Bobby Treviño

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Bobby Treviño
Outfielder
Born: (1945-08-15) August 15, 1945 (age 71)
Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 22, 1968, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
July 6, 1968, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Batting average .225
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 1
Teams

Carlos Treviño Castro [treh-vee-nyo] (born August 15, 1945) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball. During his playing career, he stood at 6' 2" and weighed 185 lbs. His younger brother, Alex Treviño, also played in the major leagues.[1]

Career[edit]

Carlos Treviño was born in Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico. In 1958, he was on the Mexican team that won the Little League World Series title.[2] Treviño then started his professional baseball career in 1964, at the age of 20. He played in both the Mexican Center League and the Mexican League that season.[3]

In 1966, Treviño (known as "Bobby" in the United States) was purchased by the California Angels. He hit .268 for the El Paso Sun Kings in the Texas League in 1967[3] and then went to the Pacific Coast League's Seattle Angels. He hit poorly at Seattle and then returned to El Paso. On May 22, 1968, the Angels called Treviño up to their major league roster to replace an injured Jay Johnstone.[4] Treviño played 17 games for the Angels, getting 9 hits in 40 at bats, with 1 run scored, 1 run batted in, and 1 extra base hit (a double).[1] That was his only major league experience.

In 1969, Treviño made history at El Paso. He started off the season hot at the plate and had a base hit in each of his first 37 games.[5] The 37-game hitting streak set a Texas League record that still stands.[6][7] It was probably Treviño's best year in professional baseball, as he set career-highs in batting average (.314), home runs (6), and RBI (92).[3] However, before the 1970 season, the California Angels organization sent him back to the Mexican League.[1]

Treviño did not play in organized baseball after 1969.[3] He later managed in Mexico for three seasons in the 1970s and 1980s.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Bobby Trevino Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-12-03.
  2. ^ "Former Mexico Little League Sensation Now With Astros". Tri City Herald. May 8, 1968.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Bobby Trevino Minor League Statistics & History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-12-03.
  4. ^ "Angels Recall Bobby Trevino". The Spokesman-Review. May 22, 1968.
  5. ^ "Spurs Defeat Dodgers". Mid Cities Daily News. May 22, 1969.
  6. ^ "Texas League Individual Records". web.minorleaguebaseball.com. Retrieved 2010-12-03.
  7. ^ "Countdown to Opening Day". eastern.league.milb.com. Retrieved 2010-12-03.

External links[edit]