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This article is about the general clothing type. For the high speed swim-wear, see Bodyskin.
A female version of the bodysuit

A bodysuit or shorthand body is a one-piece form-fitting garment that covers the torso and the crotch.[1] The style of a basic bodysuit is similar to a one-piece swimsuit and a leotard, though the materials may vary, and a bodysuit, unlike a swimsuit or leotard, has snaps, hooks or velcro at the crotch. A bodysuit may have sleeves and varying shoulder strap and collar styles. Bodysuits can be made from a number of fabrics, including cotton, lace, nylon, etc. In general, textile bodysuits include expandable fiber such as spandex for a better fit to the shape of the body.

A bodysuit is normally worn with trousers or a skirt. The top, torso part may act as a top for the smooth line it gives or because it cannot become untucked from trousers or skirt. They may also be worn generally by women as underwear, activewear, or foundation garments. Unlike a leotard, a bodysuit is not usually considered a form of athletic wear. Onesies (or snapsuits) are bodysuits for younger children, toddlers and some adults which help keep diapers (or nappies) in place. The purpose of the opening at the crotch is to facilitate access to a baby's diaper (or nappy), or for a visit to the toilet.

There are also bodyshirts, like the counterpart to the bodysuit, they are loose-fitting garments that cover the whole torso, with sleeves in short to long lengths and crotch snaps. The difference is that they look like a shirt on the top portion of the garment, and may have a different stretch fabric in the waist to the crotch area to make them fit better.


Victoria's Secret model wearing a bodysuit with a skirt, as it is encountered in everyday life.

The bodysuit was a progression from the leotard. It was presented in the United States after 1950 by fashion designer Claire McCardell. It was worn as a blouse or T-shirt. The first recognized bodysuit was worn by Bettie Page in the 1950s, and was a trademark attire of the Playboy Bunnies from the 1960s, as well as of Wonder Woman as a cartoon character.[2]

Azzedine Alaia and Donna Karan helped make the bodysuit a fashion item for both men and women in the 1980s. After a slowdown, it was resurrected as shaping underwear or lingerie, and in the 2010s it reappeared as a blouse bodysuit and classic turtleneck bodysuit, as well as a part of evening wear.

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Merriam-webster dictionary
  2. ^ Le Nouvel Observateur: Philippe Azoury (6 June 2012). "Body sauvé des eaux" (in French) (3). Obsession. pp. 88–93. ISSN 0029-4713.