Brazil national rugby union team

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Brazil
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Tupis
Emblem Tupí chief
Union Confederação Brasileira de Rugby
Head coach Rodolfo Ambrosio
Captain Nick Smith
Top scorer Daniel Gregg (143)
Top try scorer Daniel Gregg (14)
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current 30 (as of 5 March 2017)
Highest 27 (2009, 2011)
Lowest 42 (2015)
First international
Uruguay 8 − 6 Brazil
(9 September 1950)
Biggest win
Costa Rica 0 − 95 Brazil
(10 October 2006)
Biggest defeat
Argentina 114 − 3 Brazil
(10 October 1992)
Argentina 111 − 0 Brazil
(5 May 2012)
World Cup
Appearances 0
Website www.brasilrugby.com.br

The Brazil national rugby union team, nicknamed Tupis,[1] is the national side of Brazil, representing them in international rugby union. Rugby union in Brazil is controlled by the Confederação Brasileira de Rugby. Brazil is one of the founding unions of CONSUR (now Sudamérica Rugby) and played in the inaugural 1951 edition. Brazil has not qualified for a Rugby World Cup, but will participate in the inaugural edition of rugby 7s in the Olympics.

Rugby union in Brazil has a long history, dating back to the late 19th century when British immigrants brought the game to Brazil's urban ports. Despite Brazil's success in association football, Brazil has historically been one of the weaker teams of the Americas, having less success than that of Argentina, Uruguay or Chile. Brazil have usually ranked 4th in South America, and rugby has lived in the shadows of other sports in Brazil.

In the 21st century, efforts were made to revitalize the sport in Brazil. With sevens being added to the Olympic calendar, Brazil were invited to the World Rugby Sevens Series, where they've improved in both men's and women's sides. In 2014, they recorded their first victory ever against Chile, winning 24-16. In 2016, a meeting with the unions of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, the United States and Uruguay established the Americas Rugby Championship, meant to mirror the Six Nations and The Rugby Championship, and give consistent tests to the top Americas unions. After 3 close games, two of which Brazil came very close to victory, Brazil beat the United States, 24-23, their first victory in the championship, as well as over the United States, and a Tier Two nation.

History[edit]

Beginnings (19th Century - 1949)[edit]

The very first instance of rugby being played in Brazil dates back to the late 19th century. British immigrants arriving in Brazil brought the game to various port cities in Brazil. These immigrants set up various athletic clubs which doubled with association football.[2] The first recorded instance of a rugby game being played in Brazil was 1891, played by the São Paulo Athletic Club, under the auspices of Charles William Miller. Future efforts to promote the game were then taken on by Augusto Shaw, after Miller began to devote himself exclusively to football.[3]

During the 1920s and 1930s, rugby began to flourish somewhat in Brazil, although it did not enjoy the widespread exposure as football. For the most part, rugby was primarily restricted to those who had British descent, or with some other connection to Britain. In 1926, proper domestic competition was established.[4] By 1932, a national side had formed; Brazil played its first ever national game against a South Africa XV, losing by an unknown margin. The sport suffered a setback when an attempt to get it recognized as a national sport was denied, since rugby was limited to only four states than the required five.[3] World War II suspended operations from 1941 to 1946, as was the case in many countries.

1950s - 1990s[edit]

Brazil participated in the first ever South American Rugby Championship, but lost all three of their fixtures. They were shut out 68 and 72 to zero against Chile and Argentina respectively, while Brazil played a more closer game against Uruguay, losing 10 – 17. During the 1950s, organization of rugby in Brazil was sporadic; there was no official high governing union at the time, and the national side was only organized by Jimmy Macintyre, who ran the SPAC. Brazil would not play another test until 1961. The modern day Brazilian Rugby Confederation (CBRu) was founded in 1963, in order to govern the game more efficiently in the country. The first president of the CBRu was Harry Donovan.[5] In 1964, Brazil finished runner-up in the South American Rugby Championship, tying Chile 16–16 and defeating Uruguay 15–8.

In the 1970s the better structure of rugby allowed the game to be introduced to Brazilians outside of the British-descended community. Brazil experienced somewhat of an expansion in rugby; the game was introduced to universities throughout the country, and Brazil was becoming a destination for rugby tours. In 1974, Brazil played a test match against France, losing by a margin of 7–99.[5] For the rest of the decade Brazil played against its South American neighbors; Brazil frequently beat minnows Paraguay during this period.

In 1985, France toured Brazil again, but this time Brazil played much more valiantly, losing by a score of 6–41. Brazil is a charter member of CONSUR (now Sudámerica Rugby), founded in 1989. Despite this, Brazil did not officially join the IRB until 1995, and did not participate in qualifying tournaments until then. However, their first fixture in the qualifiers was a disaster; Brazil were humiliated by Trinidad and Tobago by a score of 41–0, swiftly ending their campaign.

2000s - The New Century[edit]

Brazil began the 2000s with much more success. In 2000, Brazil easily won the 2000 edition of the SARC; they repeated this in 2001, topping the group of Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. Brazil advanced to the next round of qualifying, disposing of Trinidad and Tobago; Brazil would go on to lose their final games, but Brazil was finally starting to close the gap. Throughout the 2000s, Brazil began winning more of its games, and in 2008, finally broke through; Brazil beat Paraguay to finally advance to the top flight of the SARC, their first time there since 1989. Brazil further repeated this by beating Paraguay again in 2009.

In 2012, the New York Times reported that rugby was Brazil's second fastest growing sport, behind MMA. This is partly due to World Rugby re-investing in Brazil due to the reinstatement of rugby in the 2016 Olympics.[6] Since then, Brazil has been invited to the World Rugby Sevens Series, allowing Brazil to improve against higher competition.

In 2014, Brazil recorded its first ever victory over Chile, defeating the Condors 24 to 16. Since initiatives were taken in 2009; the character of rugby has changed in Brazil; the registration numbers have risen, and the sport has successfully formed sponsorships with companies such as Bradesco, many of whom see Brazilian rugby profitable in the future.[7]

In 2015, Brazil played two tetss against the national team of Germany, one held in Pacaembu Stadium; these exhibitions attracted 10,000 spectators, being one of the highest attendances for rugby in Brazil. Brazil's improved form showed in 2016 in the first edition of the Americas Rugby Championship, where Brazil were on the verge of historic victories against Chile and Uruguay, but could not hold on. After scoring 25 points in their first ever fixture versus Canada, Brazil went on to upset the United States 24–23 in Pacaembu; Brazil proceeded to finish off the tournament losing 7–41 to Argentina, scoring their first try against Argentina in decades.

For the 2016 South American Rugby Championship "A", RedeTV!, one of Brazil's major TV networks, will air Brazil's games live. Brazil played Uruguay at Allianz Parque in São Paulo, one of the largest stadiums to ever host a rugby game in Brazil. Brazil tied 20–20 against Chile, further signaling their rise to the top in South America. To cap off the tournament, Brazil beat Paraguay 32–21, finishing in third place only behind Chile on points difference.

Brazil improved in the 2017 edition of the ARC, beating Chile convincingly 17 to 3, before notching their first win in only their second meeting against Canada in Pacaembu, by the score of 24 to 23. After these victories, Brazil rose to 30th, their first time in the top 30 of the World Rugby Rankings since 2009.

Uniforms[edit]

Traditionally, the rugby team of Brazil has worn a strip of a yellow top and green shorts while the away strip consists of a green top and white shorts. The current provider of the kit is domestic based Topper. In 2015, the shorts were changed to blue, to be consistent of that of Brazil's football team; this included a presentation involving the Tupí tribe, whom the team is nicknamed after.[8] The current shirt sponsor of Brazil is Bradesco.

Nickname[edit]

For some time, Brazilian national rugby union side was unofficially associated with Walt Disney's character Zé Carioca. Some time later, CBRu, still known as Associação Brasileira de Rugby, or simply ABR, chose Vitória Régia as its official emblem and nickname. However, this nickname was not adopted by fans.

In March 2012, CBRu announced Os Tupis as Brazil national rugby union team's official nickname,[1] a reference to Tupi people, the main ethnic group of Brazilian indigenous people. The choice for an emblem started in 2010, when CBRu started receiving e-mails with several suggestions. The three finalists were Tupis, Sucuris (Anacondas) and Araras (Macaws). Fans voted on an Internet poll and chose Tupis with 47% (4,387 votes) of preference. According to CBRu's President, Sami Arap, "The choice ratified the roots of Brazilian people. Tupi represents the essence of our country, referring to [our] strength, perseverance, loyalty and team spirit".

Tournament records[edit]

Rugby World Cup[edit]

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round Played Won Drew Lost Pts F Pts A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Not invited
United KingdomIrelandFrance 1991 Did not enter Did not enter
South Africa 1995
Wales 1999 Did not qualify 1 0 0 1 0 41
Australia 2003 6 4 0 2 140 84
France 2007 5 3 0 2 179 108
New Zealand 2011 8 6 0 2 230 190
England 2015 5 1 0 4 85 164
Japan 2019 TBD 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0/8 25 14 0 11 634 587

Americas Rugby Championship[edit]

The Americas Rugby Championship was held in five of the seven years from 2009 to 2015, but Brazil did not participate. Brazil along with Chile has participated in an expanded six-country Americas Rugby Championship in 2016. In the 2016 ARC, 42nd ranked Brazil defeated the 16th ranked United States 24–23, their first win against the United States.

Tourney Record Pts Diff Position Wins
2016 1–4 −68 5th United States (24–23)
2017 2–3 −116 4th Chile (17–3); Canada (24–23)

South American Championship[edit]

Tourney Host Record Pts Diff Position Wins Draws Losses
2009  Uruguay 1–2 −129 4th Paraguay (36–21) Uruguay (3–71), Chile (3–79)
2010  Chile 1–2 −34 4th Paraguay (23–18) Uruguay (10–26), Chile (8–31)
2011  Argentina 1–2 −3 4th Paraguay (51–14) Uruguay (18–39), Chile (6–25)
2012  Chile 0–3 −136 4th Uruguay (15–27), Chile (6–19), Argentina (0–111)
2013  Uruguay 0–3 −150 4th Chile (22–38), Uruguay (7–58), Argentina (0–83)
2014 (four countries) 1–2 −24 3rd Chile (24–16) Paraguay (24–31), Uruguay (9–34)
2015 (four countries) 0–3 −77 4th Uruguay (9–48), Chile (3–32), Paraguay (11–17)
2016 (four countries) 1–1–1 −11 3rd Paraguay (32–21) Chile (20–20) Uruguay (14–36)

Overall record[edit]

Updated until 3 March 2017

Top 30 rankings as of 20 March 2017[9]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  New Zealand 94.78
2 Steady  England 89.53
3 Steady  Australia 86.35
4 Steady  Ireland 84.66
5 Steady  Scotland 82.18
6 Increase2  France 82.00
7 Steady  South Africa 81.79
8 Decrease2  Wales 81.21
9 Steady  Argentina 79.91
10 Steady  Fiji 76.46
11 Steady  Japan 74.22
12 Steady  Georgia 72.92
13 Steady  Tonga 71.94
14 Steady  Samoa 71.25
15 Steady  Italy 71.17
16 Steady  Romania 70.15
17 Steady  United States 66.79
18 Steady  Spain 63.05
19 Steady  Namibia 62.78
20 Steady  Russia 61.75
21 Steady  Uruguay 61.24
22 Steady  Canada 59.63
23 Steady  Kenya 59.28
24 Increase1  Portugal 58.87
25 Decrease1  Germany 58.40
26 Steady  Hong Kong 56.50
27 Steady  Belgium 55.87
28 Steady  South Korea 55.50
29 Increase1  Netherlands 53.98
30 Decrease1  Chile 53.91
*Change from the previous week
Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Argentina 13 0 13 0 0.00% 47 1054 -1007
Argentina Argentina XV 2 0 2 0 0.00% 14 121 -107
 Canada 2 1 1 0 50.00% 49 75 -26
 Chile 25 3 20 2 12.00% 281 815 -534
 Colombia 8 8 0 0 100.00% 395 34 +361
 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 100.00% 95 0 +95
France France XV 2 0 2 0 0.00% 13 140 -127
 Germany 4 0 4 0 0.00% 39 112 -79
 Hong Kong 1 0 1 0 0.00% 3 37 -34
 Kenya 2 0 2 0 0.00% 42 45 -3
 Mexico 2 2 0 0 100.00% 126 19 +107
England Oxford and Cambridge 2 0 2 0 0.00% 13 102 −89
 Paraguay 23 14 9 0 60.86% 459 436 +23
 Peru 9 9 0 0 100.00% 404 61 +343
 Portugal 2 0 2 0 0.00% 17 89 -72
 Trinidad and Tobago 5 4 1 0 80.00% 75 71 +4
 United Arab Emirates 1 1 0 0 100.00% 66 3 +63
 United States 2 1 1 0 50.00% 27 74 -47
 Uruguay 25 3 22 0 12.00% 229 852 -623
 Venezuela 9 8 1 0 88.88% 256 98 +158
Total 140 55 83 2 39.29% 2650 4238 -1588

Current squad[edit]

Brazil's initial 26-man squad ahead of their opening game against Chile.[10]

1 Caíque Silva and Pedro Bengaló, who was uncapped, were called up to the squad ahead of Brazil's clash against the United States.

2 Cléber Dias, Ariel Rodrigues, Robert Tenório and Endy Willian were added to the squad ahead of the third round game against Uruguay.

3 Gabriel Paganini was added to the squad ahead of Brazil playing Argentina XV in round 4.

4 Luan Almeida, Lucas Duque and Luca Tranquez were added to the squad ahead of the final round.

Head Coach: Argentina Rodolfo Ambrosio

  • Caps updated: 7 March 2017

Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by World Rugby.

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Almeida, LuanLuan Almeida 4 Hooker (1994-12-28) 28 December 1994 (age 22) 2 Brazil Jacareí
Danielewicz, DanielDaniel Danielewicz Hooker (1982-08-08) 8 August 1982 (age 34) 15 Brazil Desterro
Rosetti, YanYan Rosetti Hooker (1993-05-07) 7 May 1993 (age 23) 16 Argentina CUBA
Willian, EndyEndy Willian 2 Hooker (1995-05-26) 26 May 1995 (age 21) 1 Brazil Curitiba
Alves, AlexandreAlexandre Alves Prop (1996-07-23) 23 July 1996 (age 20) 3 Brazil Desterro
Ancina, VitorVitor Ancina Prop (1987-11-24) 24 November 1987 (age 29) 6 Brazil Curitiba
Bengaló, PedroPedro Bengaló 1 Prop (1995-10-14) 14 October 1995 (age 21) 3 Brazil Desterro
Paulo, JonatasJonatas Paulo Prop (1985-05-14) 14 May 1985 (age 31) 13 Brazil São Paulo Saracens
Rebolo, WiltonWilton Rebolo Prop (1995-08-02) 2 August 1995 (age 21) 13 Brazil São José
Rocha, MatheusMatheus Rocha Prop (1997-08-15) 15 August 1997 (age 19) 2 Brazil Jacareí
Silva, CaíqueCaíque Silva 1 Prop (1993-11-21) 21 November 1993 (age 23) 9 Brazil Niterói
López, DiegoDiego López Lock (1987-03-16) 16 March 1987 (age 30) 11 Brazil Pasteur
Paganini, GabrielGabriel Paganini 3 Lock (1993-03-04) 4 March 1993 (age 24) 5 Brazil Bandeirantes
Piero, LucasLucas Piero Lock (1991-09-25) 25 September 1991 (age 25) 23 Brazil Desterro
Tissot, FelipeFelipe Tissot Lock (1988-02-04) 4 February 1988 (age 29) 4 Brazil Curitiba
Viera, Luiz GustavoLuiz Gustavo Viera Lock (1994-07-14) 14 July 1994 (age 22) 9 France Villefranche
Arruda, AndréAndré Arruda Flanker (1987-03-16) 16 March 1987 (age 30) 7 Brazil Desterro
Bergo, ArturArtur Bergo Flanker (1994-03-07) 7 March 1994 (age 23) 7 Brazil SPAC
da Ros, João LuizJoão Luiz da Ros Flanker (1982-07-10) 10 July 1982 (age 34) 22 Brazil Desterro
Daniel, MatheusMatheus Daniel Flanker (1990-06-19) 19 June 1990 (age 26) 11 Brazil Jacareí
Dias, CléberCléber Dias 2 Flanker (1995-07-03) 3 July 1995 (age 21) 9 Brazil Wallys
Smith, NickNick Smith (c) Number 8 (1986-05-01) 1 May 1986 (age 30) 22 Brazil SPAC
Cremer, BeukesBeukes Cremer Scrum-half (1987-10-21) 21 October 1987 (age 29) 16 Brazil Poli
Cruz, MatheusMatheus Cruz Scrum-half (1996-02-24) 24 February 1996 (age 21) 4 Brazil Jacareí
Duque, LucasLucas Duque 4 Scrum-half (1984-03-15) 15 March 1984 (age 33) 11 Brazil São José
Coghetto, GuilhermeGuilherme Coghetto Fly-half (1992-05-02) 2 May 1992 (age 24) 14 Brazil Desterro
Reeves, JoshJosh Reeves Fly-half (1990-08-07) 7 August 1990 (age 26) 4 Brazil Jacareí
Duque, MoisésMoisés Duque Centre (1988-12-21) 21 December 1988 (age 28) 17 Brazil São José
Sancery, FelipeFelipe Sancery Centre (1994-05-27) 27 May 1994 (age 22) 16 Brazil São José
Smanio, LuanLuan Smanio Centre (1993-08-27) 27 August 1993 (age 23) 4 Brazil Desterro
Giantorno, StefanoStefano Giantorno Wing (1991-09-27) 27 September 1991 (age 25) 12 Brazil Niteroí
Rodrigues, ArielAriel Rodrigues 2 Wing 2 Brazil Jacareí
Tenório, RobertRobert Tenório 2 Wing (1996-07-27) 27 July 1996 (age 20) 5 Brazil Pasteur
Tranquez, LucaLuca Tranquez 4 Wing (1994-03-12) 12 March 1994 (age 23) 13 Brazil SPAC
van Niekerk, De WetDe Wet van Niekerk Wing 3 Brazil São Paulo Saracens
Sancery, DanielDaniel Sancery Fullback (1994-05-27) 27 May 1994 (age 22) 16 Brazil São José

Notable players[edit]

  • In 2011 Lucas "Tanque" Duque and his brother Moisés Duque were given trials with professional teams in France.[11]
  • Since 2015 Luiz Vieira has been playing for the second team of the TOP14 team Oyonnax.

Media coverage[edit]

Before 2016, most of Brazil's games were aired through SporTV, a paid television network. In 2016, changes were made to Brazil's broadcasting; more commonly available RedeTV! would air games involving the South American Rugby Championship, while ESPN Brasil holds the rights to the Americas Rugby Championship.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Tupi is the new emblem of Brazil National Team=BrasilRugby.com – In Portuguese". Retrieved 10 May 2012. 
  2. ^ Edições Leia, 1950.
  3. ^ a b Bath, Richard (ed.). The Complete Book of Rugby. p. 64. Seven Oaks Ltd, 1997. ISBN 9781862000131.
  4. ^ Niterói Rugby História do Rugby Brasileiro. Acessado em 8/2/2012.
  5. ^ a b "History of Rugby (in Portuguese)". Portal do Rugby. Retrieved 4 May 2016. 
  6. ^ Stoney, Emma (5 October 2012). "Soccer-Crazy Brazil Opening Its Arms to Rugby". New York Times. Retrieved 4 May 2016. 
  7. ^ Panja, Tariq (7 January 2015). "Brazil Soccer Debacle Boosts Rugby Before Olympic Return". Bloomberg. Retrieved 4 May 2016. 
  8. ^ A nova camisa dos Tupis! (YouTube). Confederação Brasileira de Rugby. February 3, 2016. 
  9. ^ "World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 20 March 2017. 
  10. ^ Brazil names squad for ARC opener
  11. ^ "Duque brothers to have trial for teams in France". 16 December 2011. 

External links[edit]