Brazil at the FIFA World Cup

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Brazil national team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia

This articles summarizes the results and overall performance of Brazil at the FIFA World Cup.

The tournament consists of two parts, the qualification phase and the final phase, officially called the World Cup Finals. The qualification phase, which currently takes place over the three years preceding the Finals, is used to determine which teams qualify for the Finals. The current format of the Finals involves 32 teams competing for the title, at venues within the host nation (or nations) over a period of about a month. The World Cup Finals is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, with an estimated over 1 billion people watching the 2014 tournament final.[1]

Brazil is the most successful national team in the history of the World Cup, having won five titles, earning second-place, third-place and fourth-place finishes twice each. Brazil is one of the countries besides Argentina, Spain and Germany to win a FIFA World Cup away from its continent (Sweden 1958, Mexico 1970, USA 1994 and South Korea/Japan 2002). Brazil is the only national team to have played in all FIFA World Cup editions without any absence or need for playoffs. Brazil also has the best overall performance in World Cup history in both proportional and absolute terms with a record of 73 victories in 109 matches played, 124 goal difference, 237 points and only 18 losses.[2][3]

Traditionally, Brazil's greatest rival is Argentina. The two countries have met each other four times in the history of the FIFA World Cup, with two wins for Brazil (West Germany 1974 and Spain 1982), one for Argentina (Italy 1990) and a draw (Argentina 1978). The country that played most against Brazil in the finals is Sweden: 7 times, with five wins for Brazil and two draws. Three other historical rivals are Italy, which lost two World Cup finals against Brazil and eliminated the Brazilians in two tournaments (France 1938 and Spain 1982), France, which has eliminated Brazil on three occasions (Mexico 1986, France 1998 and Germany 2006), and the Netherlands, which has eliminated Brazil at two of their five meetings (West Germany 1974 and South Africa 2010) and won the third place match in Brazil 2014.

Records[edit]

Year Status Position GP W D* L GS GA
Uruguay 1930 Group stage 6th 2 1 0 1 5 2
Italy 1934 First round 14th 1 0 0 1 1 3
France 1938 Third place 3rd 5 3 1 1 14 11
Brazil 1950 Runners-up 2nd 6 4 1 1 22 6
Switzerland 1954 Quarter-finals 5th 3 1 1 1 8 5
Sweden 1958 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 16 4
Chile 1962 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 14 5
England 1966 Group stage 11th 3 1 0 2 4 6
Mexico 1970 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 19 7
West Germany 1974 Fourth place 4th 7 3 2 2 6 4
Argentina 1978 Third place 3rd 7 4 3 0 10 3
Spain 1982 Second group stage 5th 5 4 0 1 15 6
Mexico 1986 Quarter-finals 5th 5 4 1 0 10 1
Italy 1990 Round of 16 9th 4 3 0 1 4 2
United States 1994 Champions 1st 7 5 2 0 11 3
France 1998 Runners-up 2nd 7 4 1 2 14 10
South Korea Japan 2002 Champions 1st 7 7 0 0 18 4
Germany 2006 Quarter-finals 5th 5 4 0 1 10 2
South Africa 2010 Quarter-finals 6th 5 3 1 1 9 4
Brazil 2014 Fourth place 4th 7 3 2 2 11 14
Russia 2018 Quarter-finals 6th 5 3 1 1 8 3
Qatar 2022 TBD
Canada Mexico United States 2026
Total 21/21 5 Titles 109 73 18 18 229 105

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Winning World Cups[edit]

Year Manager Captain Goalscorer(s) in Final
1958 Vicente Feola Hilderaldo Bellini Vavá, Pelé, Mário Zagallo
1962 Aymoré Moreira Mauro Ramos Amarildo, Zito, Vavá
1970 Mário Zagallo Carlos Alberto Pelé, Gérson, Jairzinho, Carlos Alberto
1994 Carlos Alberto Parreira Dunga N/A
2002 Luiz Felipe Scolari Cafu Ronaldo

By match[edit]

Year Round Against Score Scorers
1930 Group B  Yugoslavia 1–2 Preguinho
Group B  Bolivia 4–0 Moderato (2), Preguinho (2)
1934 Round 1  Spain 1–3 Leônidas
1938 Round 1  Poland 6–5 (AET) Leônidas (3), Romeu, Perácio (2)
Quarter-finals  Czechoslovakia 1–1 (AET) Leônidas
Quarter-finals (replay)  Czechoslovakia 2–1 Leônidas, Roberto
Semi-finals  Italy 1–2 Romeu
Third place playoff  Sweden 4–2 Romeu, Leônidas (2), Perácio
1950 Group A  Mexico 4–0 Ademir (2), Jair, Baltazar
Group A   Switzerland 2–2 Alfredo, Baltazar
Group A  Yugoslavia 2–0 Ademir, Zizinho
Final Round  Sweden 7–1 Ademir (4), Chico (2), Maneca
Final Round  Spain 6–1 Ademir (2), Jair, Chico (2), Zizinho
Final Round  Uruguay 1–2 Friaça
1954 Group A  Mexico 5–0 Baltazar, Didi, Pinga (2), Julinho
Group A  Yugoslavia 1–1 (AET) Didi
Quarter-finals  Hungary 2–4 Djalma Santos, Julinho
1958 Group D  Austria 3–0 Mazzola (2), Nilton Santos
Group D  England 0–0
Group D  Soviet Union 2–0 Vavá (2)
Quarter-finals  Wales 1–0 Pelé
Semi-finals  France 5–2 Vavá, Didi, Pelé (3)
Final  Sweden 5–2 Vavá (2), Pelé (2), Zagallo
1962 Group C  Mexico 2–0 Pelé, Zagallo
Group C  Czechoslovakia 0–0
Group C  Spain 2–1 Amarildo (2)
Quarter-finals  England 3–1 Garrincha (2), Vavá
Semi-finals  Chile 4–2 Garrincha (2), Vavá (2)
Final  Czechoslovakia 3–1 Amarildo, Zito, Vavá
1966 Group C  Bulgaria 2–0 Pelé, Garrincha
Group C  Hungary 1–3 Tostão
Group C  Portugal 1–3 Rildo
1970 Group C  Czechoslovakia 4–1 Rivelino, Pelé, Jairzinho (2)
Group C  England 1–0 Jairzinho
Group C  Romania 3–2 Pelé (2), Jairzinho
Quarter-finals  Peru 4–2 Rivelino, Tostão (2), Jairzinho
Semi-finals  Uruguay 3–1 Clodoaldo, Jairzinho, Rivelino
Final  Italy 4–1 Pelé, Gérson, Jairzinho, Carlos Alberto
1974 Group B  Yugoslavia 0–0
Group B  Scotland 0–0
Group B  Zaire 3–0 Jairzinho, Rivelino, Valdomiro
Group A Round 2  East Germany 1–0 Rivelino
Group A Round 2  Argentina 2–1 Rivelino, Jairzinho
Group A Round 2  Netherlands 0–2
Third place playoff  Poland 0–1
1978 Group C  Sweden 1–1 Reinaldo
Group C  Spain 0–0
Group C  Austria 1–0 Roberto Dinamite
Group B Round 2  Peru 3–0 Dirceu (2), Zico
Group B Round 2  Argentina 0–0
Group B Round 2  Poland 3–1 Nelinho, Roberto Dinamite (2)
Third place playoff  Italy 2–1 Nelinho, Dirceu
1982 Group F  Soviet Union 2–1 Sócrates, Éder
Group F  Scotland 4–1 Zico, Oscar, Éder, Falcão
Group F  New Zealand 4–0 Zico (2), Falcão, Serginho
Group C Round 2  Argentina 3–1 Zico, Serginho, Júnior
Group C Round 2  Italy 2–3 Sócrates, Falcão
1986 Group D  Spain 1–0 Sócrates
Group D  Algeria 1–0 Careca
Group D  Northern Ireland 3–0 Careca (2), Josimar
Round of 16  Poland 4–0 Sócrates, Josimar, Edinho, Careca
Quarter-finals  France 1–1 (AET) Careca
1990 Group C  Sweden 2–1 Careca (2)
Group C  Costa Rica 1–0 Müller
Group C  Scotland 1–0 Müller
Round of 16  Argentina 0–1
1994 Group B  Russia 2–0 Romário, Raí
Group B  Cameroon 3–0 Romário, Márcio Santos, Bebeto
Group B  Sweden 1–1 Romário
Round of 16  United States 1–0 Bebeto
Quarter-finals  Netherlands 3–2 Romário, Bebeto, Branco
Semi-finals  Sweden 1–0 Romário
Final  Italy 0–0 (AET)
1998 Group A  Scotland 2–1 César Sampaio, Boyd (OG)
Group A  Morocco 3–0 Ronaldo, Rivaldo, Bebeto
Group A  Norway 1–2 Bebeto
Round of 16  Chile 4–1 Ronaldo (2), César Sampaio (2)
Quarter-finals  Denmark 3–2 Bebeto, Rivaldo (2)
Semi-finals  Netherlands 1–1 (AET) Ronaldo
Final  France 0–3
2002 Group C  Turkey 2–1 Ronaldo, Rivaldo
Group C  China PR 4–0 Roberto Carlos, Rivaldo, Ronaldinho, Ronaldo
Group C  Costa Rica 5–2 Ronaldo (2), Edmílson, Rivaldo, Júnior
Round of 16  Belgium 2–0 Rivaldo, Ronaldo
Quarter-finals  England 2–1 Rivaldo, Ronaldinho
Semi-finals  Turkey 1–0 Ronaldo
Final  Germany 2–0 Ronaldo (2)
2006 Group F  Croatia 1–0 Kaká
Group F  Australia 2–0 Adriano, Fred
Group F  Japan 4–1 Ronaldo (2), Juninho, Gilberto
Round of 16  Ghana 3–0 Adriano, Ronaldo, Zé Roberto
Quarter-finals  France 0–1
2010 Group G  North Korea 2–1 Maicon, Elano
Group G  Ivory Coast 3–1 Luís Fabiano (2), Elano
Group G  Portugal 0–0
Round of 16  Chile 3–0 Juan, Luís Fabiano, Robinho
Quarter-finals  Netherlands 1–2 Robinho
2014 Group A  Croatia 3–1 Neymar (2), Oscar
Group A  Mexico 0–0
Group A  Cameroon 4–1 Neymar (2), Fred, Fernandinho
Round of 16  Chile 1–1 (AET) David Luiz
Quarter-finals  Colombia 2–1 Thiago Silva, David Luiz
Semi-finals  Germany 1–7 Oscar
Third place playoff  Netherlands 0–3
2018 Group E   Switzerland 1–1 Coutinho
Group E  Costa Rica 2–0 Coutinho, Neymar
Group E  Serbia 2–0 Paulinho, Thiago Silva
Round of 16  Mexico 2–0 Neymar, Firmino
Quarter-finals  Belgium 1–2 Renato Augusto

By opponent[edit]

Country Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD Win%
 Sweden 7 5 2 0 21 8 +13 71
 Mexico 5 4 1 0 13 0 +13 80
 Czechoslovakia 5 3 2 0 10 4 +6 60
 Spain 5 3 1 1 10 5 +5 60
 Serbia 5 2 2 1 6 3 +3 40
 Italy 5 2 1 2 9 7 +2 40
 Netherlands 5 1 1 3 5 10 –5 20
 Chile 4 3 1 0 12 4 +8 75
 Scotland 4 3 1 0 7 2 +5 75
 England 4 3 1 0 6 2 +4 75
 Poland 4 3 0 1 13 7 +6 75
 Argentina 4 2 1 1 5 3 +2 50
 France 4 1 1 2 6 7 –1 25
 Costa Rica 3 3 0 0 8 2 +6 100
 Russia 3 3 0 0 6 1 +5 100
 Cameroon 2 2 0 0 7 1 +6 100
 Peru 2 2 0 0 7 2 +5 100
 Austria 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100
 Croatia 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3 100
 Turkey 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2 100
 Uruguay 2 1 0 1 4 3 +1 50
  Switzerland 2 0 2 0 3 3 0 0
 Portugal 2 0 1 1 1 3 –2 0
 Hungary 2 0 0 2 3 7 –4 0
 Germany 2 1 0 1 3 7 –4 50
 Belgium 2 1 0 1 3 2 +1 50
 Bolivia 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100
 Japan 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 100
 Ghana 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100
 Morocco 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100
 Northern Ireland 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100
 Zaire 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100
 Ivory Coast 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100
 Australia 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100
 Denmark 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 100
 Romania 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 100
 Bulgaria 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100
 North Korea 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100
 Colombia 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100
 Algeria 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100
 East Germany 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100
 United States 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100
 Wales 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100
 New Zealand 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100
 China PR 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100
 Norway 1 0 0 1 1 2 –1 0

Record Players[edit]

Brazil's record World Cup player, Cafu is also the only player ever to have appeared in three consecutive World Cup finals: 1994, '98 and 2002.

Cafu won the World Cup twice, in 1994 and in 2002, and is Brazil's record World Cup player.
No. Name Matches World Cups
1 Cafu 20 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2006
2 Ronaldo 19 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2006
3 Cláudio Taffarel 18 1990, 1994 and 1998
Dunga 18 1990, 1994 and 1998
5 Roberto Carlos 17 1998, 2002 and 2006
Lúcio 17 2002, 2006 and 2010
7 Jairzinho 16 1966, 1970 and 1974
Gilberto Silva 16 2002, 2006 and 2010
9 Nílton Santos 15 1950, 1954, 1958 and 1962
Didi 15 1954, 1958 and 1962
Rivellino 15 1970, 1974 and 1978
Bebeto 15 1990, 1994 and 1998

Top Goalscorers[edit]

Five Brazilians have won the World Cup Golden Boot Award over the years: Leônidas with 7 goals in 1938, Ademir with 8 goals in 1950, Garrincha and Vavá with 4 goals each in 1962 and Ronaldo with 8 goals in 2002.

With 15 goals, Ronaldo is the second-most successful striker in World Cup history, behind Miroslav Klose (16).
No. Name Goals World Cups
1 Ronaldo 15 1998 (4), 2002 (8) and 2006 (3)
2 Pelé 12 1958 (6), 1962 (1), 1966 (1) and 1970 (4)
3-4 Vavá 9 1958 (5) and 1962 (4)
Jairzinho 9 1970 (7) and 1974 (2)
5-7 Leônidas 8 1934 (1) and 1938 (7)
Ademir 8 1950
Rivaldo 8 1998 (3) and 2002 (5)
8 Careca 7 1986 (5) and 1990 (2)
9-11 Bebeto 6 1994 (3) and 1998 (3)
Rivellino 6 1970 (3) and 1974 (3)
Neymar 6 2014 (4) and 2018 (2)

Awards and Records[edit]

Team Awards[edit]

  • World Champions 1958
  • World Champions 1962
  • World Champions 1970
  • World Champions 1994
  • World Champions 2002
  • Second Place 1950
  • Second Place 1998
  • Third Place 1938
  • Third Place 1978
  • FIFA Fair Play Trophy 1982
  • FIFA Fair Play Trophy 1986
  • FIFA Fair Play Trophy 1994
  • FIFA Fair Play Trophy 2006
  • Most Entertaining Team 1994

Individual Awards[edit]

Golden Ball awards[edit]

Golden Boot awards[edit]

Other Individual Awards[edit]

Awards as coaches of other nations[edit]

Brazilian coaches have appeared on the sidelines of other nations with some regularity. Three of them have won team awards with their nations:

Team Records[edit]

  • Most titles (5)
  • Most participations (21)
  • Most victories (73)
  • Most sendings-off (11)
  • One of two teams to have defended their title as champions (1962). The other being Italy 1938.
  • Most wins in one tournament (7, 2002)

Individual Records[edit]

  • Pelé holds a number of FIFA World Cup records:
    • Only player to win three FIFA World Cups (1958, 1962 and 1970)
    • Youngest tournament winner (1958, at 17y 249d)
    • Youngest goalscorer (1958 v Wales, at 17y 239d)
    • Youngest hat-trick scorer (1958 v France, at 17y 244d)
    • Youngest goalscorer in a final (1958 v Sweden, at 17y 249d)
  • Youngest Golden Ball winner: Ronaldo (1998, at 21y 9m 24d)
  • Most appearances in an All-Star Team: Djalma Santos (3, 1954-1962) (shared with Franz Beckenbauer and Philipp Lahm)
  • Most appearances as a substitute: Denílson (11, 1998-2002)
  • Most tournament wins as player and coach: Mário Zagallo (3, 1958 & 1962 as player, 1970 as coach)
  • Only player to appear in three consecutive FIFA World Cup finals: Cafu (1994, 1998 and 2002)
  • Most team awards won: Cafu (6, 1994-2006)
  • Most cautions: Cafu (6)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2014 FIFA World Cup™ reached 3.2 billion viewers, one billion watched final" (Press release). FIFA. Retrieved 17 November 2017. 
  2. ^ "FIFA World Cup™ Teams Statistics". FIFA. Retrieved 17 November 2017. 
  3. ^ "World Cup All Time League Table". WorldFootball.net. 

External links[edit]