Brazil at the 2006 FIFA World Cup

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At the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Brazil participated for the 18th time in the event. The country remained as the only national team to have participated in every installment of the FIFA World Cup.

The Brazilian team played until the quarter-finals, where they were defeated by France, finishing the tournament in the fifth place — for the third time in history (1954 and 1986 were the previous instances).

Qualifying[edit]

Brazil's qualifying for the event marked the first time in history in which a returning champion (the country had won the 2002 World Cup) had to play for a berth in the next World Cup — that had a direct effect in the organization of the 2006 World Cup: since the 1990 World Cup, the competition has had an opening match, which is played immediately after the Opening Ceremonies; until the last World Cup, this match was a privilege of the winner of the previous World Cup, who would play its first match as the first match of the given World Cup, against an opponent from its group, as decided by the official draw (in the 1990 World Cup, Argentina, winner of the 1986 FIFA World Cup, played Cameroon in the opening match; in 1994, Germany, winner of the 1990 World Cup, played Bolivia; in 1998, Brazil played Scotland and in 2002 France played Senegal). As of the 2006 World Cup, because of the change in the rules, with the last champion no longer having a secured berth in the competition, the opening match has become another privilege of the host nation (in the 2006 World Cup, Germany, as the host nation, played Costa Rica in the opening match). Despite being the returning champion, the Brazilian team debuted, against Croatia, only four days after the Opening Ceremonies and the opening match.

The national team qualified with more ease than in previous years — for the 1994 World Cup, Brazil only qualified in the very last match, against Uruguay, where a defeat would have meant missing the finals; For the 2002 FIFA World Cup, Brazil had four different managers, and was once in serious jeopardy of being left out of the event.

The Qualifying for the 2006 World Cup repeated the format installed for the previous Qualifying tournament, in 2000 and 2001 (for the 2002 World Cup): all ten South American countries played each other, in two-leg matches, with the top four teams qualifying automatically for the World Cup, whereas the fifth best team would play the champion of Oceania, which was Australia, for a berth in the World Cup.

Brazil finished first, winning the Qualifying tournament. The results were the following:

Results
Date Venue Opponent Score
September 7, 2003 Estadio Metropolitano,
Barranquilla
 Colombia 2:1
September 10, 2003 Vivaldão,
Manaus
Ecuador 1:0
November 16, 2003 Estadio Nacional,
Lima
Peru 1:1
November 19, 2003 Pinheirão,
Curitiba
Uruguay 3:3
March 31, 2004 Defensores del Chaco,
Asunción
Paraguay 0:0
June 2, 2004 Mineirão,
Belo Horizonte
Argentina 3:1
June 6, 2004 Estadio Nacional,
Santiago
Chile 1:1
September 5, 2004 Morumbi,
São Paulo
Bolivia 3:1
October 9, 2004 Estadio José Pachencho Romero,
Maracaibo
Venezuela 5:2
October 13, 2004 Estádio Rei Pelé,
Maceió
Colombia 0:0
November 17, 2004 Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa,
Maracaibo
Ecuador 0:1
March 27, 2005 Serra Dourada,
Goiânia
Peru 1:0
March 30, 2005 Centenario,
Montevideo
Uruguay 1:1
June 4, 2005 Beira-Rio,
Porto Alegre
Paraguay 4:1
June 7, 2005 Monumental de Nuñez,
Buenos Aires
Argentina 1:3
September 3, 2005 Estádio Mané Garrincha,
Brasília
Chile 5:0
October 8, 2005 Estadio Hernando Siles,
La Paz
Bolivia 1:1
October 11, 2005 Mangueirão,
Belém
Venezuela 3:0

The final standings were the following:

Final Standings
Country Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
Brazil 34 18 9 7 2 35 17 18
Argentina 34 18 10 4 4 29 17 12
Ecuador 28 18 8 4 6 23 19 4
Paraguay 28 18 8 4 6 23 23 0
Uruguay 25 18 6 7 5 23 28 -5
Colombia 24 18 6 6 6 24 16 8
Chile 22 18 5 7 6 18 22 -4
Venezuela 18 18 5 3 10 20 28 -8
Peru 18 18 4 6 8 20 28 -8
Bolivia 14 18 4 2 12 20 37 -17

World Cup preparation[edit]

The Brazilian squad preparing for the World Cup in Weggis, Switzerland

A month before the start of the competition, the Brazilian national team took quarters in the small Swiss town of Weggis, at the Weggis Park Hotel. The objective was to get the team accustomed to Germany's climate while maintaining the focus on the competition. The preparation started on May 22 and ended on June 4.

During this time, the Brazilian team played two friendly matches. The first was on May 28, against the under-20 team of the Brazilian club Fluminense, which was in Europe to play a tournament and took a detour to Switzerland to meet and play the national team; this match ended 13–1 in favour of the national team.[1] The second match was played against the state team of the Swiss Lucerne. The match took place in Basel, at the St. Jakob Stadion and was won by the Brazilian team with a score of 8 goals to nul.[2]

For this period in Switzerland, the Brazilian Football Confederation sold the rights to explore the presence of the national team to a Swiss events enterprise. In exchange for the declared amount of US$1.2 million, the Swiss company was allowed to sell tickets for the practice sessions — which were sold at €40 each, for about 5,000 people per session —, negotiate permissions for vending points to operate within the training facility and surrounding area — which were sold for about €2,000 plus 10% of the profit — and to organize and explore the friendly matches that the national team was to play during its preparation in Switzerland.

On May 31, only 13 days away from the team's debut in the World Cup, defender Edmílson was cut from the squad due to a knee injury he had sustained during the practice session the day prior. São Paulo's Mineiro was called to take his place.

Upon leaving Weggis, on June 4 the national team made a stop in Geneva on June 5 to play its last friendly match before arriving in Germany. There, the team played New Zealand at the Stade de Genève – refereed by Jerome Laperriere – defeating New Zealand 4–0.[3]

Finally, the team travelled to the German town of Königstein im Taunus, which invested the declared amount of €500,000 in order to prepare for receiving the Brazilian team.

Draw[edit]

Traditionally, the host nation (in this case, Germany) is the first seed, being placed in Group A. On December 6, 2005, so as to prevent a possible match between Brazil and Germany before the final, FIFA placed the previous competition champion as the sixth seed, in Group F. The opponents of the Brazilian team in the first stage were, respectively, Croatia, Australia and Japan.

History[edit]

Round Robin

The Brazilian team had never faced any of its first round opponents before in World Cups. But other matches, both official and friendly ones, have taken place. The history of those matches until, but not including, the 2006 World Cup is as follows:

Opponent Matches Victories Ties Defeats Goals scored Goals conceded First
match
Last
match
Croatia 1 0 1 0 1 1 1:1 (on August 17, 2005 at Poljud, Split) 1:1 (on August 17, 2005 at Poljud, Split)
Australia 5 3 1 1 9 1 1:0 (on July 7, 1988, at Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne) 0:1 (on June 9, 2001 at Munsu Cup Stadium, Ulsan, South Korea)
Japan 7 5 2 0 16 3 1:0 (on July 23, 1989, at Estádio São Januário, Rio de Janeiro) 2:2 (on June 22, 2005 at RheinEnergieStadion, Cologne, Germany)

source

Round of 16

Prior to their meeting in the Round of 16 of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Brazil and Ghana had played only one friendly match. Although this was officially a match between the two main teams, Brazil played it using its under-23 team (the so-called "Olympic squad"), as the match was a part of the preparation for the football competition of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Opponent Matches Victories Ties Defeats Goals scored Goals conceded First
match
Last
match
Ghana 1 1 0 0 8 2 8:2 (on March 27, 1996, at Estádio Benedito Teixeira, São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil) 8:2 (on March 27, 1996, at Estádio Benedito Teixeira, São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil)

source

Quarterfinal

Both the first and the last matches between Brazil and France prior to their 2006 World Cup quarterfinal encounter were friendly matches. The last one was a commemorative display for FIFA's centennial anniversary.

Opponent Matches Victories Ties Defeats Goals scored Goals conceded First
match
Last
match
France 12 5 4 3 21 17 3:2 (on August 1, 1930, at Estádio das Laranjeiras, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) 0:0 (on May 20, 2004 at Stade de France, Saint-Denis, France)

Sources:[4] /[5]

World Cup squad[edit]

Number / Name Club Birthdate Pld Goals YC RC
Goalkeepers
1  Dida  Milan 10.07.1973 5 0 0 0
12  Rogério Ceni  São Paulo 22.01.1973 1 0 0 0
22  Júlio César  Internazionale 03.09.1979 0 0 0 0
Defenders
2  Cafu (captain)  Milan 07.06.1970 4 0 2 0
3  Lúcio  Bayern Munich 08.05.1978 5 0 1 0
4  Juan  Bayer Leverkusen 01.02.1979 5 0 2 0
6  Roberto Carlos  Real Madrid 10.04.1973 4 0 0 0
13  Cicinho  Real Madrid 24.06.1980 2 0 0 0
14  Luisão  Benfica 10.04.1973 0 0 0 0
15  Cris  Lyon 03.06.1977 0 0 0 0
16  Gilberto  Hertha BSC 25.04.1976 1 1 1 0
Midfielders
5  Emerson  Juventus 04.04.1976 3 0 1 0
8  Kaká  Milan 22.04.1982 5 1 0 0
10  Ronaldinho  Barcelona 21.03.1980 5 0 0 0
11  Zé Roberto  Bayern Munich 06.07.1974 5 1 0 0
17  Gilberto Silva  Arsenal 07.10.1976 4 0 0 0
18  Mineiro 1  São Paulo 02.08.1975 0 0 0 0
19  Juninho  Lyon 30.01.1975 3 1 0 0
20  Ricardinho  Corinthians 31.05.1976 2 0 0 0
Forwards
7  Adriano  Internazionale 17.02.1982 4 2 1 0
9  Ronaldo  Real Madrid 22.09.1976 5 3 2 0
21  Fred  Lyon 31.10.1981 1 1 0 0
23  Robinho  Real Madrid 25.01.1984 4 0 1 0
Coach
  Carlos Alberto Parreira   27.02.1943

Pld = matches played, YC = yellow cards, RC = red cards.

1 Mineiro replaced Edmílson, who was cut due to a knee injury.

Matches[edit]

All times local (UTC+2)

Round robin[edit]

Group F

Team Pts Pld W D L GF GA GD
1.  Brazil 9 3 3 0 0 7 1 +6
2.  Australia 4 3 1 1 1 5 5 0
3.  Croatia 2 3 0 2 1 2 3 -1
4.  Japan 1 3 0 1 2 2 7 -5

First Round

Brazil vs Croatia

Tuesday, June 13, 2006
21:00 - Olympiastadion, Berlin - Attendance: 72,000

 Brazil 1 – 0 (1 – 0) Croatia 
Kaká 44'
Start line-up of the match
BRAZIL:
GK 1 Dida
DF 2 Cafu (C)
DF 3 Lúcio
DF 4 Juan
DF 6 Roberto Carlos
MD 5 Emerson YC 42'
MD 8 Kaká
MD 11 Zé Roberto
FW 7 Adriano
FW 9 Ronaldo (- 70')
FW 10 Ronaldinho
Substitutions:
FW 23 Robinho (+ 70')
Coach:
Carlos Alberto Parreira
  • Referee: Benito Archundia (Mexico)
  • Assistant referees:
  • Fourth official: Mohamed Guezzaz (Morocco)
  • Fifth official: Brahim Djezzar (Algeria)
  • Man of the match: Brazil Kaká

Second Round

Brazil vs. Australia

Sunday, June 18, 2006
18:00 - FIFA World Cup Stadium Munich, Munich - Attendance: 66,000

 Brazil 2 – 0 (0 – 0) Australia 
Adriano 49'
Fred 90'
Start line-up of the match
BRAZIL:
GK 1 Dida
DF 2 Cafu (C) YC 29'
DF 3 Lúcio
DF 4 Juan
DF 6 Roberto Carlos
MD 5 Emerson (-72')
MD 8 Kaká
MD 11 Zé Roberto
FW 7 Adriano (-88')
FW 9 Ronaldo (-72') YC 31'
FW 10 Ronaldinho
Substitutions:
MD 12 Gilberto Silva (+ 72')
FW 13 Robinho (+ 72') YC 83'
FW 14 Fred (+ 88')
Coach:
Carlos Alberto Parreira
  • Referee: Markus Merk (Germany)
  • Assistant referees:
    • Christian Schraer (Germany)
    • Jan-Hendrik Salver (Germany)
  • Fourth official: Marco Rodríguez (Mexico)
  • Fifth official: Leonel Leal (Costa Rica)
  • Man of the match: Brazil Zé Roberto

Third Round

Brazil vs Japan

Thursday, June 22, 2006
21:00 - FIFA World Cup Stadium Dortmund, Dortmund - Attendance: 65,000

 Japan 1 – 4 (1–1) Brazil 
Tamada 34' Ronaldo 46'+, 81'
Juninho 53'
Gilberto 59'
Start line-up of the match
BRAZIL:
GK 1 Dida (C) (- 82')
DF 3 Lúcio
DF 4 Juan
DF 16 Gilberto YC 44'
DF 13 Cicinho
MD 8 Kaká (- 71')
MD 17 Gilberto Silva
MD 19 Juninho
FW 23 Robinho
FW 9 Ronaldo (C +82')
FW 10 Ronaldinho (- 71')
Substitutions:
MD 11 Zé Roberto (+ 71')
MD 20 Ricardinho (+ 71')
GK 12 Rogério Ceni (+ 82')
Coach:
Carlos Alberto Parreira
  • Referee: Éric Poulat (France)
  • Assistant referees:
    • Lionel Dagorne (France)
    • Vincent Texier (France)
  • Fourth official: Jerome Damon (South Africa)
  • Fifth official: Enock Molefe (South Africa)
  • Man of the match: Brazil Ronaldo

Knockout stage[edit]

Round of 16 – Brazil vs Ghana

Tuesday, June 27, 2006
17:00 - FIFA WM-Stadion Dortmund, Dortmund - Attendance: 65,000

 Brazil 3 – 0 (2 – 0) Ghana 
Ronaldo 5'
Adriano 46+'
Zé Roberto 84'
Start line-up of the match
BRAZIL:
GK 1 Dida
DF 2 Cafu (C)
DF 3 Lúcio
DF 4 Juan YC 44'
DF 6 Roberto Carlos
MD 5 Emerson (- 46')
MD 8 Kaká (- 83')
MD 11 Zé Roberto
FW 7 Adriano YC 13' (- 61')
FW 9 Ronaldo
FW 10 Ronaldinho
Substitutions:
MD 17 Gilberto Silva (+ 46')
MD 19 Juninho (+ 61')
MD 20 Ricardinho (+ 83')
Coach:
Carlos Alberto Parreira
  • Referee: Ľuboš Micheľ (Slovakia)
  • Assistant referees
    • Roman Slysko (Slovakia)
    • Martin Balko (Slovakia)
  • Fourth official: Mark Shield (Australia)
  • Fifth official: Nathan Gibson (Australia)
  • Man of the match: Brazil Zé Roberto

Quarterfinal – Brazil vs France

Saturday, July 1, 2006
21:00 - FIFA WM-Stadion Frankfurt, Frankfurt - Attendance: 52,000

 Brazil 0 – 1 (0 – 0) France 
Henry 57'
Start line-up of the match
BRAZIL:
GK 1 Dida
DF 2 Cafu (C) YC 25' (-76')
DF 3 Lúcio YC 47'
DF 4 Juan YC 45'
DF 6 Roberto Carlos
MD 8 Kaká (-79')
MD 10 Ronaldinho
MD 11 Zé Roberto
MD 17 Gilberto Silva
MD 19 Juninho (-63')
FW 9 Ronaldo (C+76') YC 47+'
Substitutions:
FW 7 Adriano (+ 63')
DF 13 Cicinho (+ 76')
FW 23 Robinho (+ 79')
Coach:
Carlos Alberto Parreira
  • Referee: Luis Medina Cantalejo (Spain)
  • Assistant referees
    • Victoriano Giraldez Carrasco (Spain)
    • Pedro Medina Hernández (Spain)
  • Fourth official: Mark Shield (Australia)
  • Fifth official: Ben Wilson (Australia)
  • Man of the match: France Zinedine Zidane

Brazilians in other national teams[edit]

The Brazilian participation in the World Cup was not restricted to the national football team. Many individuals were involved with other national teams, some as players, some as members of their teams' technical staff. Those playing for other national teams had acquired the respective country's citizenship, and according to FIFA's ruling, can never play for the Brazilian team in the future. Those were:

  • In Saudi Arabia: Coach Marcos Paquetá and the entire technical staff, hired by Paquetá. Immediately before the last match in the first stage of the World Cup, when disqualification was imminent for Saudi Arabia, Saudi prince Nawaf bin Faisal, who is president of the Saudi Football Confederation, guaranteed that, regardless of the outcome, Paquetá was to remain as Saudi Arabia's head coach.[6]
  • In Tunisia: Maranhão-born Francileudo dos Santos was a striker for the Tunisian team. He was regarded as the team's "star".
  • In Portugal: Head coach Luiz Felipe Scolari and his assistant coach, Flávio Murtosa; as well as midfielder Deco.
  • In Japan: former player and Brazilian football legend Zico was Japan's head coach. Following the team's elimination, Zico left the Japanese team.[7] In addition, Japan also had the Maringá-born fullback Alex Santos.
  • In Spain: São Paulo-born midfielder Marcos Senna played for the Spanish team.
  • In Costa Rica: Alexandre Guimarães was the country's head coach for the World Cup, as he had been in Costa Rica's previous participation, in 2002. He also played for Costa Rica in 1990. After losing all three matches, Guimarães left the national team, allegedly in the wake of death threats received via anonymous phone calls.[8]

References[edit]