Boonton Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Boonton Township, New Jersey
Township of Boonton
Dolan's Falls early morning
Dolan's Falls early morning
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Boonton Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Boonton Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°55′53″N 74°25′30″W / 40.931264°N 74.424928°W / 40.931264; -74.424928Coordinates: 40°55′53″N 74°25′30″W / 40.931264°N 74.424928°W / 40.931264; -74.424928[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
IncorporatedApril 11, 1867
Named forThomas Boone
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorThomas R. Donadio (R, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • AdministratorDouglas Cabana[5]
 • Municipal clerkDouglas Cabana[6]
Area
 • Total8.50 sq mi (22.01 km2)
 • Land8.12 sq mi (21.04 km2)
 • Water0.38 sq mi (0.97 km2)  4.41%
Area rank227th of 565 in state
18th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation518 ft (158 m)
Population
 • Total4,263
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
4,237
 • Rank402nd of 566 in state
32nd of 39 in county[13]
 • Density517.2/sq mi (199.7/km2)
 • Density rank443rd of 566 in state
35th of 39 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973[16]
FIPS code3402706640[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882205[1][19]
Websitewww.boontontownship.com

Boonton Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,263,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 24 (-0.6%) from the 4,287 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 721 (+20.2%) from the 3,566 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Boonton Township was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 11, 1867, from portions of Pequannock Township. The borough of Mountain Lakes was formed from portions of the township on March 3, 1924.[21][22] The settlement was originally called "Boone-Towne" in 1761 in honor of the Colonial Governor Thomas Boone.[23][24]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Boonton Township as the 4th best place to live in the state in its rankings of the "New Jersey's Top Towns 2011-2012.[25]

History[edit]

Boonton Township's recorded history began about 1710 when William Penn, the Quaker land speculator, located in the northern valley his Lot No. 48, which contained 1,430 acres (580 ha) of fields and woodlands. James Bollen, whose bordering "plantation" stretching south toward the Tourne was described as "situate on the fork of Rockaway with an Indian plantation in it," mapped his 1,507 acres (6 km2) in 1715. In 1765 David Ogden purchased from Burnet and Skinner the Great Boonton Tract. When the Township of Boonton was created as of April 11, 1867 by "An Act to Divide the Township of Pequannoc in the County of Morris" most of Penn's Lot No. 48 and parts of the Bollen and Great Boonton Tracts fell within Boonton's boundary.

The first settler of proper record was Frederick DeMouth of French Huguenot extraction. By 1758, his Rockaway Valley plantation within the Penn Lot covered 672 acres (2.72 km2), and it was on this land that the large Stickle, Bott and Kincaid farms were to prosper in the far distant future. Frederick Miller of German Palatine birth bought extensive land (later day Dixon acres) within the Bollen piece at 13 shillings per acre. These founding families were closely followed by the Hoplers, Van Winkles, Cooks, Scotts, Peers, Stickles and Kanouses.

McCaffrey Lane, the oldest recorded thoroughfare in the area, was built in 1767 by Samuel Ogden of the Great Boonton Tract. In 1822, North Main Street was "cut" along the proposed Morris Canal route. In 1824, the Morris Canal and Banking Company was chartered with John Scott of Powerville, an important commissioner. Lock Numbers 9, 10 and 11 were constructed in newly named Powerville. The Powerville Hotel, still standing, was built near Lock Number 11 to accommodate both canal and transient trade. It later gained fame as a pre-American Civil War Underground Railroad station.[26]

Geography[edit]

Dixon Homestead in Winter

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 8.50 square miles (22.01 km2), including 8.12 square miles (21.04 km2) of land and 0.38 square miles (0.97 km2) of water (4.41%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Deer Pond, Dixons Pond, Powerville, Rockaway Valley and Sheep Hill.[27]

The township borders the Morris County municipalities of Boonton, Denville Township, Kinnelon, Montville, Mountain Lakes and Rockaway Township.[28][29][30]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880405
1890326−19.5%
1900809148.2%
1910428−47.1%
192068459.8%
1930623*−8.9%
194081731.1%
19501,15541.4%
19601,99873.0%
19703,07053.7%
19803,2736.6%
19903,5669.0%
20004,28720.2%
20104,263−0.6%
2019 (est.)4,237[12][31]−0.6%
Population sources:
1880-1920[32] 1880-1890[33]
1890-1910[34][35] 1910-1930[36]
1930-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]
A winter scene in Boonton Township.

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 4,263 people, 1,575 households, and 1,150 families in the township. The population density was 517.2 per square mile (199.7/km2). There were 1,647 housing units at an average density of 199.8 per square mile (77.1/km2). The racial makeup was 92.35% (3,937) White, 1.55% (66) Black or African American, 0.12% (5) Native American, 3.99% (170) Asian, 0.05% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.54% (23) from other races, and 1.41% (60) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.18% (178) of the population.[9]

Of the 1,575 households, 33.8% had children under the age of 18; 63.1% were married couples living together; 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present and 27.0% were non-families. Of all households, 23.9% were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.17.[9]

24.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 16.2% from 25 to 44, 35.4% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.5 years. For every 100 females, the population had 97.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $117,333 (with a margin of error of ± $21,364) and the median family income was $135,781 (± $33,990). Males had a median income of $102,250 (± $17,348) versus $62,452 (± $17,486) for females. The per capita income for the township was $61,267 (± $12,232). About 3.8% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[40]

Based on data from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey, Boonton Township had a per capita income of $61,267 (ranked 50th in the state), compared to per capita income in Morris County of $47,342 and statewide of $34,858.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 4,287 people, 1,476 households, and 1,157 families residing in the township. The population density was 508.9 people per square mile (196.6/km2). There were 1,510 housing units at an average density of 179.2 per square mile (69.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.00% White, 1.19% African American, 0.05% Native American, 4.08% Asian, 0.63% from other races, and 1.05% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.15% of the population.[38][39]

There were 1,476 households, out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.1% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.18.[38][39]

In the township the population was spread out, with 24.9% under the age of 18, 4.9% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $91,753, and the median income for a family was $102,944. Males had a median income of $77,133 versus $46,302 for females. The per capita income for the township was $45,014. About 0.9% of families and 1.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.5% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.[38][39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Boonton Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[42] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][43] At an annual reorganization meeting held in January after each election, a Mayor (formally described as Chairperson) and Deputy Mayor are selected by the Township Committee from among its members.[44]

As of 2020, members of the Boonton Township Committee are Mayor Thomas R. Donadio (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2020), Deputy Mayor William Klingener (R, term on committee ends 2022; term as deputy mayor ends 2020), Paul Allieri (R, 2022), Patricia Collins (R, 2021; appointed to serve an unexpired term), Brian Honan (R, 2020; elected to serve an unexpired term).[3][45][46][47][48][49][50]

Patricia Collins was chosen in January 2020 by the Township Committee from a group of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2021 that had been held by Michele Rankin until her resignation from office effective in December 2019.[51]

In December 2018, the Township Committee selected Brian Honan from a list of candidates submitted by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2020 that had been vacated the previous month by Robert A. Rizzo, who resigned from office; Honan served on an interim basis until the November 2019 general election, when he was elected to serve the balance of the term of office.[52][53][48]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Boonton Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[54] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][55][56]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[57] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[58] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[59][60]

For the 2020–2021 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and in the General Assembly by Brian Bergen (R, Denville) and Aura K. Dunn (R, Mendham Borough).[61][62]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of County Commissioners, who are elected at-large in partisan elections, to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Commissioner Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[63] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[64] As of 2021, Morris County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2021),[65] Commissioner Deputy Director Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2021),[66] John Krickus (R, Washington Township, 2021),[67] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2022),[68] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (R, Roxbury, 2022),[69] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2022),[70] and Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, 2023).[71] [72]

Tayfun Selen was elected by a county Republican convention to the vacant seat of Heather Darling, who was elected Morris County Surrogate in 2019.[73] He served the remainder of her term which ended in 2020 and was elected to a full three-year term in the November general election that year.[74]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[75] As of 2021, they are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany, 2023),[76] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2022)[77] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[78]

Elections[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,061 registered voters in Boonton Township, of which 558 (18.2%) were registered as Democrats, 1,386 (45.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,114 (36.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[79]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 61.4% of the vote (1,430 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.4% (870 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (28 votes), among the 2,341 ballots cast by the township's 3,185 registered voters (13 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 73.5%.[80][81] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 59.2% of the vote (1,439 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.0% (949 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (27 votes), among the 2,431 ballots cast by the township's 3,199 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.0%.[82] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 62.4% of the vote (1,480 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 36.3% (860 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (25 votes), among the 2,372 ballots cast by the township's 3,083 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.9.[83]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 75.3% of the vote (1,077 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 23.2% (332 votes), and other candidates with 1.5% (22 votes), among the 1,454 ballots cast by the township's 3,199 registered voters (23 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 45.5%.[84][85] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.9% of the vote (1,126 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.7% (480 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.2% (107 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (12 votes), among the 1,735 ballots cast by the township's 3,131 registered voters, yielding a 55.4% turnout.[86]

Education[edit]

The Boonton Township School District serves students in public school for pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at Rockaway Valley School. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 429 students and 39.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.7:1.[87]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Mountain Lakes High School, in Mountain Lakes, as part of a sending/receiving relationship agreement in place with the Mountain Lakes Schools.[88][89] As of the 2017–18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 680 students and 61.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.0:1.[90]

Transportation[edit]

County Route 511 in Boonton Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 35.59 miles (57.28 km) of roadways, of which 28.97 miles (46.62 km) were maintained by the municipality and 6.62 miles (10.65 km) by Morris County.[91]

No Interstate, U.S. or state highways pass through Boonton Township. The most significant road directly serving the township is County Route 511. However, Interstate 287 and U.S. Route 202 are accessible in neighboring municipalities.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Boonton Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Boonton Township. Accessed March 20, 2020. "The Township government consists of a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee members are elected for a three-year term. The Chairman and Vice-chairman serve as the Mayor and Deputy Mayor, respectively and are selected by the Township Committee."
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Administration, Boonton Township. Accessed March 20, 2020.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Boonton Township. Accessed March 20, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 117.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Boonton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Boonton township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Boonton township Archived 2014-08-21 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Boonton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  15. ^ ZIP Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 27, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Boonton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 191. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  22. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1867, April 11. Boonton Township is established from Pequannock.... 1924, March 3. Mountain Lakes Borough is established from Boonton and Hanover Township."
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  24. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 52. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  25. ^ Staff. "The Top 20 Towns in New Jersey", New Jersey Monthly, August 15, 2011. Accessed January 7, 2013.
  26. ^ Ricker, Jean. Our History, Boonton Township. Accessed March 20, 2020.
  27. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  28. ^ Areas touching Boonton Township, MapIt. Accessed March 12, 2020.
  29. ^ Morris County Municipalities Map, Morris County, New Jersey Department of Planning and Preservation. Accessed March 4, 2020.
  30. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  31. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  32. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  33. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 17, 2012. For 1890 population for Boonton Township is listed as 3,307, which included the population of part of Boonton City of 2,981, with the population for Boonton Township alone calculated via subtraction.
  34. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 17, 2012. For 1890 a population of 3,307 is listed.
  35. ^ Lundy, F. L.; Fitzgerald, Thomas F.; Gosson, Louis C.; Fitzgerald, Josephine A.; Dullard, John P.; Gribbins, J. Joseph. Fitzgerald's legislative manual, State of New Jersey, Volume 139, p. 163. J.A. Fitzgerald, 1915. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  36. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  37. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  38. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Boonton township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2004-01-16 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Boonton township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  40. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Boonton township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  41. ^ Median Household, Family, Per-Capita Income: State, County, Municipality and Census Designated Place (CDP) With Municipalities Ranked by Per Capita Income; 2010 5-year ACS estimates, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 3, 2020.
  42. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  43. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  44. ^ About Us, Boonton Township. Accessed September 10, 2019. "The Township government consists of a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee members are elected for a three-year term. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are selected by the Township Committee."
  45. ^ 2019 Municipal User Friendly Budget for Township of Boonton, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 20, 2020.
  46. ^ Morris County Manual 2020, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed June 3, 2020.
  47. ^ Morris County Municipal Elected Officials For The Year 2020, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated March 17, 2020. Accessed June 3, 2020.
  48. ^ a b General Election November 5, 2019, Official Results, Morris County, New Jersey, updated November 15, 2019. Accessed January 31, 2020.
  49. ^ General Election Winners List For November 6, 2018, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed January 1, 2019.
  50. ^ General Election November 7, 2017 Official Results, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 17, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  51. ^ Meeting Minutes for January 8, 2020, Township of Boonton. Accessed March 20, 2020. "Township Committee Vacancy Mr. Cabana advised that he received three names from the Boonton Township Republican County Committee of individuals interested in filling the vacancy on the Township Committee created by the resignation of Michele Rankin which was effective December 31, 2019.... Vice Chairman Klingener moved the appointment of Patricia Collins to fill the unexpired term. The motion was seconded by Mr. Honan and unanimously carried on a roll call vote."
  52. ^ Township Committee Regular Meeting Minutes November 27, 2018, Township of Boonton. Accessed September 10, 2019. "On a motion by Mrs. Rankin, seconded by Mr. Allieri and so carried the resignation of Robert Rizzo was accepted by the Township Committee."
  53. ^ Township Committee Regular Meeting Minutes December 10, 2018, Township of Boonton. Accessed September 10, 2019. "Committee Member Rankin moved Resolution 18-151, Appointment of Brian Honan to fill the vacant Township Committee seat, which is appended to the minutes of this meeting. The motion was seconded by Mr. Klingener and unanimously carried on a roll call vote."
  54. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  55. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  56. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  57. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  58. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  59. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  60. ^ Senators of the 116th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed April 17, 2019. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  61. ^ Legislative Roster 2020-2021 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 28, 2020.
  62. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 28, 2020.
  63. ^ [1], Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  64. ^ Morris County Manual 2019, Morris County Clerk. Accessed April 16, 2019.
  65. ^ Stephen H. Shaw, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  66. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  67. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  68. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021).
  69. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  70. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  71. ^ Tayfun Selen, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  72. ^ Commissioners, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  73. ^ Filler, Marion. "Morris County's next freeholder is…Tayfun Selen". Morristown Green. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
  74. ^ "2020 General Election Summary Report" (PDF). Morris County Clerk. Office of the Morris County Clerk. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
  75. ^ New Jersey State Constitution (1947), Article VII, Section II, Paragraph 2, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed October 26, 2017.
  76. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed April 16, 2019.
  77. ^ About Us: Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed April 16, 2019.
  78. ^ Morris County Surrogate Court, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  79. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  80. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  81. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  82. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  83. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  84. ^ "Governor - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  85. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  86. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County Archived 2012-10-17 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  87. ^ District information for Boonton Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  88. ^ Boonton Township School District 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed June 6, 2016. "The Boonton Township School District has one school, Rockaway Valley School, which houses a PreK through Grade 8 program for approximately 450 children. The district maintains a send-receive relationship with the neighboring Mountain Lakes School District, whereby our students attend Mountain Lakes High School."
  89. ^ Information/ MLHS Information, Boonton Township School District. Accessed January 3, 2017. "Boonton Township School District maintains a 'send-receive' relationship with Mountain Lakes High School.... Once enrolled in Mountain Lakes High School, the responsibility for the education of the student rests with the High School. While the Boonton Township School District pays tuition for all residents enrolled at the High School, the High School faculty, staff and administration bear the responsibility for all academics, student IEP's and 504's, extra-curricular activities and the students' general health, well-being and safety at school."
  90. ^ School data for Mountain Lakes High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  91. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  92. ^ a b Garber, Phil. "25th District Assembly and senate Independents clash with Republican incumbents", New Jersey Hills, October 25, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "In the Senate race, Independent Maureen Castriotta of the Landing section of Roxbury Township is vying for the four-year seat of Republican Sen. Anthony 'Tony' Bucco of Boonton Township.... They are competing against incumbents Michael Patrick Carroll of Morris Plains and Anthony M. Bucco of Boonton Township for the two two-year terms at stake."
  93. ^ Romano, Jay. "A Senate Tradition Faces Wide Attack", The New York Times, July 18, 1993. Accessed November 14, 2013. "But Senator John H. Dorsey of Boonton Township has invoked senatorial courtesy, whereby a state senator acting alone can block such an appointment."
  94. ^ Kelly Tripucka - Knicks Television Analyst Archived 2014-01-02 at the Wayback Machine, MSG Network. Accessed November 14, 2013. "Tripucka and wife Janice reside in Boonton Township, NJ and have three children: 11-year-old daughter Reagan and sons Jake, 18, and Travis, 20, who attend college and play lacrosse."
  95. ^ O'Neill, Dan. "Tripucka's sports dream runs in the family", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, May 29, 2012. Accessed November 14, 2013. "Growing up in Boonton Township, N.J., Travis Tripucka wanted to play basketball. Specifically, he wanted to play basketball at the University of Notre Dame, just like his dad. His dad is Kelly Tripucka, among the more celebrated athletes ever to come out of Notre Dame."

External links[edit]