Bornean black magpie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Platysmurus leucopterus aterrimus
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Corvidae
Genus: Platysmurus
Species: P. leucopterus
Subspecies: P. l. aterrimus
Trinomial name
Platysmurus leucopterus aterrimus
(Temminck, 1829)[1]
Synonyms
  • Platysmurus aterrimus

The Bornean black magpie (Platysmurus leucopterus aterrimus), also known as the black crested magpie, is a treepie in the family Corvidae. It is endemic to the Southeast Asian island of Borneo.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

The Bornean black magpie is a distinctive subspecies of the black magpie which is sometimes considered a full species, Platysmurus aterrimus.[2]

Description[edit]

The magpie is about 43 cm in length.[3] It has all-black plumage with a long, broad and graduated tail, a stout black bill, a tall, bristly crest, black legs and feet, and red irises. It has a taller crest than, and lacks the white wing patch of, the nominate subspecies.[1]

Behaviour[edit]

The magpie is a garrulous and sociable bird, often seen in family parties. It has a variety of whistling and chattering calls and is also a vocal mimic. It flies with shallow wing beats that produce a distinctive low throbbing whoo or boobooboo sound.[1][2]

Breeding[edit]

A nest found in the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in September 1981 was described as being about 20 cm across, built of sticks and sited 8 m up in a small tree.[3]

Feeding[edit]

The magpie is an arboreal, foliage-gleaning, insectivore and frugivore, also opportunistically taking small mammals and reptiles.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The magpie is found in the lowlands of Borneo, ranging in altitude up to about 300 m above sea level. It inhabits primary forest, including dipterocarp, kerangas and peat swamp forest, and is also found in secondary forest, overgrown tree plantations and scrub.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Black Magpie". HBW Alive. Lynx Editions. 2013. Retrieved 2013-11-16. 
  2. ^ a b c Phillipps, Quentin; & Phillipps, Karen (2011). Phillipps’ Field Guide to the Birds of Borneo. Oxford, UK: John Beaufoy Publishing. ISBN 978-1-906780-56-2. 
  3. ^ a b c d Smythies, Bertram E.; & Davison, Geoffrey W.H. (1999). The Birds of Borneo. Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia: Natural History Publications (Borneo) and the Sabah Society. pp. 630–631. ISBN 983-812-028-6.