Boy Scouts of the Philippines

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This article is about the youth movement. For the military unit, see Philippine Scouts.
Boy Scouts of the Philippines
Boy Scouts of the Philippines.png
Location nation-wide, with the National Office in Manila
Country Philippines
Founded October 31, 1936
Founders
Membership 1,983,563
Chief Scout Rodrigo Duterte
National President Wendel E. Avisado
Secretary General Rogelio S. Villa
Affiliation World Organization of the Scout Movement, Asia-Pacific Scout Region
Website
http://scouts.org.ph/
WikiProject Scouting uniform template male background.svg
 Scouting portal

The Boy Scouts of the Philippines, BSP, is the national Scout association of the Philippines in the World Organization of the Scout Movement. It was "granted Recognition as a Member Organisation of the Boy Scouts International Conference...with effect from 1–10–1946" by virtue of certification signed by J. S. Wilson, Olave Baden-Powell, and D. C. Spry.

For most of the late 20th century and into the 21st century, the Boy Scouts of the Philippines was among the largest Scout organizations in the world in terms of membership count (usually behind the Boy Scouts of America and the co-ed Gerakan Pramuka Indonesia), largely due to the organization's dependence on the Department of Education.

For most of its existence, the Boy Scouts of the Philippines was a private organization. However, this status has been officially and legally reversed with finality by Philippine Supreme Court decisions in 1991 ("government-controlled corporation"), 2011 ("public corporation or a government instrumentality"), and 2012.

History[edit]

Boy Scouting in the Philippines began under American governance. Troops were organised by American servicemen, missionaries, and social and business leaders.

Lorillard Spencer Troop[edit]

In 1914 the Lorillard Spencer Troop was formed by United States Army Philippine Scouts lieutenant Sherman L. Kiser then serving in Zamboanga with the pacification forces. Kiser had been assigned to escort American widow and Christian missionary Caroline Suydam Spencer in Sulu. Mrs. Spencer's husband Lorillard Spencer and son Lorillard Suydam Spencer had been members of the BSA National Council. On Mrs. Spencer's suggestion, Kiser organised the Troop, which was named after Mrs. Spencer's son, as later was the Lorillard Spencer Trophy. Mrs. Spencer contributed funds for the Moro boys' uniforms and the construction of a Scout headquarters.[1] In 1973, six surviving members of the Lorillard Spencer Troop attended the Golden Jubilee Jamboree as guests of the BSP.

Boy Scouts of America Philippine Islands Council #545[edit]

In 1922, the Rotary Club of Manila took the initiative of communicating with the Boy Scouts of America National Headquarters in New York, proposing the formation of a BSA council in Manila.[2] The BSA National Headquarters responded by appointing an American clergyman who would be traveling to the Philippines, Samuel Stagg, as BSA "Special Field Scout Commissioner" to look into organization of a BSA Manila Council. On 5 October 1923, the Manila Council of the BSA was formed. The new Council was funded by various business, social, and civic organizations. The Founding and Charter Members were:

P. D. Carman, E. P. Brias, Manuel Camus, Samuel Stagg, C. E. Adams, William H. Douglas, J. P. Wade, E. S. Turner, George H. Seaver, C. Russell Zeininger, Clifton M. Beaty, H. A. Bordner, J. Hill, F. E. Hedrick, Albert J. Brazee, Honorio Poblador, Lim Sae Gim, Fr. F. A. X. Byrne, Jose E. Valdez, Arsenio N. Luz.

— Scouting for Filipino Boys, page 9

All of these men were prominent in the commercial, political, social, and cultural scene in Manila. Most were members of the American Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands, the Rotary Club of Manila, the Masons, the YMCA, the Elks, the Manila Army and Navy Club,[3] and other organizations at the same time.

In November 1923, the Rotary Club advised BSA Headquarters that the Council Board had been organized. On 27 December 1923, BSA Deputy Scout Executive Dr. George J. Fisher cabled the BSA's endorsement, chartering the Council as a first class council and giving it jurisdiction over the entire Philippine Islands, instead of just Manila as originally applied for, officially creating the BSA Philippine Islands Council #545.

Boy Scouts of the Philippines[edit]

The Boy Scouts of the Philippines was founded by the cooperative initiative of three men: Josephus Stevenot the true founder who performed the actual organizational work, Tomás V. Confesór who authored the National Assembly Bill which became the organization's document of incorporation, and Commonwealth of the Philippines President Manuel L. Quezon who signed the legislative bill into law as Commonwealth Act 111 on 31 October 1936. The other six so-called "founders" were government and business celebrities convinced by Stevenot to lend their names as charter members in the document of incorporation.

The Boy Scouts of the Philippines was inaugurated and started functioning on 1 January 1938.

In 1959 the Boy Scouts of the Philippines hosted the first World Scout Jamboree outside Europe and Canada. In 1973 the BSP Golden Jubilee Jamboree was also designated the first Asia-Pacific Scout Jamboree. These were the two most large-scale events in BSP history.

The 1973 BSP Golden Jubilee was dated from the founding of the BSA Philippine Islands Council in 1923. The 2014 BSP Centennial Jamboree was dated from the founding of the Lorillard Spencer Troop in 1914.

Timeline[edit]

Milestones in Philippine Scouting include:

  • 1910: First troops organised by Elwood Stanley Brown, Physical Director of the Manila YMCA.[4]
  • 1912: Elwood Stanley Brown recognised by Baden-Powell as "Chief Scoutmaster."
  • 1913: Troops organised by Mark Thompson, Antonio Torres, Domingo Ponce, and Francisco Varona.
  • 1914: Lorillard Spencer Troop organised in November in Zamboanga City by Sherman L. Kiser.
  • 1921: Scouting started at Silliman Institute under the auspices of its church. They applied for registration to BSA National Headquarters, New York, in 1922, and received their document in January 1923 (some eight or nine months before the creation of the BSA Philippine Islands Council).
  • 1923: Establishment of the Boy Scouts of America Philippine Islands Council in October.
  • 1931: Experimentation in Sea Scouting and Cub Scouting.
  • 1933: The Philippines' first participation in an international Scout event, with the BSA Philippine Islands Council delegation embedded in the BSA contingent to the 4th World Scout Jamboree in Budapest, Hungary.
  • 1934: Rover Scouting was introduced. The BSA Shanghai District was placed under the supervision of the BSA Philippine Islands Council.
  • 1936: The Boy Scouts of the Philippines was established by a legislative act. The first BSP President and Chief Scout was Josephus Stevenot.
  • 1937: The BSA Philippine Islands Council, meeting in October, decided on the handover of its properties and responsibilities to the nascent BSP.
  • 1938: The BSP was inaugurated by Pres. Manuel Quezon on January 1, and started functioning. Exequiél Villacorta was appointed the first "Chief Scout Executive" of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines, in imitation of the BSA Chief Scout Executive.
  • 1947: The BSP made its first participation in an international event, with the BSP contingent to the 6th World Scout Jamboree in Moisson, France.
  • 1953: The first Wood Badge course was conducted at BSP Camp Gre-Zar in Novaliches, Quezon City.
  • 1954: The first BSP National Scout Jamboree was held at Rolling Hills, Balarâ, Quezon City.
  • Dr. Mariano Villarama de los Santos served on the World Scout Committee from 1957 until 1959.
  • 1959: The 10th World Scout Jamboree was held at the National Scout Reservation, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, at the foot of Mount Makiling, in the province of Laguna. This was the first World Scout Jamboree outside Europe and Canada.
  • 1960: The Cub Scout program was revised to replace American symbols (e.g. Bobcat, Bear Cub, Wolf Cub, Lion Cub) with Philippine motifs (e.g. Kawan, Mother Usa, Chief Usa, Young Usa, Lauan, Molave, Narra, Leaping Usa).
  • 1961: The Boy Scout program was revised to replace American symbols (e.g. Eagle) with Philippine motifs (e.g. Maginoo,[5] Jose Rizal).
  • 1963: 24 members of the BSP delegation to the 11th World Scout Jamboree in Marathon, Greece, died in a plane crash in the sea off the coast of Mumbai, India. Streets in the South Triangle District of Quezon City were later named in their memory.
  • 1968: Boy Scouts, Rovers, and Scouters joined in the search-and-rescue operations for victims of the Ruby Tower collapse in August. For the services rendered by the Scouts, the BSP organization was awarded by President Ferdinand Marcos with a Presidential Gold Medal the following year.
  • 1970: Senior Scouting officially launched as part of the BSP program. It has three sections: Air (grey uniform), Land (dark green), and Sea (white).
  • 1971: Ambassador Antonio C. Delgado was elected Chairman of the World Scout Conference, becoming the first Filipino to hold this position.
  • 1972: BSP membership hit the one-million mark.
  • 1973: Golden Jubilee of Philippine Scouting (1923–73). The Golden Jubilee Jamboree and first Asia-Pacific Jamboree was held at the National Scout Reservation, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, Laguna. The jamboree song, "Kapatirang Paglilingkod," reflected the Bagong Lipunan regime of President Ferdinand Marcos.
  • 1974–75: The Cub Scout name is Philippinised: the Pilipino alphabet at that time did not include the letter C, so "Cub" was replaced with "Kab." However, since "kab" was not actually a Pilipino word, it was contrived as an acronym for "Kabataan Alay sa Bayan" and written in all caps.
  • 1975–86: In compliance with the orders of Pres. Marcos, the Boy Scouts of the Philippines was renamed "Kapatirang Scout ng Pilipinas" (literally meaning Scout Brotherhood of the Philippines). The Scout age groups were reduced from four to two. The Scout Oath and Scout Law were revised. A new Scout badge was devised. President Ferdinand Marcos took the title of Chief Scout, the first Philippine head of state to hold the title.
  • 1986: Golden Jubilee of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines (1936–86). In the aftermath of the People Power Revolution, the name Kapatirang Scout ng Pilipinas was abandoned and the organization reverted to its original name "Boy Scouts of the Philippines."
  • 1990–91: A program was created for pre-school boys and named KID Scouting. Since "kid" is English and not Filipino, it was contrived as an acronym for "Kabataang Iminumulat Diwa" and written in all caps.
  • 1991: 12th Asia-Pacific Jamboree, Philippine Scouting Center, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, Laguna.
  • 1992: The old BSP badge was reinstated.
  • 1993: The Philippines hosted the first ASEAN Scout Jamboree.
  • 1997: The 2nd World Scout Parliamentary Union held in Manila.
  • 1999: The first Venture Scout Jamboree was held on Ilian Hills, Iriga City, Camarines Sur, Bicol.
  • 2007: The BSP observed the world centennial of the Scout Movement.
  • 2009–10: The BSP hosted the 26th Asia-Pacific Jamboree, 28 December 2009 – 3 January 2010. This was the third APR Jamboree in the Philippines.
  • 2011: The BSP celebrated 75 years of Philippine Scouting.
  • 2013: The National Peace Jamboree held on Mount Makiling in Laguna, in Capitol Hills Scout Camp in Cebu, and the BSP's Camp Malagos in Davao.
  • 2014: Centennial (1914–2014) of the defunct Lorillard Spencer Troop. A "Centennial Jamboree" was held in three venues: Marikina City (Luzon), Cebu City (Visayas), and Zamboanga City (Mindanao).

Memorials[edit]

See: Scouting memorials in the Philippines.

Colegio de San Juan de Letran monument to Ramon Valdes Albano, Henry Cabrera Chuatoco, and Wilfredo Mendoza Santiago, who perished with BSP contingent to 11th World Jamboree.
Bust of Senior Scout Pathfinder Paulo Cabrera Madriñan of Pasay Council (in Paete, Laguna), who perished with BSP contingent to 11th World Jamboree.

Program sections[edit]

  • KID Scouting (Kabataang Iminumulat Diwa) is for boys 3 to 4 years old (in pre-school, but not kindergarten). They wear a light blue neckerchief.
  • KAB Scouting (Kabataan Alay sa Bayan) is for boys 5 to 10 years old (kindergarten through grade 3). They wear a yellow neckerchief.
  • Boy Scouting is for boys 10 to 12 years old (grades 4 through 6). They wear a green neckerchief.
  • Senior Scouting is for boys and girls 13 to 17 years old (grades 7 through 10). They wear a red neckerchief.
  • Rover Scouting is for young men and women 17 to 24 years old (grades 11-12 and college level). Rovers aged 24 and above are called Rover Peers. They wear a navy blue neckerchief.[6]

KAB Scout advancement program[edit]

  • Young Usa
  • Growing Usa
  • Leaping Usa [7]

Boy Scout advancement program[edit]

  • Membership Badge
  • Tenderfoot Scout
  • Second Class Scout
  • First Class Scout [8]

Senior Scout advancement program[edit]

  • Membership Badge
  • Explorer
  • Pathfinder
  • Outdoorsman / Airman / Seaman
  • Venturer / Air Venturer / Sea Venturer
  • Eagle Scout

Rover advancement program[edit]

  • Yellow Quadrant
  • Green Quadrant
  • Red Quadrant
  • Blue Quadrant
  • Chief Scout's Nation Builder

Scout ideals[edit]

Vision[edit]

(Pre-2016)

To be the leading provider of progressive, outdoor-based, non-formal education, committed to develop morally straight, disciplined, concerned, self-reliant citizens in the best tradition of World Scouting.

(Current)

Foremost in preparing the youth to become agents of change in communities, guided by the Scout Oath and Law.

Mission[edit]

(Pre-2016)

To inculcate in our Scouts love of God, country and fellowmen;
To prepare the youth for responsible leadership; and
To contribute to nation-building according to the ideals, principles and program of Scouting.

(Current)

To help the youth develop values and acquire competencies to become responsible citizens and capable leaders anchored on the Scout Oath and Law.

Scout Oath[edit]

(English)[9]

On my honor, I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my country, the Republic of the Philippines, and to obey the Scout law.
To help other people at all times,
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Panunumpâ ng Scout[edit]

(Filipino)[10]

Sa ngalan ng aking dangál ay gagawín ko ang buóng makakaya

Upang tumupád sa aking tungkulin sa Diyós at sa aking Bayan, ang Republiká ng Pilipinas, at sumunód sa Batás ng Iskawt;
Tumulong sa ibáng tao sa lahát ng pagkakataón;
Pamalagiing malakás ang aking katawán, gisíng ang isipan at marangál[11] ang asal.

Scout Law / Batás ng Scout[edit]

The original English version is the Scout Law of the Boy Scouts of America, used in the Philippines 1923–1976 and 1986–present. The official Filipino version was translated from the English BSA Scout Law.[12]

A Scout is Ang Scout ay
Trustworthy Mapagkakatiwalaan
Loyal Matapát
Helpful Matulungín
Friendly Mapagkaibigan[13]
Courteous Magalang
Kind Mabaít
Obedient Masunurin
Cheerful Masayá
Thrifty Matipíd
Brave Matapang
Clean Malinis
Reverent Maka-Diyós[14]

Senior Scout Code[edit]

As a Senior Scout,

I will live the Scout Oath and Law and the Senior Scout motto and slogan.
I will be familiar with the Constitution of the Philippines especially my rights and obligations as a Filipino citizen.
I will share in my responsibilities to my home, school, church, neighborhood, community and country.
I will deal fairly and kindly with my fellowmen in the spirit of the Scout Law.
I will work to preserve our Filipino heritage, aware that the privileges I enjoy were won by hard work, sacrifice, clear thinking, and faith of our forefathers.
I will do everything in my power to pass a better Philippines to the next generation.

Organizational hierarchy[edit]

  • The Chief Scout – Honorary position reserved by law for the President of the Republic of the Philippines.
  • The National Council – The statutory supreme authority of the organization. Meets once a year to elect the National President of the BSP and the National Executive Board Members.
  • The National Executive Board (NEB) – Meets as planned or as need requires.
  • The National President of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines – Elected by the National Council. De facto authority of the organization.
  • Members of the National Executive Board – Elected by the National Council.[15]
  • The National Officers.
  • The Secretary General – chief executive officer and secretary of the NEB. The little president. Hired by the NEB. Creates and controls the agenda of NEB meetings.
  • The National Office Directors and Regional Directors – Hired by the Secretary General.
  • Local Council Executive Board.
  • Local Council Chairperson.
  • Local Council Executive Board Members.
  • Local Council Executive – Hired by the Local Council Executive Board.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Although troops of Filipino boys had been formed earlier in the country's social, political and economic center, Manila, the story of Caroline Spencer, Sherman Kiser, and the Lorillard Spencer Troop, in time, became the standard story for the start of Boy Scouting in the Philippines, through its repeated citation in BSP books and articles, including the Diamond Jubilee Yearbook (1996, pp 40–42), Good Morning (2012, pp 26 & 28), and Scouting in the Philippines Centennial Magazine (2014, pp 10–11).
  2. ^ Diamond Jubilee Yearbook, 1996.
  3. ^ Gleeck, Lewis Edward Jr., 1976, Over Seventy-five Years of Philippine-American History: The Army and Navy Club of Manila, Manila: Carmelo & Bauermann, 1976.
  4. ^ Cf: Official Handbook for Boys, first edition, published by Doubleday for the Boy Scouts of America, 1911.
  5. ^ "Maginoo": Gentlemanly.
  6. ^ Formerly, Rovers wore a maroon neckerchief.
  7. ^ In 1960 to 1975, the Cub Scout ranks were: Young Usa Badge, Lauan Badge, Molave Badge, Narra Badge, and Leaping Usa Badge.
  8. ^ In the past, both Boy Scouts and Senior Scouts could attain the highest rank, Jose Rizal. In the present scheme, a Boy Scout would have to move to the Senior Scout program in order to make Eagle.
  9. ^ Same as the Boy Scouts of America Oath, except for the phrase "the Republic of the Philippines." In 1976–86, the Scout Oath of the Kapatirang Scout ng Pilipinas ran: On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout law, to help other people at all times, to keep myself physically sound, mentally alert, and morally upright.
  10. ^ Official Filipino version, translated from original English BSA Oath, and the phrase "ang Republiká ng Pilipinas" added.
  11. ^ "marangál": originally (before 1976), "tumpák"
  12. ^ The Scout Law of the Kapatirang Scout ng Pilipinas, 1976–86, ran: A Scout is Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Considerate, Courageous, Resourceful, Industrious, Disciplined, Self-reliant, and a Brother to all Scouts.
  13. ^ "Mapagkaibigan": originally (before 1976), "Magiliw."
  14. ^ "Maka-Diyós": originally (before 1976), "Mapitagan."
  15. ^ The President of the Girl Scouts of the Philippines is a Member of the National Executive Board of the Boy Scouts of the Philippines.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Scouting for Filipino Boys, Volume 1, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 1949.
  • Boy Scout Book, Volume 1, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 1972.
  • Diamond Jubilee Yearbook, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 1996. ISBN 978-971-91769-0-9
  • On My Honor: Stories of Scouts in Action, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 2001.
  • Good Morning!, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 2012.
  • Manual for Scoutmasters, Manila: Kapatirang Scout ng Pilipinas.
  • Troop Leader's Manual, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 1995, 2001, 2004.
  • Kawan Leader's Manual, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 2001, 2007.
  • Langkay Leader's Manual, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 2002.
  • Handbook for Boys, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 2002.
  • 13 and Above, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines.
  • Rover Scouting Program Guidebook, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines, 1992, 1995, 2004.
  • Philippine Scouting magazine, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines.
  • Annual Report, Manila: Boy Scouts of the Philippines.

External links[edit]