Brandin Cooks

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Brandin Cooks
refer to caption
Cooks in 2019
No. 13 – Houston Texans
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born: (1993-09-25) September 25, 1993 (age 27)
Stockton, California
Height:5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight:183 lb (83 kg)
Career information
High school:Lincoln (Stockton, California)
College:Oregon State
NFL Draft:2014 / Round: 1 / Pick: 20
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 5, 2020
Receptions:420
Receiving yards:6,029
Rushing yards:281
Return yards:61
Total touchdowns:37
Player stats at NFL.com

Brandin Tawan Cooks (born September 25, 1993) is an American football wide receiver for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Oregon State, where he received All-American recognition in 2013. He was then drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft. Cooks has also previously played for the New England Patriots and Los Angeles Rams.

Early life[edit]

Cooks was born in Stockton, California to Worth Cooks Sr. and Andrea Cooks on September 25, 1993. Worth Sr. died of a heart attack when Brandin was six years old and Cooks and his three brothers, Fred, Worth Jr., and Andre, were thereafter raised by their mother.[1] He attended Lincoln High School in Stockton, where he played high school football for the Trojans.[2][3] As a sophomore, he recorded 29 receptions for 600 yards and seven touchdowns. As a junior, he had 46 receptions for 783 yards and 10 touchdowns, while also collecting three interceptions on the defensive side of the ball. As a senior, he had 66 receptions for 1,125 yards and 11 touchdowns. Cooks was ranked by the Rivals.com recruiting network as the 26th-best wide receiver and the 240th overall prospect in his class.[4] He originally committed to play college football at the UCLA but changed to Oregon State University.[5][6] In addition to football, Cooks played basketball and ran track in high school.

College career[edit]

Cooks played at Oregon State from 2011 to 2013 under head coach Mike Riley.[7]

2011 season[edit]

Cooks recorded three receptions for 26 receiving yards in the 29–28 loss in his collegiate debut against Sacramento State.[8] On October 15, against BYU, he had three receptions for 90 receiving yards and his first collegiate receiving touchdown, which came on a 59-yard reception from quarterback Sean Mannion, in the 38–28 loss.[9] He played in all 12 games with three starts and recorded 31 receptions for 391 yards and three touchdowns. In addition, he returned kickoffs, averaging 22.4 yards per return on eight attempts.[10]

2012 season[edit]

Cooks started his sophomore season with six receptions for 80 receiving yards and one receiving touchdown in a 10–7 victory over Wisconsin.[11] Two weeks later, against UCLA, he had six receptions for 175 receiving yards and one receiving touchdown in the 27–20 victory.[12] In the following game against Arizona, he had nine receptions for 149 receiving yards in the 38–35 victory.[13] On October 13, against BYU, he had eight receptions for 173 receiving yards in the 42–24 victory.[14] On October 27, against Washington, he had nine receptions for 123 receiving yards and one receiving touchdown in the 20–17 loss.[15] On November 3, against Arizona State, he had six receptions for 116 receiving yards in the 36–26 victory.[16] Overall, he had 67 receptions for 1,151 yards and five touchdowns.[17] The combination of Cooks and Markus Wheaton created one of the most dynamic receiving duos in college football and Oregon State history. The two players combined for 158 receptions, 2,395 yards, and 16 touchdowns in the 2012 season.[18]

2013 season[edit]

Cooks started the 2013 season with 13 receptions for 196 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns in the 49–46 loss to Eastern Washington.[19] In the next game, against Hawaii, he had seven receptions for 92 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns in the 33–14 victory.[20] One week later, against Utah, he had nine receptions for 210 receiving yards and three receiving touchdowns in the 51–48 victory.[21] In the following game against San Diego State, he had 14 receptions for 141 receiving yards in the 34–30 victory.[22] He continued to perform well with nine receptions for 168 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns against Colorado in the next game, a 44–17 victory.[23] Cooks started October with 11 receptions for 137 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns against Washington State in the 52–24 victory.[24] In the following week against California, he had 13 receptions for a season-high 232 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 49–17 victory.[25] In the next two games, against Stanford and USC, he had receiving touchdowns in both games.[26][27] On November 23, against Washington, he had 10 receptions for 117 receiving yards and one receiving touchdown in the 69–27 loss.[28] In the regular season finale against Oregon, he had ten receptions for 110 receiving yards in the 36–35 loss.[29] Oregon State finished with a 6–6 record and qualified for the Hawaii Bowl.[30] Against Boise State, he had eight receptions for 60 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 38–23 victory.[31]

Overall, he had 128 receptions, 1,730 receiving yards, and 16 receiving touchdowns.[32][33] Cooks's receptions and receiving yards were Pac-12 records.[34][35] He was held to under 100 yards only four times and exceeded 200 yards in a game twice.[36][37][38] At the end of the season, he won the Fred Biletnikoff Award and was a consensus All-American.[39][40] He was the second Oregon State player to win the Biletnikoff Award, the first being Mike Hass in 2005.[41] He finished his collegiate career among the best in school history by being second in receptions, third in receiving yards, and first in receiving touchdowns.[42]

On January 2, 2014, Cooks announced that he would forgo his senior season and enter the 2014 NFL Draft.[43]

In addition to football, Cooks ran track at Oregon State. He earned a second-place finish in the 60-meter dash at the 2012 UW Invitational, clocking a personal-best time of 6.81 seconds.[44]

College statistics[edit]

Receiving Rushing
Year GP Rec Yds Avg Long 100+ 200+ TD Avg/G Att Yds Avg TD
2011 12 31 391 12.6 59 0 0 3 32.6 10 41 4.1 0
2012 13 67 1,151 17.2 75 5 0 5 95.9 19 82 4.3 0
2013 13 128 1,730 13.5 55 8 2 16 133 32 217 6.8 2
Total 226 3,272 14.5 75 13 2 24 86.1 61 340 5.6 2

Collegiate awards and honors[edit]

  • Biletnikoff Award (2013)[45]
  • Consensus All-American (2013)[46]
  • Hawaii Bowl Champion (2013)[47]
  • First-team All-Pac-12 (2013)
  • All-Pac-12 Honorable Mention (2012)
  • Pac-12 record for most receiving yards in a single season (2013)
  • 1st all-time career receiving touchdowns at Oregon State (24 touchdowns)[48]
  • 3rd all-time career receiving yards at Oregon State (3,272 yards)
  • 2013 NCAA leader in receiving yards (1,730 yards) [49]
  • 2013 Pac-12 leader in receiving touchdowns (16 touchdowns)[50]
  • 2013 Pac-12 leader in receptions (128 receptions)[50]
  • 2012 Pac-12 leader in yards per reception (17.2 yards)[50]

Professional career[edit]

Pre-draft measurables
Height Weight Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yard split 20-yard split 20-yard shuttle Three-cone drill Vertical jump Broad jump Bench press
5 ft 9 34 in
(1.77 m)
189 lb
(86 kg)
30 34 in
(0.78 m)
9 58 in
(0.24 m)
4.33 s 1.53 s 2.50 s 3.81 s 6.76 s 36 in
(0.91 m)
10 ft 0 in
(3.05 m)
16 reps
All values from NFL Combine

New Orleans Saints[edit]

Cooks was selected by the New Orleans Saints as the 20th overall pick of the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft; the Saints traded up from the 27th spot, giving their first and third-round picks to the Arizona Cardinals in return for Arizona's first-round pick, in order to get Cooks.[51] Cooks was the highest drafted player out of Oregon State since Ken Carpenter went 13th overall in the first round of the 1950 NFL Draft.[52]

2014 season: Rookie year[edit]

On May 18, 2014, the Saints signed Cooks to a four-year contract worth $8.3 million.[53]

In his first NFL game, Cooks caught seven passes for 77 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown and had one rush for 18 yards in a 37–34 overtime road loss to the Atlanta Falcons.[54][55][56] This made Cooks the youngest player, at 20 years and 347 days, to catch a touchdown pass since Reidel Anthony caught one against the Miami Dolphins on September 28, 1997, at 20 years and 343 days.[57] In Week 3, against the Minnesota Vikings, he had eight receptions for 74 receiving yards in the 20–9 victory.[58] In Week 5, against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he had a season-high nine receptions for 56 receiving yards in the 37–31 victory.[59] During Week 8 against the Green Bay Packers, Cooks recorded six catches for 94 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown to go along with a four-yard rushing touchdown in the 44–23 road victory.[60] Two weeks later against the San Francisco 49ers, he caught five passes for 90 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 27–24 loss.[61] In the next game against the Cincinnati Bengals, Cooks had five receptions for 50 receiving yards and a five-yard rush before leaving the eventual 27–10 defeat with an injury. It was later revealed that he broke his thumb, prematurely ending his rookie season.[62]

Cooks finished his rookie season with 53 receptions for 550 receiving yards and three receiving touchdowns to go along with seven carries for 73 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[63]

2015 season[edit]

Cooks runs with the football as a member of the New Orleans Saints during an August 2015 preseason game vs. the Baltimore Ravens.
Cooks with the New Orleans Saints in 2015

Cooks began the 2015 season as the number-one wide receiver for the Saints.[64] In the first four games of the season, he totaled 20 receptions for 215 receiving yards as the team started 1–3.[65] He caught for over 100 yards in a game for the first time in his career in the Week 5 game against the Philadelphia Eagles, where he had five catches for 107 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 39–17 loss.[66] Three weeks later, Cooks caught six passes for 88 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns in a 52–49 victory over the New York Giants.[67] Cooks's two receiving touchdowns were part of a record-tying seven touchdowns thrown by Drew Brees.[68] In the next game against the Tennessee Titans, he recorded four receptions for 71 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 34–28 overtime loss.[69] The following week, Cooks had five passes for 98 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns along with an 11-yard rush during a 47–14 loss to the Washington Redskins.[70] During Week 13, he recorded six receptions for 104 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in a 41–38 loss against the Carolina Panthers.[71] In Weeks 15 and 16 combined, Cooks had 15 catches for 247 yards and two receiving touchdowns against the Detroit Lions and Jacksonville Jaguars.[72][73] He was relatively quiet in the Saints' Week 17 game against the Atlanta Falcons with five catches for 22 receiving yards as the Saints finished 7–9 and missed the playoffs.[74][75]

Cooks finished his second professional season with 84 catches for 1,138 yards and nine touchdowns, leading the Saints in all of those categories.[76]

2016 season[edit]

Before the 2016 season, Cooks was pegged as a breakout candidate by ESPN.[77] He lived up to the pre-season hype when he had six receptions for 143 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns and an 11-yard rush during the season-opening 35–34 loss against the Oakland Raiders. He caught a 98-yard touchdown pass in the third quarter to set the Saints' franchise record for the longest play.[78] Cooks, along with Willie Snead IV and rookie Michael Thomas, finished the day with 373 receiving yards combined, the most ever by a New Orleans trio in a loss.[79] During Week 6 against the Carolina Panthers, Cooks had seven passes for 173 receiving yards, which included a 87-yard touchdown reception, in the 41–38 victory.[80] In the next game against the Kansas City Chiefs, he recorded seven receptions for 58 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 27–21 loss.[81] The following week, Cooks recorded four receptions for 44 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in a 25–20 victory over the Seattle Seahawks.[82] Two weeks later, he caught three passes for 98 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in a 25–23 loss to the Denver Broncos.[83] After a Week 12 49–21 win over the Los Angeles Rams, in which he was not targeted for a single pass,[84] Cooks voiced his frustration by saying, "Closed mouths don't get fed."[85] During a Week 15 48–41 road victory against the Arizona Cardinals, he caught seven passes for a career-high 186 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns, one for 65 yards and one for 45 yards.[86] In the next game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Cooks recorded five receptions for 98 receiving yards in the 31–24 victory.[87] In what would be his final game with the Saints, he had three receptions for 19 receiving yards in the 38–32 loss to the Atlanta Falcons in Week 17.[88] The Saints finished with a 7–9 record and missed the playoffs.[89]

Cooks finished the 2016 season catching 78 receptions for a then career-high in receiving yards with 1,173 and eight touchdowns. Despite the fact that his targets dropped from 129 in 2015 to 117 in 2016, his 10.0 yards per target ranked sixth among NFL wide receivers.[90][91]

New England Patriots[edit]

On March 10, 2017, the New England Patriots traded their 2017 first-round (used on Ryan Ramczyk) and third-round draft picks (one was originally acquired from the Cleveland Browns in exchange for Jamie Collins) to the Saints for Cooks and a 2017 fourth-round draft pick.[92][93][94][95] On April 29, 2017, the Patriots picked up the fifth-year option on Cooks' contract.[96]

On September 7, 2017, Cooks made his Patriots debut against the Kansas City Chiefs in the NFL Kickoff Game. He had three receptions for 88 receiving yards in the 42–27 loss.[97] During a Week 3 36–33 victory over the Houston Texans, Cooks had five receptions for 131 receiving yards and scored his first two touchdowns as a Patriot, including a 25-yard game winner with 23 seconds left; after the game-winning touchdown, he scored on the ensuing two-point conversion.[98] Two weeks later against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Cooks caught five passes for 85 receiving yards in the 19–14 road victory.[99] In the next game, he had six receptions for 93 receiving yards in a 24–17 victory over the New York Jets. [100]The following week, Cooks recorded four receptions for 65 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in a 23–7 victory over the Atlanta Falcons.[101] After a Week 9 bye, the Patriots went on the road to face the Denver Broncos. In that game, Cooks caught six passes for 74 receiving yards as the Patriots won by a score of 41–16.[102] In the next game against the Oakland Raiders at Estadio Azteca, he had six receptions for 149 yards and a season long 64-yard touchdown in a 33–8 victory.[103] The following week against the Miami Dolphins, Cooks caught six passes for 83 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown and had an 11-yard rush in the 35–17 victory. Through Week 12 of the 2017 season, he led all players in receptions of 40+ yards, with six.[104] Three weeks later against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Cooks recorded four receptions for 60 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 27–24 road victory.[105] In the regular-season finale against the Jets, he caught five passes for 79 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown and rushed thrice for eight yards as the Patriots won by a score of 26–6.[106]

Cooks finished his only season with the Patriots with 65 receptions for 1,082 receiving yards and seven receiving touchdowns. In addition, he rushed nine times for 40 yards.[107] Cooks and Rob Gronkowski combined to form a 1,000-yard receiving duo for the Patriots, which was their first since 2011.[108] Cooks finished second to Gronkowski in receptions, receiving yards, and receiving touchdowns on the season.[109]

The Patriots finished atop the AFC East with a 13–3 record and earned the #1-seed in the AFC.[110] In the Divisional Round against the Tennessee Titans, Cooks caught three passes for 32 receiving yards in the 35–14 victory.[111] In the AFC Championship game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, he had six receptions for 100 receiving yards in the 24–20 victory.[112] During Super Bowl LII against the Philadelphia Eagles, he caught a 23-yard reception and had a one-yard rush, but left the game early in the second quarter with a concussion after absorbing a hit from Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins. He was placed on concussion protocol and took no further part in the Super Bowl as the Patriots lost by a score of 41–33.[113][114]

Los Angeles Rams[edit]

On April 3, 2018, the New England Patriots traded Cooks and a fourth-round draft pick to the Los Angeles Rams for a first-round pick (used on Isaiah Wynn) and a sixth-round pick.[115] This also reunited him with former Oregon State teammate Sean Mannion. On July 17, 2018, Cooks signed a five-year, $81 million extension with the Rams with $50.5 million guaranteed.[116]

2018 season[edit]

In his Rams debut, Cooks caught five passes for 87 receiving yards as the Rams defeated the Oakland Raiders on the road by a score of 33–13 on Monday Night Football.[117] In the next game against the Arizona Cardinals, he had seven receptions for 159 receiving yards in the 34–0 shutout victory.[118] Two weeks later against the Minnesota Vikings, Cooks had seven receptions for 116 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown along with a 10-yard rush in the 38–31 victory.[119] During Week 7 against the San Francisco 49ers, he caught four passes for 64 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown along with a seven-yard rush in the 39–10 road victory.[120] Two weeks later against his former team, the New Orleans Saints, Cooks caught six receptions for 114 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 45–35 road loss.[121] In the next game against the Seattle Seahawks, he had another great outing, catching ten passes for 100 receiving yards and rushing for a nine-yard touchdown in a 36–31 victory.[122] During Week 11 against the Kansas City Chiefs, Cooks caught eight passes for 107 receiving yards in the narrow 54–51 victory.[123] After a Week 12 bye, the Rams went on the road to face the Detroit Lions. He finished the 30–16 road victory with four receptions for 62 receiving yards and eclipsed 1,000 receiving yards on the season.[124] In the process, Cooks became the first player in NFL history with 1,000 receiving yards in three consecutive seasons with three different teams. During the regular-season finale against the 49ers, he caught five passes for 62 yards and two touchdowns as the Rams won 48–32.[125]

Cooks finished the regular season with 80 receptions for a career-high 1,204 receiving yards and five receiving touchdowns. He also rushed 10 times for 68 yards and a rushing touchdown.[126]

The Rams finished atop the NFC West and earned the #2-seed for the NFC Playoffs.[127] In the Divisional Round against the Dallas Cowboys, Cooks recorded four catches for 65 receiving yards in a 30–22 victory.[128] In the NFC Championship Game against the Saints, Cooks had seven receptions for 107 receiving yards in a 26–23 overtime road victory to reach Super Bowl LIII.[129] It was his second straight Super Bowl appearance and the Rams faced off against Cooks' former team, the New England Patriots. In the Super Bowl, Cooks caught eight passes for 120 receiving yards, but the Rams lost 13–3 in the lowest-scoring Super Bowl in history.[130] Cooks had three chances at scoring pivotal receiving touchdowns in the game. On the first attempt, Cooks was wide open in the endzone and the play was broken up by Jason McCourty at the end. The second was a drop by Cooks in the endzone when the Rams were trailing by seven with over four minutes left. The last occurred on the next play when Goff threw a pressured pass to Cooks that ended up being under thrown and picked off by Stephon Gilmore.[131][132]

2019 season[edit]

During Week 2 against the New Orleans Saints, Cooks caught three passes for 74 receiving yards and a receiving touchdown in the 27–9 victory.[133][134] In the next game against the Cleveland Browns, Cooks caught eight passes for 112 receiving yards and had an eight-yard rush in the 20–13 road victory on NBC Sunday Night Football.[135] In the next game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he caught six passes for 71 yards as the Rams lost by a score of 55–40.[136] During a Week 5 30–29 road loss against the Seattle Seahawks on Thursday Night Football, Cooks had a 27-yard rush and a 29-yard reception before leaving the game with an injury.[137][138] Three weeks later against the Cincinnati Bengals in London, he suffered a concussion after taking a helmet-to-helmet hit from Jessie Bates III during the first quarter.[139] The Rams went on to win 24–10 and Cooks missed the next two games due to the concussion.[140] He returned in Week 12 against the Baltimore Ravens. In that game, he caught two passes for 32 receiving yards in the 45–6 loss on Monday Night Football.[141] During Week 16 against the San Francisco 49ers, Cooks caught his second touchdown of the season in the 34–31 road loss.[142] In the regular-season finale the following week, he caught three passes for 40 receiving yards as the Rams defeated the Arizona Cardinals by a score of 31–24.[143]

Cooks finished the 2019 season with 42 receptions for 583 receiving yards and two receiving touchdowns, all his lowest totals since his rookie season in 2014.[144]

Houston Texans[edit]

On April 10, 2020, Cooks and a 2022 fourth-round draft pick were traded to the Houston Texans in exchange for the Texans second-round draft pick in the 2020 NFL Draft.[145]

In Week 5 against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Cooks recorded eight catches for 161 yards and his first touchdown reception as a Texan during the 30–14 win.[146]

NFL statistics[edit]

Legend
Led the league
Bold Career high

Regular season[edit]

Year Team Games Receiving Rushing Returning Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD Ret Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2014 NO 10 7 53 550 10.4 50T 3 7 73 10.4 28 1 11 47 4.3 15 0 1 0
2015 NO 16 12 84 1,138 13.5 71T 9 8 18 2.3 11 0 2 12 6.0 6 0 1 0
2016 NO 16 12 78 1,173 15.0 98T 8 6 30 5.0 11 0 1 2 2.0 2 0 1 0
2017 NE 16 15 65 1,082 16.6 64T 7 9 40 4.4 13 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0
2018 LAR 16 16 80 1,204 15.1 57 5 10 68 6.8 17 1 0 0 0.0 0 0 1 0
2019 LAR 14 14 42 583 13.9 57 2 6 52 8.7 27 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0
2020 HOU 5 5 18 299 16.6 38 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0
Total 94 82 420 6,029 14.4 98T 35 46 281 6.1 28 2 14 61 4.4 15 0 4 0

Postseason[edit]

Year Team Games Receiving Rushing Returning Fumbles
GP GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Att Yds Avg Lng TD Ret Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2017 NE 3 3 10 155 15.5 31 0 1 1 1.0 1 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0
2018 LAR 3 3 19 292 15.4 36 0 1 5 5.0 5 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0
Total 6 6 29 447 15.4 36 0 2 6 3.0 5 0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0 0

NFL records[edit]

  • First player in NFL history with 1,000 receiving yards in three consecutive seasons with three different teams[147]

Rams franchise records[edit]

  • Most games in a single postseason with at least 100 receiving yards: (2, in 2018) (tied with Isaac Bruce, Kevin Curtis, and Tom Fears)[148]
  • Most targets in a Super Bowl: (13, in Super Bowl LIII)[149]
  • Most receptions in a Super Bowl: (8, in Super Bowl LIII)[150]

Saints franchise records[edit]

  • Longest touchdown reception (98 yards)[151]

Personal life[edit]

Cooks is a Christian.[152] He followed big plays in the 2016 season with a bow-and-arrow motion, referencing a Bible verse in which a boy named Ishmael used his archery skills to survive in the desert after he nearly died there without water.[153]

Cooks married Briannon Lepman on July 7, 2018.[154][155]

In 2020, Cooks donated $50,000 to his hometown of Stockton, California. The donation helped establish the Stockton's Children's Fund, which serves local children impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.[156]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]