Bowral High School

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Bowral High School
BOWRAL..jpg
Address
Aitken Road
Bowral, New South Wales 2576
Australia
Information
Former names
  • Bowral District School
  • Bowral Intermediate High School
Type Secondary school
Motto Latin: Excelsior
(Higher)
Established 1929
(1906 as District School)
Opened 22 March 1930 (1930-03-22)
School board New South Wales Education Standards Authority
Principal Jason Conroy
Teaching staff 69
Gender Co-ed
Enrolment 850 (2018)
Colour(s) Blue and White
Slogan Exceptional learning opportunities for all
Website
[1][2][3]

Bowral High School is a public secondary school in Bowral, New South Wales, Australia. The school is one of two major public high schools in the Southern Highlands. The school was established in 1929 as a tribute to the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) of World War I. It has covered locations in Bowral, East Bowral, Mittagong, Colo Vale, and Hill Top.

History[edit]

The first public school in Bowral was established around 1868.[4] Secondary education was introduced in 1906 when a course was created at Bowral Public School to allow students to continue study after primary.[5][4][1] The secondary school was known as Bowral District School.[5][6][7][4] In 1915, the school had its first students pass the Leaving Certificate exams.[1] In 1920 the school was named Bowral Intermediate High School, and enrolled 120 students.[4] In 1921, the school received a visit from Lord Chelmsford.[8]

In the mid-1920s, plans were made by the Bowral Parents and Citizens' Association (PCA) to erect a separate high school building from land purchased by the New South Wales Department of Education.[9] The PCA raised funds to expand the area for the school, and continued to petition the Minister of Education to help fund the construction.[10][11] In February 1928, enrollment at Bowral Intermediate High increased to 303 students, 51 more than the previous year, prompting the PCA to continue pressuring the government to build the school.[12] By 1929, it had enrolled 389 students with 14 teachers.[1]

On 8 June 1929, the Minister of Education David Henry Drummond and the mayor of Bowral laid the foundation stone for the new high school building.[13][4][14] The land was a three-acre site on the outskirts of town.[15] The building would be a two-story structure similar to Goulburn High School, and would accommodate about 420 students and 11 classrooms. It had an assembly hall, staff rooms, men's and women's lavatories, open-air balconies, and other features, The original estimate from builder W. A. Gazzard was £20,000,[16] and later totaled about £25,000.[15]

On 22 March 1930, Drummond returned to officially open the high school.[17] [18] Herbert Cowie served as the first headmaster.[19][20] In December 1930, on the school's Speech Day, it was announced that the school's classification was raised to second class.[21] Cowie reported that 392 students had enrolled at the peak of the opening in March, with 339 enrolled for the current quarter. The school was separated between the Upper courses for the Leaving Certificate and the Lower courses for the Intermediate Certificate.[22] In 1935, Cowie died and the headmaster duties were passed to A.D. Watson.[23] Classes in those times included two language classes and a non-language class, the last of which was some sort of woodworking, geography and technical drawing for boys, and art and needlework for the girls. A petition was brought forth to add domestic science (cooking, dietetics, physiology, hygiene) and agriculture classes.[24] In 1937, Waston left the school.[23]

Following World War II, Bowral High School was the only public high school to service students preparing for the Leaving Certificate between Picton to Goulburn until the opening of Moss Vale High School in 1964.[25]

Governance, admissions, and costs[edit]

Bowral is a public co-educational school sponsored by the New South Wales Department of Education.[26] Bowral, along with Moss Vale High School follows the enrolment standards from the Education Reform Act 1990 where students are allocated based on the their designated residential zones. Exceptions are occasionally granted for non-resident students.[27] As a state public school, contributions are voluntary and are for expenses such as uniforms, school books and equipment, field trips and extracurriculars.[26] More general contributions are also made towards facilities and educational materials.[28]

School structure[edit]

Bowral covers Years 7 through Year 12.[29] At the end of Year 10, students can leave the school to begin full-time work, undergo education and training, or stay on to prepare for the Higher School Certificate (HSC) exam that is taken in Year 12.[30] The School Certificate is no longer awarded at completing Year 10, but is replaced with NSW Record of School Achievement.[31]

Curriculum[edit]

Bowral follows the curriculum as directed by New South Wales Department of Education. Students are taught in the subjects of "English, mathematics, science, technology, creative arts, personal development, health and physical education, human society and its environment, languages". Mandatory courses are set by the New South Wales Education Standards Authority (formerly Board of Studies). The school also offers electives. The Board also endorses courses taken in Year 11 and 12 that are suitable for Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) and courses that are classified as Vocational Education and Training (VET). Some courses count towards both ATAR and VET.[31]

Sports and traditions [edit]

Bowral has grouped students into four houses: Belmore, Fitzroy, Gibraltar, and Hume. Each house is headed by a house captain and vice-captain[32] The houses occasionally compete against each other in sporting events.[33][34] The colours for each house are: Belmore (blue); Fitzroy (red); Gibraltar (yellow); and Hume (green).[35]

Since 1928, Bowral High School has competed annually against Goulburn High School in a series of sports matches for the R.S. Smith Cup. Sports have included rugby, association football, cricket, basketball, and netball.[36][37] In more recent years, the competitions have also included non-sporting events such as masterchef, spelling bees and computing.[38][39][40]

Campus[edit]

Bowral's main buildings include the original historical building built in 1929, a large 3-storey block built in the 1970s and a few more buildings from the 1980s and 1990s.[citation needed] Facilities on Bowral High include science labs, computer labs, a library, kitchens, textile rooms, industrial art labs, basketball courts, amphitheatre/COLA area, quad, canteen.[citation needed] In 2015, the school built a memorial garden to commemorate the centenary of the ANZACS.[41][42]

Notable alumni[edit]

Former headmasters and principals[edit]

A listing of principals from the school since its opening in 1930.[1]

  • Herbert Cowie (1930–1935)
  • Andrew Watson (1936–1937)
  • Sydney Barker (1938–1953)
  • Robert Wilson (1953–1965)
  • Stanley Clutterbuck (1966–1970)
  • Henry Waterhouse (1971–1974)
  • John Jeffery (1975–1978)
  • David McGrath (1978–1986)
  • Ray Perrau (1987–1991)
  • Lance Corr (1992–1994)
  • Kathryn Brennan (1995–2005)
  • Dianne Hennessy (2006–2009)
  • Kim Paviour (2010–2018)[48]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "School History". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  2. ^ "Bowral High School – Year 7 Survival Guide" (PDF). Bowral High School official website. 2018. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  3. ^ "Bowral High School" (PDF). NSW Department of Education. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Bowral High School – Foundation stone laid". The Scrutineer and Berrima District Press. 8 June 1929. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  5. ^ a b "The Bowral District School". The Robertson Advocate. 16 March 1906. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  6. ^ "Secondary Education in the Bowral District". The Robertson Advocate. 10 April 1914. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  7. ^ "Bowral District School". The Robertson Advocate. 30 January 1917. p. 3. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  8. ^ "Bowral District School". The Scrutineer and Berrima District Press. 22 February 1911. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  9. ^ "Bowral High School". The Labor Daily. 9 April 1925. p. 10. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  10. ^ "Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 October 1927. p. 18. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  11. ^ "Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 31 May 1928. p. 12. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  12. ^ "Bowral High School Accommodation". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 February 1928. p. 16. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  13. ^ "Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 15 May 1929. p. 16. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  14. ^ "New High School for Bowral". The Sydney Morning Herald. 7 June 1929. p. 14. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  15. ^ a b "Building and Construction: Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 24 December 1929. p. 6. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  16. ^ "Country News – Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 5 September 1929. p. 12. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  17. ^ "Bowral High School – Official opening on Saturday". The Southern Mail. 21 March 1930. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  18. ^ "Bowral High School – Official opening". The Scrutineer and Berrima District Press. 29 March 1930. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  19. ^ "Death of Mr. Cowie – Head master of Bowral High School". The Southern Mail. 11 June 1935. p. 2. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  20. ^ "Bowral High School – Official opening". The Sydney Morning Herald. 24 March 1930. p. 16. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  21. ^ "Bowral High School". The Sydney Morning Herald. 24 December 1930. p. 11. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  22. ^ "Bowral High School – Speech Day". The Scrutineer and Berrima District Press. 24 December 1930. p. 4. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  23. ^ a b "Headmaster of Bowral High School Farewelled". The Southern Mail. 17 December 1937. p. 3. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  24. ^ "Bowral High School – Domestic Science Course". The Southern Mail. 6 December 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  25. ^ "Bowral - History". www.highlandsnsw.com.au. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 
  26. ^ a b "Bowral High School - Schooling costs". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  27. ^ "Bowral High School – Moss Vale High School Criteria for non–local enrolment application" (PDF). May 2014. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  28. ^ "Bowral High School - General Contributions". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  29. ^ "Bowral High School - School years". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  30. ^ "Bowral High School - Year 10". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  31. ^ a b "Bowral High School - Curriculum". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  32. ^ "Bowral High School – 2018 Student Information" (PDF). Bowral High School official website. 2018. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  33. ^ "High School Sport". The Southern Mail. 6 May 1932. p. 2. Retrieved 18 July 2018 – via Trove. For the purpose of sport, Bowral High School is divided into four houses — Fitzroy, Gibraltar, Hume and Belmore. 
  34. ^ "Bowral High School Sports – Four records broken". The Southern Mail. 2 August 1946. p. 6. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  35. ^ "Bowral High School - BHS Athletics Carnival 2016". Bowral High School official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  36. ^ "High schools meet – Fine play witnessed for Smith Cup on Friday – Splendid football seen". Goulburn Evening Penny Post. 18 August 1937. p. 7. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  37. ^ "Bowral High Wins Cup – First Time in History". The Southern Mail. 8 August 1947. p. 7. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Trove. 
  38. ^ "GALLERY: Smith Cup stays in Goulburn". southernhighlandnews.com.au. 30 October 2013. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 
  39. ^ "Goulburn High School - Smith Cup". www.goulburn-h.schools.nsw.edu.au. Retrieved 15 August 2018. 
  40. ^ "Smith Cup stays in Goulburn". goulburnpost.com.au. 26 October 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 
  41. ^ Drapalski, Megan (26 November 2014). "Memorial garden for ANZACS". Southern Highland News. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 
  42. ^ Lee, Victoria (4 May 2015). "Remembering our Anzacs". Southern Highland News. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 
  43. ^ Moss, Stephen (1 October 2006). "Wisden Anthology 1978-2006: Cricket's Age of Revolution". A&C Black. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Google Books. 
  44. ^ Bain, Jim (17 July 2018). "A Financial Tale of Two Cities: Sydney and Melbourne's Remarkable Contest for Commercial Supremacy". UNSW Press. Retrieved 17 July 2018 – via Google Books. 
  45. ^ McClellan, Ben (15 March 2011). "Chaser star at White Ribbon do". Southern Highland News. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  46. ^ "About Jai – Biography – Jai Rowell MP". Jai Rowell MP official website. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  47. ^ Drapalski, Megan (11 February 2015). "Jai Rowell: Liberal MP running for the seat of Wollondilly". Southern Highland News. Retrieved 17 July 2018. 
  48. ^ Meyers, Jackie (14 July 2010). "Principal pursues her passion". Southern Highland News. Retrieved 13 August 2018. 

External links[edit]