. ^ "Open Primary 2000 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 23, 2000". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  18. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 7, 2000". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  19. ^ "Open Primary Election 2002 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 21, 2002" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  20. ^ "Special Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide January 4, 2003" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. Retrieved November 22, 2013.

External links[edit]