Bonneau du Martray

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The label of a Bonneau du Martray Corton Charlemagne from 1999

Bonneau du Martray is a French wine grower and producer based in Pernand-Vergelesses, in the Côte de Beaune wine-growing region of Burgundy, France. Bonneau du Martray is the only estate in Burgundy to exclusively produce wine from Grand cru vineyards.[1]

The estate was owned and managed by Jean-Charles de la Moriniere who inherited it from his father in 1994.[1] Jean-Charles has been working on moving viticultural management and the care of the vineyard toward a biodynamic philosophy and away from the previous use of herbicides to manage weeds and pests.[2] He has also worked to reduce yields significantly in an effort to improve the intensity and quality of the finished wine.[3][4]

In 2017, the Domaine was sold to Stan Kroenke.

Only two wines are produced from the vineyard holdings of the domaine. A White Burgundy with Chardonnay grapes from the 9.5 hectares the estate owns in Corton-Charlemagne and a Red Burgundy with Pinot Noir grapes from 1.5 hectares owned in the Corton vineyard. Bonneau du Martray is the largest single owner of vines within the Corton-Charlemagne vineyard [5] and owns the largest area of a single Grand cru vineyard of any producer in Burgundy.[6]

Clive Coates describes Bonneau Du Martray's white Corton-Charlemagne wine as "one of the very greatest in all Burgundy" [1] and Hugh Johnson lists Bonneau du Martray as one of the leading Côte d'Or producers and gives the estate his highest rating of 4 stars indicating "exceptionally fine or great quality, consistent over many vintages".[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Coates, Clive (2008). The Wines of Burgundy. University of California Press. pp. 191–192. ISBN 978-0-520-25050-5. 
  2. ^ Port, Jeni, The Age (2005-09-06). "Medieval maestros". theage.com.au. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  3. ^ Mansson, Per-Henrik, Wine Spectator (February 2, 2001). Domaine Bonneau du Martray: Hitting Its Stride
  4. ^ Jefford, Andrew (2006). The New France. Mitchell Beazley. p. 97. ISBN 978-1-84533-000-2. 
  5. ^ a b Johnson, Hugh (2003). Hugh Johnson's Wine Companion. Mitchell Beazley. p. 111. ISBN 1-84000-704-4. 
  6. ^ Johnson, Hugh (2005). Wine: A Life Uncorked. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 153–154. ISBN 978-0-297-84378-8. 

External links[edit]