Boris Dežulović

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Boris Dežulović
Sarajevo 19. 12. 09 Melodije uma i Neuma (4213159051).jpg
Boris Dežulović (center) together with Predrag Lucić and Benjamin Isović
Born (1964-11-20) 20 November 1964 (age 51)
Split, SFR Yugoslavia
Occupation Journalist and novelist
Nationality Croatian
Period 1984–present

Boris Dežulović (born 20 November 1964[1]) is a Croatian journalist, writer and columnist, best known as one of the founders of the now defunct satirical magazine Feral Tribune.

Dežulović studied art history at the University of Split.[2] Along with Viktor Ivančić and Predrag Lucić he was one of the three original members of the "VIVA LUDEŽ" trio of Split-based humorists who first began writing in 1984 and who founded the magazine in 1993.[3][4]

In 1999 Dežulović left Feral Tribune and joined the popular current affairs weekly Globus where he is one of their columnists.[1]

Dežulović is also a writer. In 2003 he published Christkind,[5] a science fiction novel about time travel which explores ethical dilemmas surrounding the possibility of killing baby Hitler. His second novel was published in 2005, titled Jebo sad hiljadu dinara[6] (lit. Who gives a fuck about a thousand dinars now), a satirical novel about the war in Bosnia, and a book of poetry titled Pjesme iz Lore (Poems from Lora). The latter was also published in German in 2008, titled Gedichte aus Lora.

Dežulović won the 2013 European Press Prize in the Commentator category.[7] He currently publishes weekly columns for N1, Oslobođenje and Portal Novosti.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Boris Dežulović piše za N1". Večernji list (in Croatian). 30 July 2015. Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  2. ^ "Boris Dežulović nasmijao Šibenčane" (in Croatian). 28 February 2011. Retrieved 5 October 2014. 
  3. ^ Kurspahić, Kemal (2003). Prime Time Crime: Balkan Media in War and Peace. United States Institute of Peace Press. p. 174. 
  4. ^ "Jedan svijet, jedan Feral: Gorki smijeh slobode ili Viva ludež!". Novi list (in Croatian). 8 February 2015. Retrieved 3 February 2016. 
  5. ^ http://www.culturenet.hr/default.aspx?id=22059
  6. ^ http://www.mvinfo.hr/clanak/boris-dezulovic-jebo-sad-hiljadu-dinara
  7. ^ "Boris Dežulović – winner of the European Press Prize 2013". mediaobservatory.net. 17 March 2014. Retrieved 20 March 2014.