Bohuslav Hasištejnský z Lobkovic

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Bohuslav Hasištejnský z Lobkovic

Bohuslav Hasištejnský z Lobkovic (Czech pronunciation: [ˈboɦuslav ˈɦasɪʃtɛjnskiː ˈzlopkovits]) (1461 – 11 November 1510) was a Czech nobleman, writer and humanist of old Bohemian family (later the princes) of Lobkovic.

He was born at Hasištejn Castle near Kadaň, Bohemia. He studied in Bologna and Ferrara (doctor of law, 1482) and converted from Utraquism to Catholicism there. After 1483, he became provost of Vyšehrad in Prague and between 1490–91 he travelled to the Holy Land and Egypt, earning the nickname "the Czech Ulysses". He was elected the bishop of Olomouc, but he was refused by the Pope. After this, he lived with a few of his writer friends in his 'tusculum', Hasištejn Castle in north-eastern Bohemia.

Lobkovic was an author of philosophical prose, letters, and verses, amongst them a satire on Bohemian national life: Ad sanctum Venceslaum satira (1489). He was a successful essayist and poet, and became poeta laureatus.

His good friends were Jan Šlechta z Všehrd, a philosopher, and Viktorin Kornel ze Všehrd, a theorist of Bohemian common law. He was the younger brother of Jan Hasištejnský z Lobkovic.

He died at Hasištejn Castle in 1510.

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Sources[edit]

  • KYZOUROVÁ, Ivana. Básník a král: Bohuslav Hasištejnský z Lobkovic v zrcadle jagellonské doby. Praha: Správa pražského hradu, 2007, 127p.
  • MARTÍNEK,Jan, MARTÍNKOVÁ, Dana. ed.Epistulae Bohuslaus Hassinsteinius a Lobkowicz. Leipzig: B.G.Teubner, 1980.