Bowling railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the railway station in Bowling. For the station on the former Lanarkshire and Dunbartonshire Railway, see Bowling (L&D) railway station. For the station on the former Great Northern Railway in England, see Bowling railway station (West Yorkshire).
Bowling National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Bolan
Bowling 320319.jpg
Location
Place Bowling
Local authority West Dunbartonshire
Coordinates 55°55′52″N 4°29′34″W / 55.9311°N 4.4929°W / 55.9311; -4.4929Coordinates: 55°55′52″N 4°29′34″W / 55.9311°N 4.4929°W / 55.9311; -4.4929
Grid reference NS442736
Operations
Station code BWG
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Increase 32,502
2012/13 Increase 33,948
2013/14 Increase 55,820
2014/15 Decrease 55,014
2015/16 Increase 58,878
Passenger Transport Executive
PTE SPT
History
Original company Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Junction Railway
Pre-grouping CR and NBR
Post-grouping LMS and LNER
31 May 1858[1] Opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Bowling from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Bowling railway station serves the village of Bowling in the West Dunbartonshire region of Scotland. This station is on the North Clyde Line, 12¼ miles (20 km) west of Glasgow Queen Street.

The station is managed by Abellio ScotRail who also provide the train service. It was opened in 1858 by the Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway, though Bowling had received its first railway several years earlier courtesy of the Caledonian and Dumbartonshire Junction Railway (whose Bowling Pier terminal linked into the steamer service along the River Clyde).

The station was made famous by a painting by the renowned railway artist, the late Terence Cuneo, who depicted a then[when?] new Blue train (Class 303) heading westbound into Bowling, passing a steam engine, which the 303 had replaced, in a siding.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

On 8 September 1933, a passenger train collided with wagons on the line due to a signalman's error. Five people were injured.[2]

Services[edit]

2006/07[edit]

There is a daily half-hourly service eastbound to Glasgow Queen Street and beyond (usually Airdrie) and westbound to Balloch.

2010/11[edit]

There is a daily half-hourly service eastbound to Glasgow Queen Street and Airdrie (including one direct service to Edinburgh Waverley in the morning) and westbound to Balloch.[3]

During the operation of the interim timetable until sufficient Class 380s had entered service, the eastbound service terminated at Airdrie.[4]

2016[edit]

The service remains half hourly in the May 2016 timetable but on weekdays & Saturdays, westbound trains now end at Dumbarton Central and eastbound trains run to Cumbernauld via Clydebank. Sunday services run half-hourly to Balloch & to Glasgow Central Low Level (and thence alternately to Motherwell via Whifflet and to Larkhall).[5]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Kilpatrick   Abellio ScotRail
North Clyde Line
  Dumbarton East
Historical railways
Kilpatrick
Line and station open
  North British Railway
Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway
  Line continues as C&DJR
Line continues as GD&HR   Caledonian & North British Railway
Caledonian and Dunbartonshire Junction Railway
  Dumbarton Central
Line closed; Station open

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Butt 1995, p. 41.
  2. ^ Hoole, Ken (1983). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 4. Truro: Atlantic Books. p. 19. ISBN 0-906899-07-9. 
  3. ^ "National Rail Timetable 226; December 2010" (PDF). Retrieved 17 November 2010. 
  4. ^ "Interim timetable: Edinburgh to/from Helensburgh MONDAY TO FRIDAY Service" (PDF). Retrieved 3 January 2011. 
  5. ^ Table 225 & 226 National Rail timetable, May 2016

Sources[edit]

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137. 

External links[edit]