Brad Gooch

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Brad Gooch at the 2009 Texas Book Festival.

Brad Gooch (born 1952) is an American writer.

Biography[edit]

Born and raised in Kingston, Pennsylvania, he graduated from Columbia University with a bachelors in 1973 and a doctorate in 1986.

Gooch is currently a Professor of English at William Paterson University in New Jersey. He has lived in New York City since 1971. His 2015 memoir Smash Cut recounts life in 1970s and 1980s New York City, including the time Gooch spent as a fashion model, life with his then-boyfriend filmmaker Howard Brookner, living in the famous Chelsea Hotel and the first decade of the AIDS crisis.[1]

Gooch is married to writer and religious activist Paul Raushenbush; they have one child.[1]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Gooch, Brad (2009). Flannery : a life of Flannery O'Connor. New York: Little, Brown. 
  • Billy Idol (novel)|Billy Idol
  • Zombie 00
  • Scary Kisses
  • The Golden Age of Promiscuity
  • City Poet: The Life and Times of Frank O'Hara
  • Jailbait and Other Stories
  • The Daily News (poetry)
  • Hall And Oates
  • Finding the Boyfriend Within
  • Dating the Greek Gods
  • Smash Cut

Essays, reporting and other contributions[edit]

  • (essay in) Boys Like Us: Gay Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories, Patrick Merla (ed.) Avon Books. 1996

Critical studies and reviews[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

His book Jailbait and Other Stories was selected by Donald Barthelme for a Pushcart Foundation Writer's Choice Award. His writing has appeared in the Paris Review, Partisan Review, Bomb, the New Republic, Harper's Bazaar, The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Out, New York, the Los Angeles Times Book Review, The Nation, Travel + Leisure, and American Poetry Review.

His most acclaimed work is a biography of the poet Frank O'Hara, City Poet. His book, Finding the Boyfriend Within, calls for gay men to cultivate self-respect by cultivating an imaginary lover.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Van Meter, William (April 8, 2015). "In the Gritty New York of the '70s and '80s, Not Exactly a Model Life". The New York Times. Retrieved April 10, 2015. 

External links[edit]