Brain Preservation Foundation

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Brain Preservation Foundation
Brain Preservation Foundation logo.png
Founded27 August 2010 (27 August 2010)[1]
FounderKenneth Hayworth and John Smart[2]
TypeUnited States IRS exemption status: 501(c)(3), ruling year 2010[1]
FocusBrain preservation
Area served
Global
Key people
President Kenneth Hayworth[2]
Websitewww.brainpreservation.org

The Brain Preservation Foundation is an American non-profit organization with the goal of promoting validated scientific research and technical services development in the field of whole brain preservation for long-term static storage, as well as working on the accessibility, affordability, and sustainability of this technology.[3] It also provides public education on topics such as the neural foundations of memory, brain scanning techniques, brain preservation, and mind uploading.

Prizes[edit]

In 2010, the Brain Preservation Foundation launched an inducement prize contest with the goal of improving the long-run preservation of human brains. The purpose of preserving a human brain is to allow the mind uploading of the preserved brain's long-term memories if the technology becomes available to do so in the long-run future.[4] The requirements of the Brain Preservation Technology Prize stated that the connectome of a brain had to be preserved in a way that would allow for long-term storage (>100 years).[5]

On February 9, 2016, the Small Mammal Brain Preservation Prize was officially won by the cryobiology research company 21st Century Medicine.[6] On March 13, 2018, the Large Mammal Brain Preservation Prize was officially won, again by 21st Century Medicine.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Donors – The Brain Preservation Foundation". Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  2. ^ a b "Advisors – The Brain Preservation Foundation". Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  3. ^ a b "Mission – The Brain Preservation Foundation". Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  4. ^ "Is An Identical Copy Of You, You?". NPR.org. Retrieved 2019-01-25.
  5. ^ "Tech Prize – The Brain Preservation Foundation". Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  6. ^ Shermer, Michael (2016-02-01). "Can Our Minds Live Forever?". Scientific American. Archived from the original on 2018-11-25. Retrieved 2018-12-23.
  7. ^ Blackmore, Sue (2018-03-14). "Brain preservation is a step closer, but how could it ever be 'you'? | Sue Blackmore". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2018-12-23.