Bonnie Henry

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Bonnie Henry
Bonnie Henry March 26 COVID-19 update.jpg
Henry speaks at a British Columbia COVID-19 update in 2020
Alma materDalhousie University Faculty of Medicine
University of California, San Diego
University of Toronto
Known forPublic health
Home townCharlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada[1]
Scientific career
InstitutionsUniversity of British Columbia

Bonnie Henry is a Canadian physician who is the Provincial Health Officer for British Columbia and Clinical Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia. She is a specialist in public health and preventive medicine (also known as community medicine).

Early life and education[edit]

Henry grew up in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, where her mother, father, sister, niece and nephew live,[1] and completed medical school at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She went on to complete a master of public health in San Diego.[2][3] Henry served as a medical officer for the Royal Canadian Navy while working on her degree at Dalhousie, and was based out of CFB Esquimalt on Vancouver Island, B.C.[4] She was a medical resident at the University of California, San Diego, before returning to Canada to practice community medicine at the University of Toronto.[2]

Research and career[edit]

In the early 2000s Henry served as part of the World Health OrganizationUNICEF polio eradication programme in Pakistan.[5] She continued to work with the World Health Organization in 2001, moving to Uganda to support their efforts to tackle the Ebola virus disease.[6] Henry helped to establish the Canada Pandemic Influenza Plan, which contains recommendations for health-related activities during the spread of a virus.[7]

Henry joined the Toronto Public Health as an associate medical health officer, where she led the communicable disease unit. In this capacity she coordinated the Toronto response to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 outbreaks.[2][8] In 2005 Henry was made Director of Communicable Disease prevention and public health management at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.[2] She helped Canada to plan and police the 2010 Winter Olympics.[8][9]

In 2013 Henry was made Executive Director of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.[2][10] She was made Deputy Provincial Health Officer in 2014.[2][11] She helped to lead British Columbia through a catastrophic wildfire season, which impacted the air quality, as well as advising the Government of Canada on the Influenza A virus subtype H7N9 epidemic.[12]

In 2018, Henry was appointed as the Provincial Health Officer for British Columbia, and is the first woman to hold the role.[2][12] She chairs the pandemic influenza task group.[13] The group looks to minimise the number of people who become seriously ill during a pandemic, as well as limiting the social disruptions.[13] She called for more efficient electronic systems to understand vaccine uptake, as well as manage Canada's vaccine inventory.[13]

Henry is involved with coordinating and communicating British Columbia's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in British Columbia.[14][15] The medical columnist for The Globe and Mail described Henry as "a calming voice in a sea of coronavirus madness".[16]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Poutanen, Susan M; Low, Donald E; Henry, Bonnie; Finkelstein, Sandy; Rose, David; Green, Karen; Tellier, Raymond; Draker, Ryan; Adachi, Dena; Ayers, Melissa; Chan, Adrienne K (2003). "Identification of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Canada". N Engl J Med New England Journal of Medicine. 348 (20): 1995–2005. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa030634. ISSN 0028-4793. OCLC 4638980317. PMID 12671061.
  • Svoboda, Tomislav; Henry, Bonnie; Shulman, Leslie; Kennedy, Erin; Rea, Elizabeth; Ng, Wil; Wallington, Tamara; Yaffe, Barbara; Gournis, Effie; Vicencio, Elisa; Basrur, Sheela (2004-06-03). "Public Health Measures to Control the Spread of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome during the Outbreak in Toronto". New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (23): 2352–2361. doi:10.1056/nejmoa032111. ISSN 0028-4793. PMID 15175437.
  • Loeb, Mark; McGeer, Allison; Henry, Bonnie; Ofner, Marianna; Rose, David; Hlywka, Tammy; Levie, Joanne; McQueen, Jane; Smith, Stephanie; Moss, Lorraine; Smith, Andrew (2004). "SARS among Critical Care Nurses, Toronto". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 10 (2): 251–255. doi:10.3201/eid1002.030838. ISSN 1080-6040. PMC 3322898. PMID 15030692.
  • Basrur, Sheela V.; Yaffe, Barbara; Henry, Bonnie (2004). "SARS: A Local Public Health Perspective". Canadian Journal of Public Health. 95 (1): 22–24. doi:10.1007/BF03403628. PMC 6976208. PMID 14768736.
  • Henry, Bonnie. (2012). Soap and water & common sense : the definitive guide to viruses, bacteria, parasites and disease. Anansi. ISBN 978-0-88784-937-4. OCLC 805951252.
  • Henry, B.; Gadient, S. (2017). "Canada's pandemic vaccine strategy". Canada Communicable Disease Report. 43 (7/8): 164–167. doi:10.14745/ccdr.v43i78a05. PMID 29770084.
  • Henry, B. (2018). "Canadian Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: Health sector planning guidance". Canada Communicable Disease Report. 44 (1): 6–9. doi:10.14745/ccdr.v44i01a02. PMC 5937063. PMID 29770091.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fraser, Sara (4 May 2020). "Meet one of the heroes of the pandemic: B.C.'s Dr. Bonnie Henry is from P.E.I." Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 4 May 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Health, Ministry of. "Biographies - Province of British Columbia". www2.gov.bc.ca. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  3. ^ "Meet B.C.'s provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry | BC Pharmacy Association". www.bcpharmacy.ca. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  4. ^ D'Souza, Jason (15 April 2020). "Dr. Bonnie Henry brings wealth of global experience to B.C.'s COVID-19 response". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  5. ^ "Bonnie Henry". National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases. 2015-04-30. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  6. ^ "Bonnie Henry". Canadian Science Policy Centre. 2015-12-03. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  7. ^ Meissner, Dirk (2020-03-08). "Dr. Bonnie Henry, virus hunter and healer, resolves to 'break' COVID-19". British Columbia. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  8. ^ a b "Bonnie Henry". School of Population and Public Health (SPPH). Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  9. ^ ""Soap and Water and Common Sense" Bonnie Henry, MD, MPH". KVMR Community Radio. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  10. ^ "Bonnie Henry, MD MPH FRCPC". Virology Education. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  11. ^ "Dr. Bonnie Henry appointed Deputy Provincial Health Officer of BC". School of Population and Public Health (SPPH). 2014-08-21. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  12. ^ a b Mall, Rattan. "Dr. Bonnie Henry will be first female provincial health officer in B.C. | Indo-Canadian Voice". www.voiceonline.com. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  13. ^ a b c December 5, Elizabeth Payne Updated; 2018 (2018-12-05). "'Are we ready?': Canada and the world have work to do before next pandemic, say experts | Ottawa Citizen". Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ "COVID-19 precautions 'not optional,' B.C.'s Dr. Bonnie Henry warns". Trail Daily Times. 2020-03-20. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  15. ^ "B.C. health officials to provide Friday update on coronavirus response". Global News. Archived from the original on 2020-03-20. Retrieved 2020-03-20.
  16. ^ "Opinion: Bonnie Henry is a calming voice in a sea of coronavirus madness". Archived from the original on 2020-03-15. Retrieved 2020-03-20.