Boxing (1980 video game)

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Boxing
Boxing Coverart.png
Developer(s)Activision
Publisher(s)Activision
Designer(s)Bob Whitehead[1]
Platform(s)Atari 2600
ReleaseJuly 1980
Genre(s)Fighting, Sports
Mode(s)Single player, Multiplayer

Boxing is an Atari 2600 video game interpretation of the sport of boxing developed by Activision programmer Bob Whitehead.[1] The game is based on Boxer, an unreleased 1978 arcade game from Whitehead's previous employer, Atari, Inc.[2] Boxer was written by Mike Albaugh who also wrote Drag Race for Atari, a game cloned by Activision as Dragster.[3]

Gameplay[edit]

Gameplay screenshot

Boxing shows a top-down view of two boxers, one white and one black. When close enough, a boxer can hit his opponent with a punch (executed by pressing the fire button on the Atari joystick). This causes his opponent to reel back slightly. Long punches score one point, while closer punches (power punches, from the manual) score two. There are no knockdowns or rounds. A match is completed either when one player lands 100 punches (a "knockout") or two minutes have elapsed (a "decision"). In the case of a decision, the player with the most landed punches is the winner. Ties are possible.

While the gameplay is simple, there are subtleties, such as getting an opponent on the "ropes" and "juggling" him back and forth between alternate punches.

Reception[edit]

Boxing was reviewed by Video magazine in its "Arcade Alley" column where it was described as "demonstrat[ing] Activision's willingness to strike out boldly in new directions" and praised for keeping things from "becoming needlessly complex" by making automatic punch-type selection for the player.[4]

Legacy[edit]

In 2011, an extended academic version of the game, called Clever Boxer, was developed as a benchmark for Game AI.[5]

The game made an appearance in an Season 8 episode of The Walking Dead, where Eugene was shown playing it just before the power went out.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hague, James. "The Giant List of Classic Game Programmers".
  2. ^ Stilphen, Scott (2005). "Bob Whitehead Interview". The 2600 Connection.
  3. ^ Spicer, Dag (November 12, 2010). "Mike Albaugh Interview" (PDF). Computer History Museum.
  4. ^ Kunkel, Bill; Laney, Frank (December 1980). "Arcade Alley: A New Era Begins - Activision Exploits Atari's Success". Video. Reese Communications: 12 and 105. ISSN 0147-8907.
  5. ^ Nasrinpour, Hamid Reza; Malektaji, Siavash; Aliyari Shoorehdeli, Mahdi; Teshnehlab, Mohammad (September 2011). "Deploying Fuzzy Logic in a Boxing Game Network". 6th Annual International North-American Conference on AI and Simulation in Games (GameON-NA). Eurosis. doi:10.13140/2.1.1110.3524.

External links[edit]