Brad Bombardir

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Brad Bombardir
Born (1972-05-05) May 5, 1972 (age 50)
Powell River, British Columbia, Canada
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 205 lb (93 kg; 14 st 9 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for New Jersey Devils
Minnesota Wild
Nashville Predators
National team  Canada
NHL Draft 56th overall, 1990
New Jersey Devils
Playing career 1994–2005

Luke Bradley Bombardir (born May 5, 1972) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey player who played for the New Jersey Devils, Minnesota Wild and the Nashville Predators in the NHL. He currently serves as the Minnesota Wild's Director of Player Development and Senior Director of Community Relations.

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

Growing up in British Columbia, Bombardir played minor hockey with the Powell River Paper Kings in the British Columbia Junior Hockey League from 1988 until 1990.[1] As a result of his play, in which he recorded 10 goals and 25 assists in 60 games, Bombardir was selected in the third round, 56th overall, in the 1990 NHL Entry Draft by the New Jersey Devils. He did not expect to be drafted and thus showed up at BC Place in a T-shirt and faded jeans instead of a suit and tie.[2] Prior to the draft, Bombardir was expected to enrol at the University of North Dakota but considered playing in the Western Hockey League for the Victoria Cougars.[3]

Professional[edit]

After graduating from the University of North Dakota with a degree in economic development, Bombardir began his professional career with the Albany River Rats in the American Hockey League (AHL).[4] In 1996, his second year with the team, Bombardir was selected for the American Hockey League All-Star team.[5] While entering his third professional season, an NHL lockout happened and Devils assistant coach Larry Robinson spent six weeks training the AHL team. When reflecting on the ordeal, Bombardir said: "I learned more from him in those six weeks than from any other coach."[4] However, Bombardir suffered a broken leg while chasing the puck and missed most of the 1996–1997 season.[4] He returned to the lineup for the 1997–98 season where he made his NHL during a 4–1 loss to the Washington Capitals. Coach Jacques Lemaire praised Bombardir after his debut, saying: "He played well. He was in control...We were confident when he was on the ice."[6] On April 15, 1998, Bombardir recorded his first career NHL goal in a 5–4 loss to the Buffalo Sabres.[7]

During the 1999–2000 season, Bombardir made his NHL post-season debut while Scott Niedermayer was suspended.[8] The Devils eventually won the 2000 Stanley Cup Finals and he brought the Cup to Powell River.[9] His play during the 2000–01 season earned him a three-year contract extension with the Wild after he posted a career-high 15 assists.[10] As well, although the Wild had been rotating captains each month, Bombardir became the first to serve two consecutive months in January and February.[11] In October 2001, Bombardir fractured his right ankle and was expected to miss two months to recover. The injury occurred during a 3-3 tie with the Edmonton Oilers when he was smashed into the boards by Ethan Moreau.[12] At the time of the injury, Bombardir was playing 25 minutes a game, more than any Wild player.[13] Upon returning to the team's lineup, he recorded his first goal in 104 games during a 5–3 win over the Anaheim Mighty Ducks on February 28, 2002.[10]

Bombardir returned to the Wild for the 2003–04 season where he was again named captain of the team in January.[14] In February, Bombardir and Sergei Zholtok were traded to the Nashville Predators in exchange for a third and fourth-round pick in the 2004 NHL Entry Draft.[15]

Post-career[edit]

In September 2006, Bombardir accepted a full-time position as the director of community partnerships for the Minnesota Wild.[16][17] Following this, Bombardir was appointed Director of Player Development in 2010.[18]

Personal life[edit]

Bombardir and his wife Heather have three children together.[19]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1988–89 Powell River Paper Kings BCJHL 30 6 5 11 24 6 0 0 0 0
1989–90 Powell River Paper Kings BCJHL 60 10 35 45 93 8 2 3 5 4
1990–91 University of North Dakota WCHA 33 3 6 9 18
1991–92 University of North Dakota WCHA 35 3 14 17 54
1992–93 University of North Dakota WCHA 38 8 15 23 34
1993–94 University of North Dakota WCHA 38 5 17 22 38
1994–95 Albany River Rats AHL 77 5 22 27 22 14 0 3 3 6
1995–96 Albany River Rats AHL 80 6 25 31 63 3 0 1 1 4
1996–97 Albany River Rats AHL 32 0 8 8 6 16 1 3 4 8
1997–98 Albany River Rats AHL 5 0 0 0 0
1997–98 New Jersey Devils NHL 43 1 5 6 8
1998–99 New Jersey Devils NHL 56 1 7 8 16 5 0 0 0 0
1999–2000 New Jersey Devils NHL 32 3 1 4 6 1 0 0 0 0
2000–01 Minnesota Wild NHL 70 0 15 15 42
2001–02 Minnesota Wild NHL 28 1 2 3 14
2002–03 Minnesota Wild NHL 58 1 14 15 16 4 0 0 0 0
2003–04 Minnesota Wild NHL 56 1 2 3 21
2003–04 Nashville Predators NHL 13 0 0 0 4 6 0 1 1 2
2005–06 Springfield Falcons AHL 1 0 0 0 0
AHL totals 195 11 55 66 91 33 1 7 8 18
NHL totals 356 8 46 54 127 16 0 1 1 2

International[edit]

Year Team Event   GP G A Pts PIM
1992 Canada WJC 7 0 3 3 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brad Bombardir". eliteprospects.com. Elite Prospects. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  2. ^ Yoos, Cameron (June 19, 1990). "Bombardir arrives dressed for success". Nanaimo Daily News. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  3. ^ Senick, Dave (June 20, 1990). "Cougars lay first bricks in WHL rebuilding job". Victoria, British Columbia, Canada: Times Colonist. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ a b c Gallagher, Tony (November 6, 1998). "Pride of Powell River having Devil of a time". The Province. Retrieved March 6, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Three Rats named AHL All-Stars". The Post-Star. April 13, 1996. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  6. ^ Ross, Sherry (October 5, 1997). "Capitals' punch KOs Devils". Daily News. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Rose, Sherry (April 16, 1998). "Brodeur is shaky, Devs not". Daily News. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Beacon, Bill (June 9, 2000). "Spare Devil glad to be there". The Vancouver Sun. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Where his heart is". The Province. June 12, 2000. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b "First goal helps career comeback". The Province. March 1, 2002. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ Jones, Tom (February 6, 2001). "Bombardir will remain captain". Minneapolis, Minnesota: Star Tribune. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Jones, Tom (October 15, 2001). "Bombardir fractures right ankle". Minneapolis, Minnesota: Star Tribune. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Bombardir likely to play this weekend". Star Tribune. December 22, 2001. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Back at captain". Star Tribune. January 2, 2004. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "From prey to Predators". The Province. March 7, 2004. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Wild adds ex-defenseman Bombardir to staff". The Bismarck Tribune. September 7, 2006. Retrieved March 7, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "CAREER CHANGE". The Vancouver Sun. December 20, 2006. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  18. ^ Andresen, Glen (June 24, 2010). "Bombardir Named Director of Player Development". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved March 7, 2021.
  19. ^ "Hockey Operations" (PDF). devilsmedia.com. 2016. p. 11. Retrieved March 7, 2021.

External links[edit]

Preceded by Minnesota Wild captain
Jan/Feb 2001
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minnesota Wild captain
Oct/Nov 2002
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minnesota Wild captain
Feb-Apr 2003
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minnesota Wild captain
January 2004
Succeeded by