Brampton railway station (Cumbria)

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Brampton National Rail
Brampton (Cumbria) railway station in 2006.jpg
Location
PlaceBrampton
Local authorityCity of Carlisle
Grid referenceNY550599
Operations
Station codeBMP
Managed byNorthern
Number of platforms2
DfT categoryF2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 17,821
2014/15Increase 19,174
2015/16Decrease 18,860
2016/17Decrease 17,708
2017/18Increase 18,540
History
Original companyNewcastle & Carlisle Railway
Pre-groupingNorth Eastern Railway
Post-groupingLondon and North Eastern Railway
19 July 1836 (1836-07-19)opened as Milton
1 September 1870renamed Brampton
1 January 1885renamed Brampton Junction
30 April 1890renamed Brampton
1 August 1913renamed Brampton Junction
18 March 1971renamed Brampton (Cumberland)
?renamed Brampton (Cumbria)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Brampton from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Brampton railway station is on the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway in northern England, serving the town of Brampton. The station is located about a mile southeast of the town, near the hamlet of Milton. The station opened in 1836 and the first Station Master was Thomas Edmondson who introduced cardboard tickets and later developed the ticket dating machine.

Staff were removed from the station in 1967, with the main buildings demolished in stages during the 1970s and 1980s. Until 1923, a short branch line, known locally as 'The Dandy', which was horsedrawn, ran into Brampton itself, terminating at Brampton Town railway station, and the present-day station was called Brampton Junction.[1] This line closed in 1923 and most of the route is now a public footpath.

The station was also the junction of another railway serving the local collieries owned by the Earl of Carlisle. Known as Lord Carlisle's Railway, this ran to a junction with the Alston Branch Line at Lambley.

Passenger services are provided by Northern, which also manages the station. It is commonly suffixed as Brampton (Cumbria) in order to distinguish it from the station of the same name in Suffolk.

Facilities[edit]

No ticketing provision is available here, so passengers must buy them on the train or prior to travel. There are waiting shelters on each platform and train running information is offered by timetable poster boards and telephone (there is a public payphone on platform 2). Step-free access is available to both platforms (which are also linked by footbridge), though the westbound platform requires a significant detour via public roads to reach from the main entrance.[2]

Services[edit]

The station in 1962

On Monday to Saturday day-times there is a two-hourly service in each direction with more trains during peak periods (ten each way in total). On Sundays there are six trains to Carlisle & five to Newcastle.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Backtrack May 2017, p. 285.
  2. ^ Brampton (Cumbria) station facilities National Rail Enquiries; Retrieved 26 January 2017
  3. ^ Table 48 National Rail timetable, December 2016

External links[edit]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Haltwhistle   Northern
Tyne Valley Line
  Wetheral
  Historical railways  
Low Row   Newcastle and Carlisle Railway
North Eastern Railway
  How Mill
Disused railways
Brampton Town   Brampton Town Branch
Earl of Carlisle's Waggonway
  Terminus

Coordinates: 54°55′59″N 2°42′14″W / 54.933°N 2.704°W / 54.933; -2.704