Brandon Beachy

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Brandon Beachy
Beachy6.jpg
Brandon Beachy
Los Angeles Dodgers – No. 37
Pitcher
Born: (1986-09-03) September 3, 1986 (age 28)
Kokomo, Indiana
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 20, 2010 for the Atlanta Braves
Career statistics
(through 2013 season)
Win–loss record 14–10
Earned run average 3.20
Strikeouts 271
Teams

Brandon Alan Beachy (born September 3, 1986), is a professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers. He previously has played for the Atlanta Braves.

Listed at 6' 3", 215 lb., Beachy bats right-handed and throws right-handed.

Amateur career[edit]

Beachy helped lead the Northwestern Senior High School baseball team to Indiana's 2004–2005 class AA state championship game. After the game, he was presented with the IHSAA Mental Attitude Award.[1] After high school, he attended Indiana Wesleyan University, where he played third base, first base, and pitched.[2][3]

Beachy was not selected in the 2008 major league draft following his junior year of college, but signed with the Atlanta Braves as an undrafted free agent on July 22, 2008.[4]

Minor leagues[edit]

Beachy signing autographs in 2012

Beachy compiled a 4–3 record with one save and a 3.87 ERA in 7623 innings of work spread over 35 appearances and three different teams in 2009. He struck out 64 batters and walked 19. Most of his time was spent with the Myrtle Beach Pelicans of the Class A advanced Carolina League.[5]

In spring 2010, Beachy was one of six pitchers who took part in a spring mini-camp in which some of the Braves’ top minor leaguers took turns serving as backups for major league players in spring training games. He was the youngest minor leaguer in the mini-camp.[5]

Beachy was moved into the starting rotation for the AA Mississippi Braves late June 2010. In his time as a AA player, he struck out 100 batters while allowing 53 hits and 22 walks in 27 games (73.2 innings) while maintaining a 1.47 ERA. He compiled a record of 3 wins and 1 loss. Opposing hitters hit .200 and produced 12 earned runs. Beachy's best performance of the season occurred on July 15 when he struck out 13 of 19 batters against the Huntsville Stars.[6]

Beachy was promoted to the AAA Gwinnett Braves in the fall of 2010. While there, he delivered 2 wins with 0 losses and a 2.17 ERA.[7]

Major Leagues[edit]

Atlanta Braves[edit]

Beachy made his Major League debut with the Braves as the starting pitcher against the Philadelphia Phillies on September 20, 2010, as a replacement for Jair Jurrjens who had injured his knee. Beachy pitched for 413 innings, gave up three runs (one earned), and received his first Major League loss. He had two losses in three starts for the Braves in 2010, with an ERA of 3.00.[8]

On March 24, 2011, the Braves announced that Beachy would be the club's fifth starter for the 2011 season. He was selected over Mike Minor for the final spot in Atlanta's rotation.[9] In his fourth start of the season, he recorded his first major-league win by throwing six scoreless innings against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Dodger Stadium on April 19. During his first game back from an oblique injury, he set a new career high with 11 strikeouts in a game against the Toronto Blue Jays on June 22, 2011.[10] He was 7–3 with a 3.68 ERA in 25 starts that season for the Braves.[8]

Beachy got off to a strong start in 2012, and on May 17, 2012, he threw his first career shutout in a game against the Miami Marlins.[11] He was placed on the disabled list on June 17 after suffering from elbow discomfort and on June 18, he was diagnosed with a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow. At the time, he led all starting pitchers in the Major Leagues with a 2.00 ERA.[12] Beachy underwent Tommy John surgery on June 21, ending his 2012 season.[13]

Beachy began the 2013 season on the 15-day disabled list, still recovering from the surgery and he returned to the Braves' starting rotation and made his season debut on July 29, 2013 in the place of Tim Hudson, who suffered a season-ending ankle fracture.[14] He was 2–1 with a 4.50 ERA in five starts at the end of the season.[8]

On December 16, 2013, Beachy agreed with the Braves on a one-year deal for the 2014 season.[15][16] However, on March 20, it was reported that he would need a second Tommy John surgery[17] and he did not pitch during the 2014 season.[18] Beachy became a free agent on December 2, 2014 after he was non-tendered by the Braves.[19]

Los Angeles Dodgers[edit]

On February 21, 2015, Beachy agreed to a 1-year deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers, with a club option for 2016.[20] He returned to the mound in a professional game for the first time since the surgery on June 16, 2015, when he threw 35 pitches for the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes in a California League game.[21]

Pitching style[edit]

Beachy throws four pitches: a relatively straight four-seam fastball in the 90–94 mph range, a slider (80–84), a changeup (78–82), and a curveball (71–75). Beachy throws mostly fastballs and sliders to right-handed hitters, but he uses his changeup more frequently against left-handed hitters. He is especially fond of using his slider in two-strike counts.[22]

Personal life[edit]

Beachy's parents are Lester and Lori Beachy; he is the eldest of seven siblings.[23]

He majored in pre-law and criminal justice and has worked at a center for delinquent children.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Huggler, Randy (March 26, 2013). "Beachy bouncing back". Kokomo Perspective. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  2. ^ Odum, Charles (June 4, 2012). "Braves' Beachy goes from undrafted to ERA leader". Associated Press. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  3. ^ Gaskins, Bryan (July 22, 2008). "Braves sign NW's Brandon Beachy". Kokomo Tribune. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Dodgers sign Brandon Beachy". MLB.com. February 21, 2015. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Gaskins, Bryan (March 14, 2010). "Beachy is taking part in Braves’ spring training". Kokomo Tribune. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  6. ^ Geiselman, Steven (August 5, 2010). "Kokomo’s Beachy making noise in the Braves farm system". Kokomo Perspective. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  7. ^ "Brandon Beachy MiLB Stats". MinorLeageBaseball.com. Retrieved 2010-09-09. 
  8. ^ a b c "Brandon Beachy statistics & history". Baseball Reference. 
  9. ^ Bowman, Mark. "Beachy Wins Fifth Starter Spot for Braves". Retrieved 24 March 2011. 
  10. ^ Rogers, Carroll (June 23, 2011). "Beachy strikes out 11 to complete sweep". Atlanta Journal Constitution. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  11. ^ ERA leader Beachy throws first shutout in rout of Fish
  12. ^ "Beachy has partially torn elbow ligament". MLB.com. June 18, 2012. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Beachy undergoes Tommy John surgery". MLB.com. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  14. ^ Bowman, Mark. "Beachy poised to take injured Hudson's slot". MLB.com. Retrieved 26 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Braves added Gavin Floyd, settle with Brandon Beachy". USA Today. Associated Press. December 16, 2013. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  16. ^ Bowman, Mark (December 16, 2013). "Braves, Beachy avoid arbitration with one-year deal". MLB.com. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  17. ^ Bowman, Mark (March 20, 2014). "Beachy to have Tommy John surgery on Friday". MLB.com. Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  18. ^ Saxon, Mark (February 21, 2015). "Dodgers sign RHP Brandon Beachy". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  19. ^ Bowman, Mark (December 2, 2014). "Braves decline tenders to Medlen, Beachy". MLB.com. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  20. ^ Gurnick, Ken (February 21, 2015). "Dodgers ink Beachy to a one-year deal". MLB.com. Retrieved February 21, 2015. 
  21. ^ Weisman, Jon (June 16, 2015). "After 22 months, Brandon Beachy returns to action in rehab start". Dodgers Insider. Retrieved June 17, 2015. 
  22. ^ "PITCHf/x Player Card: Brandon Beachy". BrooksBaseball.net. Retrieved 26 April 2012. 
  23. ^ a b Rogers, Carroll. "Braves' Beachy has felt the heat of a pressure situation before". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 

External links[edit]