Bomber Girl

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Bomber Girl
ボンバーガール
(Bonbā Gāru)
Genre Action
Manga
Bomber Girl (pilot chapter)
Written by Makoto Niwano
Published by Shueisha
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump: Zōkan Spring Special
Published 1993
Manga
Written by Makoto Niwano
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump
English magazine
Published 1994
Volumes 1
Manga
Bomber Girl Crash!
Written by Makoto Niwano
Published by Shōnen Gahosha
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Young Comic, Young King
Published 2000
Volumes 3
Manga
Bomber Girl Complete
Written by Makoto Niwano
Published by Shōnen Gahosha
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Young King
Published 2002
Manga
Bomber Girl XXX
Written by Makoto Niwano
Published by Shōnen Gahosha
Demographic Seinen
Magazine Young King
Published 2004
Volumes 3
Anime and Manga portal

Bomber Girl (Japanese: ボンバーガール Hepburn: Bonbā Gāru?) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Makoto Niwano.

The series is about Emi Rashomon (羅生門エミー Rashomon Emii?), a bounty hunter who uses her sex appeal to defeat enemies. Guy Kurosaki (黒崎 ガイ Kurosaki Gai?) is a police officer who initially opposes Emi's methods.

In Japan it was published in Weekly Shōnen Jump by Shueisha's Jump Comics division. The series was published by Gutsoon Entertainment in the United States.[1]

Reception[edit]

The series received very negative critics from manga and anime reviewers. John Jakala said that the first instalment of the series was okay, but the second was even more amateur. He referred to a car panel as it looked like something an elementary school child would draw in the margins of his math notebook.[2] He also noted that he does not want to pay for work of such unprofessional quality. He cast his vote against Bomber Girl on an online survey.[2] John Jakala continuously made fun of the series in the later reviews.

Jason Thompson described it as "amoral girl with big boobs killing and torturing people," despising the manga as he stated, "[it] is so awful that I assume it got published because [Makoto] Niwano jumped into an icy river to save [Tetsuo] Hara and [Tsukasa] Hojo from drowning."[3] Eduardo M. Chavez of Mania Entertainment pondered, "For those looking for a manga with a lot of action, a good amount of fan-service, and some crazy looking characters this might be a good call. ... For those looking for something with a decent plot, character designs that won't disturb you, and fan-service that does not involved greased up male cult members or a gang boss that has a gattling gun [sic] on ... his phallus you should pass."[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bomber Girl Volume 1." Amazon.com. Accessed October 4, 2008.
  2. ^ a b John Jakala (2003-01-07). "Raijin Comics #2 - Review - Anime News Network". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2008-10-18. 
  3. ^ Thompson, Jason (2012-01-05). "Jason Thompson's House of 1000 Manga - Raijin Comics". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2014-11-30. 
  4. ^ "Bomber Girl Vol. #1". Mania Entertainment. December 3, 2004. Retrieved November 30, 2014.