Bonnyville (provincial electoral district)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Bonnyville was a provincial electoral district in north east Alberta, Canada. It elected members to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from its creation in 1952 until 1997 when the riding was renamed Bonnyville-Cold Lake, to more accurately reflect the two largest population centres in the constituency. It was created in 1952 from the northern part of the St. Paul electoral district.

Representation history[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Bonnyville
Assembly Years Member Party
See St. Paul 1913-1952
12th 1952–1955 Laudas Joly Social Credit
13th 1955–1959 Jake Josvanger Liberal
14th 1959–1961 Karl Nordstrom Social Credit
1961 Vacant
1961–1963 Romeo Lamothe Social Credit
15th 1963–1967
16th 1967–1971
17th 1971–1975 Donald Hansen Progressive Conservative
18th 1975–1979
19th 1979–1982 Ernie Isley
20th 1982–1986
21st 1986–1989
22nd 1989–1993
23rd 1993–1997 Leo Vasseur Liberal
See Bonnyville-Cold Lake 1997-present

The new district was won by former United Farmers MLA for St. Paul, Laudas Joly, running as a Social Credit candidate. Upon his retirement in 1955, the riding would be won by Jake Josvanger, as part of the Liberal Party's brief revival under James Harper Prowse.

Social Credit would re-take Bonnyville in 1959, but new MLA Karl Nordstrom died in office in 1961, triggering a by-election later that year. Social Credit candidate Romeo Lamothe would retain the seat, and go on to serve two full terms after that.

In Peter Lougheed's 1971 victory for the Progressive Conservatives, candidate Donald Hansen would capture Bonnyville for the new government, and serve two terms as MLA. Upon his retirement in 1979, Ernie Isley would retain the seat for the PCs and serve four terms as MLA, holding several cabinet positions under Lougheed and Don Getty.

When Ralph Klein became premier in 1992, Isley remained minister of Agriculture, but then lost his seat in the 1993 election to Liberal Leo Vasseur.

The riding was then replaced by Bonnyville-Cold Lake for the 1997 election, in which PC candidate Denis Ducharme would defeat Vasseur and re-gain the seat.

Election results[edit]

1950's[edit]

The 1952 and 1955 elections were done by instant-runoff voting, although a second round was not needed in the district for either.

Alberta general election, 1952
Party Candidate Votes %[1]
Social Credit Laudas Joly 2,497 65.94%
Liberal Irvin J. Baril 1,290 34.06%
Total valid votes 3,787
Rejected, spoiled and declined 215
Eligible electors / Turnout 5,935 67.43%
Social Credit pickup new district.
Alberta general election, 1955
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Jake Josvanger 2,250 51.50% +17.44%
Social Credit Alfred A. Muller 1,331 30.46% -35.48%
Independent L.F. Krawchuk 788 18.04%
Total valid votes 4,369
Rejected, spoiled and declined 384
Eligible electors / Turnout 6,393 74.35% +6.92%
Liberal gain from Social Credit Swing +26.46%

Alberta switched back to traditional first past the post elections in 1959, which can be seen in the dramatic drop in spoiled (incorrectly marked) ballots compared to previous elections.

Alberta general election, 1959
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Social Credit Karl Nordstrom 2,465 51.66% +21.20%
Liberal Jake Josvanger 1,447 30.32% -21.18%
Progressive Conservative Victor Justik 860 18.02%
Total valid votes 4,772
Rejected, spoiled and declined 14
Eligible electors / Turnout 8,108 59.03% -15.32%
Social Credit gain from Liberal Swing +21.19%

1960's[edit]

Alberta provincial by-election, November 27, 1961
upon the death of Karl Nordstrom
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%[2]
Social Credit Romeo Lamothe 2,401 63.86% +12.20%
Progressive Conservative Victor Justik 689 18.32% +0.30%
Liberal C.K. Josvanger 670 17.82% -12.50%
Total valid votes 3,760
Rejected, spoiled and declined -
Eligible electors / Turnout - -
Social Credit hold Swing +6.25%
Alberta general election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Social Credit Romeo Lamothe 2,222 48.02% -15.84%
Progressive Conservative Victor Justik 1,091 23.58% +5.26%
Liberal Albert Turcotte 1,059 22.89% +5.07%
New Democratic Peter Forman 255 5.51%
Total valid votes 4,627
Rejected, spoiled and declined 11
Eligible electors / Turnout 8,267 59.10%
Social Credit hold Swing -5.29%
Alberta general election, 1967
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Social Credit Romeo Lamothe 2,339 54.51% +6.49%
Progressive Conservative Victor Justik 1,636 38.13% +14.55%
New Democratic Kenneth Kerr 316 7.36% +1.85%
Total valid votes 4,291
Rejected, spoiled and declined 31
Eligible electors / Turnout 8,599 50.26% -8.84%
Social Credit hold Swing -4.03%

1970's[edit]

Alberta general election, 1971
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Donald Hansen 2,523 46.58% +8.45%
Social Credit Lorne Mowers 2,355 43.47% -11.04%
New Democratic Claire Gaines 539 9.95% +2.59%
Total valid votes 5,417
Rejected, spoiled and declined 21
Eligible electors / Turnout 9,234 58.89% +8.63%
Progressive Conservative gain from Social Credit Swing +9.75%
Alberta general election, 1975
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Donald Hansen 3,226 56.84% +10.26%
Social Credit George Nordstrom 1,119 19.71% -23.76%
New Democratic Franklin Foster 805 14.18% +4.23%
Liberal Ron Pernarowski 526 9.27%
Total valid votes 5,676
Rejected, spoiled and declined 18
Eligible electors / Turnout 9,451 60.25% +1.36%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +17.01%
Alberta general election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Isley 3,468 49.75% -7.09%
New Democratic Tom Turner 1,828 26.22% +12.04%
Social Credit George Nordstrom 1,275 18.29% -1.42%
Independent Donald Appleby 206 2.96%
Liberal Edward Stepanik 194 2.78% -6.49%
Total valid votes 6,971
Rejected, spoiled and declined 25
Eligible electors / Turnout 11,053 63.30% +3.05%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -9.57%

1980's[edit]

Alberta general election, 1982
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Isley 4,842 59.62% +9.87%
New Democratic Tom Turner 2,547 31.36% +5.14%
Western Canada Concept Eric E. Enns 732 9.02%
Total valid votes 8,121
Rejected, spoiled and declined 13
Eligible electors / Turnout 12,343 66.01% +2.71%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +2.37%
Alberta general election, 1986
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Isley 3,630 65.42% +5.80%
New Democratic Thomas J. Tucker 1,663 29.97% -1.39%
Western Canada Concept Vern McCaig 256 4.61% -4.41%
Total valid votes 5,549
Rejected, spoiled and declined 15
Eligible electors / Turnout 15,258 36.47% -29.54%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing +3.60%
Alberta general election, 1989
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Isley 3,362 50.30% -15.12%
Liberal Denis Lapierre 1,769 26.47%
New Democratic Lori Hall 1,553 23.23% -6.74%
Total valid votes 6,684
Rejected, spoiled and declined 13
Eligible electors / Turnout 15,127 44.27% +7.80%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing -20.80%

1993 Election[edit]

Alberta general election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%[3]
Liberal Leo Vasseur 4,364 47.2% +20.7%
Progressive Conservative Ernie Isley 4,222 45.6% -4.7%
New Democratic Agathe Gaulin 666 7.2% -16.0%
Total valid votes 9,252
Rejected, spoiled and declined 39
Eligible electors / Turnout 16,826 55.2% +10.9%
Liberal gain from Progressive Conservative Swing +12.7%

Plebiscite results[edit]

1957 liquor plebiscite[edit]

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: Bonnyville[4]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot Choice Votes %
Yes 1,716 66.05%
No 882 33.95%
Total Votes 2,598 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 31
6,988 Eligible Electors, Turnout 37.62%

On October 30, 1957 a stand-alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[5]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[4]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. Bonnyville voted in favour of the proposal by an overwhelming majority. The district recorded a poor voter turnout, falling well below the province wide average of 46%.[4]

Official district returns were released to the public on December 31, 1957.[4] The Social Credit government in power at the time did not considered the results binding.[6] However the results of the vote led the government to repeal all existing liquor legislation and introduce an entirely new Liquor Act.[7]

Municipal districts lying inside electoral districts that voted against the Plebiscite were designated Local Option Zones by the Alberta Liquor Control Board and considered effective dry zones, business owners that wanted a license had to petition for a binding municipal plebiscite in order to be granted a license.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Abheritage.ca — Electoral results for Bonnyville.". 
  2. ^ "Elections Alberta: By-elections". Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  3. ^ "Summary of Results by Electoral Division, 1982-2015". 
  4. ^ a b c d Alberta Gazette. 53 (December 31 ed.). Government of Alberta. 1957. pp. 2,247–2,249. 
  5. ^ "Albertans Vote 2 to 1 For More Liquor Outlets". Vol L No 273. The Lethbridge Herald. October 31, 1957. pp. 1–2. 
  6. ^ "No Sudden Change In Alberta Drinking Habits Is Seen". Vol L No 267. The Lethbridge Herald. October 24, 1957. p. 1. 
  7. ^ "Entirely New Act On Liquor". Vol LI No 72. The Lethbridge Herald. March 5, 1958. p. 1. 
  8. ^ "Bill 81". Alberta Bills 12th Legislature 1st Session. Government of Alberta. 1958. p. 40. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 54°15′14″N 110°31′26″W / 54.254°N 110.524°W / 54.254; -110.524