Bomb Culture

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Bomb Culture is a book by Jeff Nuttall about the counter-culture in London, which was first published in 1968.[1] It reflected the influence of the threat of nuclear war, while describing the importance of pop music like the Beatles and countercultural figures like the Beat Generation.[2] Nuttall believed in the liberatory power of imagination and "affect", which he hoped could bring about social change.[1]

Critical response[edit]

Kirkus Reviews called Nuttall "a powerhouse communicator or overcommunicator with all the sprawling intellectual continuity and splashy effects that is implied", and suggested that the book was primarily aimed at Nuttall's own generation.[2]

The Guardian in 2004 said it "remains a primary source and manifesto for the post-Hiroshima generation".[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Whiteley, Gillian (2011). "Sewing the ‘subversive thread of imagination’: Jeff Nuttall, Bomb Culture and the radical potential of affect". The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture. 4 (2): 109–133. doi:10.1080/17541328.2011.625198. 
  2. ^ a b "Bomb Culture (Review)". Kirkus Reviews. 1969. Retrieved 15 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Horovitz, Michael (12 January 2004). "Jeff Nuttall (Obituary)". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 15 April 2013. 

External links[edit]