Brampton Jain Temple

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Brampton Jain Temple
Bhagwan 1008 Adinatha Swamy Jain Temple
Brampton Adinath Digambar Jain Temple Toronto Canada.png
Brampton Jain Temple in Brampton, Ontario
Religion
AffiliationJainism
DeityRishabhanatha
Governing bodyGyan Jain, Shri SS Jain Sangh
Location
LocationBrampton, Ontario, Canada
Brampton Jain Temple is located in Ontario
Brampton Jain Temple
Location within Canada
Geographic coordinates43°49′40.729″N 79°43′4.51″W / 43.82798028°N 79.7179194°W / 43.82798028; -79.7179194Coordinates: 43°49′40.729″N 79°43′4.51″W / 43.82798028°N 79.7179194°W / 43.82798028; -79.7179194
Architecture
Date established2011
Temple(s)1
Website
jaintemplecanada.com

Brampton Jain Temple or the Bhagwan 1008 Adinatha Swamy Jain Temple, is the first Jain temple in Canada constructed using traditional Indian architecture.[1] The temple is located at 7875 Mayfield Road in Brampton, ON Canada, L7E 0W1. The temple houses shrines for Rishabhanatha (also called Adinātha).

The Greater Toronto Area has the largest concentration of the followers of Jainism in Canada and has the highest number of Jain temples of all Canadian urban areas.[2]

History[edit]

There are about 10,000 Jains in Canada, mostly concentrated in one province.[3] Two-thirds of the Jain community is concentrated in the metropolitan Toronto area.[4] In 2011, the temple construction was overseen by Bhattarak Charukeerthi, Moodabidri from India.[5] Many people brought their own bricks to lay for the foundation of the temple.[6]

The temple celebrated its Pratishta Mahotsav in 2014.[7][8] In 2015, 2000 people visited the temple for its anniversary celebrations, which were marked by religious discourses.[2] MPP Dipika Damerla was present on the occasion to present Premier Kathleen Wynne's wishes to the Jain community.[9][10]

Architecture[edit]

The Jain temple is the first one in Canada to use traditional Indian architecture. The temple also has a Manastambh, the second Jain temple in North America to have one. A Manastambh, or Pride Pillar, indicates a loss of pride for the worshipper before entering the temple.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minor injury at building site after crane topples". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  2. ^ a b "As more Jains come, their temples flourish in Toronto". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  3. ^ Van Voorst, Robert E. (20 January 2016). RELG: World. ISBN 9781305888302. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  4. ^ Chapple, Christopher Key; Tirosh-Samuelson, Hava (2002). Jainism and ecology. ISBN 9780945454335. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  5. ^ "Foundation Laid For Jain Temple In Brampton". Archived from the original on 30 January 2016. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  6. ^ "Jainism Ahimsa News Religious Non-Violence Celebrities Literature Philosophy Matrimonial Institutions". Archived from the original on 25 March 2016. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  7. ^ "JAINA CONVENTION PROGRAM, DIGAMBER JINMANDIR SHILANAYAS CERE". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  8. ^ "HereNow4U.net :: Article Archive - Shree 1008 Adinath Digambar Jinbimb Panch-Kalyanak Pratistha-Mahamahotsav". HereNow4u: Portal on Jainism and next level consciousness. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  9. ^ "First Anniversary of Canada's First Shikharbandi Jain Temple in Brampton". South Asian Daily - The biggest South Asian Media House. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  10. ^ "Jainworld". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  11. ^ Wiley, Kristi L. (16 July 2009). The A to Z of Jainism. ISBN 9780810868212. Retrieved 24 January 2016.

External links[edit]