Bouillon Chartier

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Bouillon Chartier
Chez Chartier 1.JPG
View of entrance of Chartier.
Restaurant information
Established1896
Food typeFrench
Dress codeCasual
Street address7, Rue du Faubourg-Montmartre
CityParis
CountryFrance
ReservationsNo
Websitebouillon-chartier.com

Bouillon Chartier, or simply Chartier, is a "bouillon" restaurant in Paris founded in 1896,[1] located in the 9th arrondissement and classified as a monument historique since 1989.[2]

History[edit]

The restaurant was created in 1896 by two brothers, Frédéric and Camille Chartier, in a former train station concourse. The long Belle Époque dining room has a high ceiling supported by large columns which allows for a mezzanine, where service is also provided.

It opened with the name "Le Bouillon" (lit. broth, or stock, but in this context, a type of brasserie;[3] originally a cheap workers' eatery that served stew), near the Grands Boulevards, the Hôtel Drouot, the Musée Grévin, and the Palais de la Bourse. The restaurant has had only four owners since opening.[4]

Service[edit]

The restaurant is open 365 days a year with a menu offering traditional French cuisine. The table service is provided by waiting staff dressed in the traditional rondin, a tight-fitting black waistcoat with multiple pockets and a long white apron.

The restaurant's popularity leads to lines in the courtyard or under the porch and sometimes on the sidewalk outside. Tables are shared between strangers. The bill is written directly on the disposable paper tablecloth at the end of the meal.[4] Serving stops at 11:30 PM.

In popular culture[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Listed in Baedeker, Karl (1907). "Restaurants". Paris and environs: with routes from London to Paris (15 ed.). London: Baedeker. p. 21. Retrieved 27 April 2010.
  2. ^ "Monuments Historiques et Immeubles protégés sur Paris 9e arrondissement" [Historical Monuments and Protected Buildings of the 9th district of the City of Paris] (in French). Bouillon Chartier.
  3. ^ Thomazeau, François; Ageorges, Sylvain (2007). The Brasseries of Paris. trans. Anna Moschovakis. New York Review of Books. pp. 54, 81, 181. ISBN 978-1-892145-49-9. Retrieved 27 April 2010.
  4. ^ a b Carisey, Regis. Hommes et établissements des métiers de bouche. Lulu.com. ISBN 9781291465747. Retrieved 3 August 2015.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 48°52′24″N 2°20′37″E / 48.87333°N 2.34361°E / 48.87333; 2.34361