Bobby Reid (footballer, born 1911)

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Bobby Reid
Personal information
Full name Robert Reid[1]
Date of birth 19 February 1911
Place of birth Hamilton, Scotland[1]
Date of death 16 November 1987(1987-11-16) (aged 76)[2]
Place of death Hamilton, Scotland[2]
Playing position Outside left
Youth career
Ferniegair Violet
1929–1932 Hamilton Academical
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1932–1936 Hamilton Academical 62 (19)
1936–1939 Brentford 103 (34)
1938–1946 Sheffield United 14 (4)
1946–1947 Bury 17 (1)
1947–1949 Third Lanark
National team
1934 Scottish League XI 2 (0)
1937–1938 Scotland 2 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Robert "Bobby" Reid (19 February 1911 – 16 November 1987)[2] was a Scottish footballer who played at both professional and international levels as an outside left. His best remembered for his time in the Football League with Brentford, for whom he made 109 appearances.[3] Reid earned the nickname 'The Flying Scotsman' for his performances down the wing for Hamilton Academical early in his career.[4]

Playing career[edit]

Club career[edit]

Reid began his career in his native Scotland with Hamilton Academical, appearing for them in the 1935 Scottish Cup Final.[5] He moved to England in January 1936 to reunite with friend Dave McCulloch at Division One side Brentford.[4] A spell out following an appendicitis operation allowed Les Smith into the team, with whom Reid would battle for a place through the rest of his Bees career.[4] Reid later played for Sheffield United between 1938 and 1946, joining for a £6,000 fee and scoring 4 goals in 14 league appearances.[2][4] Reid next spent a season with Bury, scoring 1 goal in 17 League appearances.[2] He saw out his career with a player-coach spell at Third Lanark.[3]

International and representative career[edit]

Reid earned two caps for Scotland, making his debut in November 1937.[6] He also made two appearances for the Scottish League XI.[7]

Post-playing career[edit]

Reid served Bury, Third Lanark, Airdrieonians and former club Hamilton Academical as a physiotherapist, arriving back at Douglas Park in the late 1960s.[3] By the time of his death in November 1987, Reid was still with the Accies, working also as kit man.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Reid was awarded a Scottish PFA award for his long service to football.[4]

Honours[edit]

Hamilton Academical

Career statistics[edit]

Club Season League National Cup Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Hamilton Academical 1932–33[10] Scottish First Division 3 0 0 0 3 0
1933–34[8] 9 2 0 0 2[a] 1 11 3
1934–35[9] 36 12 7 0 1[b] 1 44 13
1935–36[11] 14 5 0 0 14 5
Total 62 19 7 0 3 2 72 21
Brentford 1935–36[12] First Division 18 3 18 3
1936–37[12] 28 10 2 2 30 12
1937–38[12] 40 17 4 1 1[c] 0 45 18
1938–39[12] 17 3 17 3
Total 103 33 6 3 1 0 110 36
Career total 165 52 13 3 4 2 182 57
  1. ^ 1 appearance and 1 goal in Lanarkshire Cup, 1 appearance in Southern Counties Cup.
  2. ^ Appearance in Southern Counties Cup.
  3. ^ Appearance in the Empire Exhibition Trophy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Joyce, Michael (2012). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: Tony Brown. p. 242. ISBN 190589161X. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Barry Hugman's Footballers – Bobby Reid". hugmansfootballers.com. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d Haynes, Graham; Coumbe, Frank (2006). Timeless Bees: Brentford F.C. Who's Who 1920–2006. Harefield: Yore Publications. pp. 132–133. ISBN 978-0955294914. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Official Matchday Magazine Of Brentford Football Club versus Stoke City 03/01/00. Blackheath: Morganprint. 2000. p. 27. 
  5. ^ "REID, Robert (1933) – Hamilton Academical Memory Bank". sites.google.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  6. ^ "Player profile". The Scottish FA. Retrieved 31 October 2010. 
  7. ^ "Robert Reid – Scotland Football League Record from 03 Oct 1934 to 31 Oct 1934 clubs – Hamilton Academical". londonhearts.com. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c "1933–34". docs.google.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "1934–35". spreadsheets.google.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  10. ^ "1932–33". docs.google.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  11. ^ "1935–36". docs.google.com. Retrieved 19 December 2016. 
  12. ^ a b c d White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Brentford FC. pp. 373–375. ISBN 0951526200.