Borne (novel)

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Borne
Borne (book cover).jpg
Paperback edition cover
AuthorJeff VanderMeer
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction
PublisherMCD
Publication date
April 24, 2017
Media typePrint
Pages336 pp
ISBN978-0-00-815918-4

Borne is a 2017 biotech apocalyptic novel[1] by American writer Jeff VanderMeer.[2]

Plot[edit]

In the ruins of a nameless city of the future, ruled by a giant grizzly called Mord, a woman named Rachel lives as a scavenger, collecting genetically engineered organisms and experiments created by the biotech firm the Company. Hidden in Mord's fur, she finds a sea anemone shaped creature she calls Borne.[3]

Background[edit]

VanderMeer had for a long time considered writing about growing up in the South Pacific, where he lived as a child. One day the image of a sea anemone came to him, along with a hand which he knew belonged to Rachel, that reached out to grab the anemone from the fur of a giant bear. From that image, the rest of the city assembled itself. Mord was influenced by Richard Adams's Shardik, and his never explained ability to fly was inspired by a character in Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus.[4]

Reception[edit]

The novel was highly praised, with The Guardian saying "VanderMeer’s recent work has been Ovidian in its underpinnings, exploring the radical transformation of life forms and the seams between them."[1] Publisher's Weekly said the novel reads "like a dispatch from a world lodged somewhere between science fiction, myth, and a video game" and that with Borne Vandermeer has essentially invented a new literary genre, "weird literature."[5] The New Yorker said the novel plunges the reader "into a primordial realm of myth, fable, and fairy tale."[6]

Sequels and possible film[edit]

In August 2017 VanderMeer released the novella The Strange Bird: A Borne Story.[7] The stand-alone story is set in the same world as Borne but features different characters. He's also reportedly working on a story called "Three Dead Astronauts", based on the dead astronauts mentioned in Borne.[7]

Paramount Pictures has optioned the film rights to Borne.[8]

References[edit]