Bomb Harvest

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Bomb Harvest
Bomb harvest poster.gif
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Kim Mordaunt
Produced by Sylvia Wilczynski
Screenplay by Kim Mordaunt and Sylvia Wilczynski
Starring Laith Stevens
Music by Caitlin Yeo
Edited by Sloane Klevin
Distributed by TVF International
Release date
2007
Running time
88 minutes
Country Australia
Language English

Bomb Harvest is a 2007 documentary film directed by Australian filmmaker Kim Mordaunt and produced by Sylvia Wilczynski. It explores the consequences of war in Laos as it follows an Australian bomb disposal specialist, training locals in the skill of detonating bombs while trying to stop villagers, particularly children, from finding them and using them for scrap metal.[1]

During the Vietnam War, Laos was the target of the heaviest US bombing campaign, making Laos the most bombed country in history: from 1964 until 1973 more than two million tonnes of bombs were dropped, including 260 million cluster munitions. An estimated 30% of the bombs dropped did not detonate. Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) continues to kill and injure people, and prevent them from using land, including growing food. UXO are a key factor in the poverty and stifling the development of the country.[2][3][4]

Bomb Harvest explores how three generations of people have been left to deal with the consequences of the air war, and depicts the bravery of those trying to clear up its remnants.

The film crew spent two months on the ground with bomb disposal teams from the Mines Advisory Group as they dealt with live bombs, in areas of Laos which have never been filmed in before. The film premiered at the 2007 Sydney Film Festival, and won a Children's Advocacy award at the 2008 Artivist Film Festival.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bomb Harvest". At the Movies. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  2. ^ MacKinnon, Ian (3 December 2008). "Forty years on, Laos reaps bitter harvest of the secret war". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 6 November 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-07. 
  4. ^ [1]

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