Borel fixed-point theorem

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In mathematics, the Borel fixed-point theorem is a fixed-point theorem in algebraic geometry generalizing the Lie–Kolchin theorem. The result was proved by Armand Borel (1956).

Statement of the theorem[edit]

If G is a connected, solvable, algebraic group acting regularly on a non-empty, complete algebraic variety V over an algebraically closed field k, then there is a G fixed-point of V.

A more general version of the theorem holds over a field k that is not necessarily algebraically closed. A solvable algebraic group G is split over k or k-split if G admits a composition series whose composition factors are isomorphic (over k) to the additive group or the multiplicative group . If G is a connected, k-split solvable algebraic group acting regularly on a complete variety V having a k-rational point, then there is a G fixed-point of V.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Borel (1991), Proposition 15.2

External links[edit]