Bosporthennis

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Bosporthennis
Bosporthennis is located in Cornwall
Bosporthennis
Bosporthennis
Bosporthennis shown within Cornwall
OS grid reference SW438364
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Penzance
Postcode district TR20
Police Devon and Cornwall
Fire Cornwall
Ambulance South Western
EU Parliament South West England
UK Parliament
  • St Ives
List of places
UK
England
Cornwall
50°10′22″N 5°35′16″W / 50.1728°N 5.5877°W / 50.1728; -5.5877Coordinates: 50°10′22″N 5°35′16″W / 50.1728°N 5.5877°W / 50.1728; -5.5877

Bosporthennis is a hamlet south of Treen in the civil parish of Zennor (where the 2011 census population was included ) on the Penwith peninsula in west Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.[1]

Antiquities[edit]

There is a scattered settlement of at least three courtyard houses dating from the Late Iron Age at the eastern foot of Hannibal's Carn. The best preserved has walls up to 1.5 metres high, with an adjoining paddock. Another has a late medieval cowhouse built inside its walls. Within the settlement there is a feature called the Bosporthennis Beehive Hut (grid reference SW43603607), which has been identified as an above ground fogou, similar to the round, subterranean chamber at Carn Euny. This identification is considered doubtful, Clark discussed the structure and concluded that it does not possess enough of the usual features of a fogou for it to be regarded as such.[2][3] The Bosporthennis chamber, made of corbelled stone, is 4 meters across and is connected to a smaller oblong chamber, originally the entrance, 3.3 meters by 2.1 meters, both are now roofless.

Bosporthennis Quoit (grid reference SW43563654) is a portal dolmen laying within a mound 6 metres across and 0.8 metres high. Three of the original four upright stones survive, of which one is 1.5 meters high, and the chamber is 1.5 by 1.3 meters. The capstone currently has a diameter of 1.6 meters, and is very round as it had been trimmed for use as a millstone. When excavated in 1872 sherds of pottery were found alongside calcined bones.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ordnance Survey: Landranger map sheet 203 Land's End ISBN 978-0-319-23148-7
  2. ^ E Clark (1961). Cornish Fogous. Taylor & Francis. pp. 109–116. 
  3. ^ MONUMENT NO. 423621 Archived November 10, 2013, at the Wayback Machine., Pastscape, retrieved 11 November 2013
  4. ^ Craig Weatherhill Cornovia: Ancient Sites of Cornwall & Scilly, Halsgrove, 2009

External links[edit]

Media related to Bosporthennis at Wikimedia Commons