Bodoland People's Front

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Bodoland People's Front
Chairperson Hagrama Mohilary
Rajya Sabha leader Biswajit Daimary
Headquarters Kokrajhar, Assam
Ideology Secularism
Left-wing Populism
ECI Status State Party[1]
Alliance National Democratic Alliance (NDA)
Seats in Lok Sabha
0 / 545
Seats in Rajya Sabha
1 / 245
Election symbol
Nagol
Website
www.bpfassam.in

The Bodoland People's Front (BPF) is a state political party in Assam state in northeastern India. In the 2009 general election its candidate, Sansuma Khunggur Bwiswmuthiary was elected to the 15th Lok Sabha from Kokrajhar constituency. Biswajit Daimary of this party was elected to the Rajya Sabha in May 2008. BPF had 10 members in the 12th Assam Legislative Assembly, and it is a constituent of the current Indian National Congress led ruling coalition in Assam.[2] In the 2011 Assam Assembly election, BPF won 12 seats.

In 2011, with 12 elected lawmakers, the Bodoland People's Front or BPF had supported the Congress government, primarily because of the efforts of Himanta Biswa Sarma, the former minister in the Gogoi government who's now joined the BJP.

With Assam heading for elections - expected to take place around April, 2016 - the BJP is all set to announce its first alliance with the Bodoland People's Front in lower Assam.

The announcement is expected to be made on January 19 when Prime Minister Narendra Modi visits Kokrajhar - headquarters of the autonomous Bodo Territorial Council (BTC)- and announces a possible economic package for the Bodo council.

Chief Hagrama Mohilary has claimed that the alliance BPF-BJP would defeat the ruling Congress party in the upcoimng election.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Political Parties and Election Symbols main Notification Dated 18.01.2013" (PDF). India: Election Commission of India. 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Karmakar, Rahul (4 February 2011). "Assam polls: Cong sure, test for minority party". Hindustan Times. Retrieved 20 February 2011.