Boloria dia

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Boloria dia
Nymphalidae - Boloria (Clossiana) dia-001.JPG
Ventral view
Nymphalidae - Boloria (Clossiana) dia.JPG
Dorsal view
Scientific classification
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B. dia
Binomial name
Boloria dia
Synonyms
  • Clossiana dia
  • Boloria (Clossiana) dia

Boloria dia, the Weaver's fritillary or violet fritillary, is a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. The name Weaver's fritillary is in honor of Richard Weaver (fl. 1790-1860), an English insect collector who claimed to have obtained the specimen within ten miles of Birmingham around 1820.[1] However, B. dia is uncommon in England and the few specimens known from there are thought to be from possibly accidental introductions.[2]

Description[edit]

The adult is a small fritillary with typically chequered orange-brown upperside and a submarginal row of triangles and dots. The forewing is 16–17 mm long. The underside of the hindwing has a distinctive purplish band.

B. dia differs from the pearl-bordered fritillary in having a sharp angle to its hindwing (readily seen from underside when perched with wings closed). The similar Titania's fritillary has a less sharply-angled hindwing and only occurs at high altitude.[3]

In Europe the larvae feed on Viola species (Viola odorata, Viola hirta, Viola canina, Viola reichenbachiana, Viola tricolor), and outside Europe on Prunella vulgaris and Rubus idaeus.

Distribution[edit]

B. dia is found in Europe, over the Caucasus east across the Palearctic to Mongolia. It is widespread and common across southern France.[3] In Europe it occurs from northern Spain, Italy and Greece to Poland, the Balkans and Turkey.[4][5] It is not found in Britain.

Subspecies[edit]

  • Clossiana dia dia western Europe
  • Clossiana dia alpina (Elwes, 1899)
  • Clossiana dia calida (Jachontov, 1911)
  • Clossiana dia disconota (Krulikovsky, 1909) central Europe and western Siberia
  • Clossiana dia semota Tuzov, 2000
  • Clossiana dia setania (Fruhstorfer, 1909)[5]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Salmon, Michael A. (2000). The Aurelian Legacy. British Butterflies and their Collectors. Harley Books. pp. 133–134.
  2. ^ Eeles, Peter (2002–2012). "Weaver's Fritillary". UK Butterflies. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  3. ^ a b Gibbons, Roger (2011). "Weaver's Fritillary". Butterflies of France. Retrieved July 27, 2012.
  4. ^ Funet.fi
  5. ^ a b Fauna Europaea

External links[edit]