Bob Thomason

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Bob Thomason
Sport(s) Basketball
Biographical details
Born (1949-03-26) March 26, 1949 (age 68)
San Jose, California[1]
Playing career
1968–1971 Pacific
Position(s) Shooting guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1971–1973 Stagg HS (asst.)
1973–1976 Escalon HS
1976–1981 Turlock HS
1981–1985 Columbia CC
1985–1988 Cal State Stanislaus
1988–2013 Pacific
Head coaching record
Overall 75–49 (junior college)
489–348 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Big West Tournament champion (1997, 2004, 2006, 2013)
Big West regular season (1997, 1998, 2004–2006, 2010)
Awards
5× Big West Coach of the Year (1993, 1997, 2004–2006)
Hugh Durham Award (2005)

Robert Lesley "Bob" Thomason, Jr. (born March 26, 1949) is a retired American college basketball coach. He coached the University of the Pacific Tigers men's basketball team for 25 seasons from 1988 to 2013.[2][3]

In 25 years at Pacific, Thomason has the most wins in school and Big West history with 437. He was named Big West Conference Coach of the Year five times (1992–93, 1996–97, 2003–04, 2004–05 and 2005–06).

Early life and college playing career[edit]

Born in San Jose, California, Thomason graduated from Clayton Valley High School in Concord in 1967, where he played for coach Bruce Iverson. Thomson then attended the University of the Pacific in Stockton.[1] At Pacific, Thomason played shooting guard for the Pacific Tigers from 1968 to 1971. He graduated with a degree in physical education and was an All-West Coast Conference selection as a senior after leading Pacific to the 1971 NCAA Tournament and averaging 17.2 points.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Thomason became an assistant coach at Stagg High School in Stockton in 1971. He then became head varsity basketball coach at Escalon High School in 1973 and Turlock High School in 1976. He led Turlock to the school's first conference title in 25 years.[1]

In 1981, Thomason became head coach at Columbia College, a junior college in Sonora, California. In four seasons at Columbia, Thomason had a 75–49 record and led Columbia to its first-ever Central Valley Conference title in 1985.[4]

Thomason moved up to the NCAA Division III ranks as head coach at Cal State Stanislaus in 1985. In three seasons at Cal State Stanislaus, Thomason had a 52–27 record and led the school to a berth in the 1987 NCAA Tournament.[5]

Thomason returned to Pacific to be head coach in 1988 and would stay for 25 seasons. With a 437–321 record, he led Pacific to five NCAA Tournament appearances and six Big West Conference regular season championships.

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Cal State Stanislaus Warriors (Northern California Athletic Conference) (1985–1988)
1985–86 Cal State Stanislaus 15–10 4–8 6th
1986–87 Cal State Stanislaus 20–8 9–3 T–1st NCAA D-III Regional Final
1987–88 Cal State Stanislaus 17–9 8–4 T–2nd
Cal State Stanislaus: 52–27 21–15
Pacific Tigers (Big West Conference) (1988–2013)
1988–89 Pacific 7–21 3–15 9th
1989–90 Pacific 15–14 7–11 6th
1990–91 Pacific 14–15 9–9 3rd
1991–92 Pacific 16–11 8–10 T–6th
1992–93 Pacific 16–11 12–6 3rd
1993–94 Pacific 17–14 10–8 T–5th
1994–95 Pacific 15–12* 9–9 5th
1995–96 Pacific 15–12 11–7 T–2nd
1996–97 Pacific 24–6 12–4 1st (West) NCAA D-I First Round
1997–98 Pacific 23–10 14–2 1st (West) NIT First Round
1998–99 Pacific 14–13 9–7 T–2nd (West)
1999–00 Pacific 11–18 6–10 4th (West)
2000–01 Pacific 18–12 8–8 T–5th
2001–02 Pacific 20–10 11–7 T–3rd
2002–03 Pacific 12–16 7–11 8th
2003–04 Pacific 25–8 17–1 T–1st NCAA D-I Second Round
2004–05 Pacific 27–4 18–0 1st NCAA D-I Second Round
2005–06 Pacific 24–8 12–2 1st NCAA D-I First Round
2006–07 Pacific 12–19 5–9 T–6th
2007–08 Pacific 21–10 11–5 4th
2008–09 Pacific 21–13 10–6 T–2nd CIT Semifinal
2009–10 Pacific 23–12 12–4 T–1st CIT Runners-up
2010–11 Pacific 16–15 8–8 T–4th
2011–12 Pacific 11–19 6–10 T–6th
2012–13 Pacific 22–13 13–5 2nd NCAA D-I First Round
Pacific: 437*–321 259–181
Total: 489–348

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

*Includes a win by forfeit over California in 1994-95.

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]