Bodindecha (Sing Singhaseni) School

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Bodindecha (Sing Singhaseni) School
โรงเรียนบดินทรเดชา (สิงห์ สิงหเสนี)
Bodindecha emblem.jpg
Phra Keao, Emblem of Bodindecha (Sing Singhaseni) School
Address
40 Ramkhamhaeng Road Soi 43/1, Phlap Phla, Wang Thong Lang, Bangkok 10310
Thailand
Information
Type Public
Established 30 April 1971
Founder Khun Ying Boonluean Kruatrachue
School board Bangkok Education Service Area Office 2
Authority Office of the Basic Education Commission
School code 1000104501
Director Areerat Wattanathongpiew, PhD
Grades 7–12 (Mathayom 1–6)
Gender Co-educational
Number of students ~5,000
Campus size 40.5 rai (6.5 ha)
School colour(s) Blue
Song Thong Nam Ngoen
Website

Bodindecha (Sing Singhaseni) School (โรงเรียนบดินทรเดชา (สิงห์ สิงหเสนี)), commonly abbreviated as Bodin, is a Thai high school. It teaches students from grades 7–12. The school is in Wang Thong Lang, Bangkok. The number of currently registered students is approximately 5,000.

The school was established on 30 April 1971. The school is named in honour of Chao Phraya Bodindecha, also known as Sing Singhaseni, who was a general from Yasothon under King Rama III (Phra Nangklao) of Siam.

In May 2012, parents and students at the school staged a hunger strike to protest what they viewed as admissions abuse. The issue arose when 200 Bodin students were denied the right to continue their studies at the school at the end of the 2011 school year. The students suspected that school executives had taken away their seats to give to children of parents willing to pay huge sums of "tea money" or bribes. Admission to popular schools can cost "tea money" sums up to seven figures. The greater the competition, the higher the amount of donations the parents believe they have to offer in exchange for their children's chances to get a good education at a quality school such as Bodin.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saengpassa, Chularat (2012-05-28). "The rampant custom of 'tea money' persists, and where has it got us?". The Nation. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 13°46′05.27″N 100°36′53.60″E / 13.7681306°N 100.6148889°E / 13.7681306; 100.6148889