Brazil women's national football team

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Brazil
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Seleção (The National Squad)
As Canarinhas (The Female Canaries)
Verde-Amarela (Green-and-Yellow)
AssociationConfederação Brasileira de Futebol (CBF)
ConfederationCONMEBOL (South America)
Head coachPia Sundhage
CaptainMarta
Most capsFormiga (206)
Top scorerMarta (115)
FIFA codeBRA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 9 Steady (5 August 2022)[1]
Highest2 (March 2009)
Lowest11 (September 2019)
First international
 United States 2–1 Brazil 
(Jesolo, Italy; 22 July 1986)
Biggest win
 Brazil 15–0 Bolivia 
(Uberlândia, Brazil; 18 January 1995)
 Brazil 15–0 Peru 
(Mar del Plata, Argentina; 2 March 1998)
Biggest defeat
 United States 6–0 Brazil 
(Denver, United States; 26 September 1999)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991)
Best resultRunners-up (2007)
Olympic Games
Appearances8 (first in 1996)
Best resultSilver medal.svg Silver medallist (2004, 2008)
Copa América
Appearances9 (first in 1991)
Best resultChampions (1991, 1995, 1998, 2003, 2010, 2014, 2018, 2022)
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2000)
Best resultRunners-up (2000)

The Brazil women's national football team (Portuguese: Seleção Brasileira Feminina de futebol) represents Brazil in international women's football and is run by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF). It has participated in eight editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup, finishing as runner-up in 2007, and seven editions of the Copa América Femenina.

Brazil played their first game on 22 July 1986 against the United States, losing 2–1.[2]

The team finished the 1999 World Cup in third place and the 2007 in second, losing to Germany in the final, 2–0. Brazil won the silver medal twice in the Olympic Games, in 2004 and 2008, after getting fourth place in the two previous editions.

Brazil is the most successful women's national team in South America, having won the first four editions of the Copa América championship. Since 1999, they have been contenders for the World title. In 1998 and 1999, the team finished as the runners-up at the Women's U.S. Cup.

In 2017, the Brazilian Football Confederation's decision to fire head coach Emily Lima sparked protest among the team's players. The dispute evolved into an argument for greater wages, and more respect and recognition for the country's female football players. As a result, players such as Cristiane, Rosana, and Francielle announced their retirement from international football, hoping that this decision might make a difference in the years to come.[3][4]

History[edit]

Although today the Brazilian Women's National Team is one of the best in the world, it was not that long ago that women were not even allowed to watch a game. The women's game filtered sporadically throughout Brazil with popular traction in the early 20th century. Magazines such as O imparcial and Jornal dos sports covered the women's game praising their achievements in local cup competitions.[5] Yet, the traditional order of futbol as "purely masculine" came into contention resulting in the games downfall. Until, the mid-1940s when Brazil became a dictatorship subsequently banning the women's game.[6] Banned by the Minister of Education and Health in 1941, eugenic ideologies from the new dictatorship called for the protection of womanly bodies, thus sports became a disqualified endeavor.[7] The game was male dominated, and those who could not perform well were even called feminine at times. Throughout the time of the ban, women were observed playing quite frequently forcing the Conselho Nacional de Desportos (CND) to take charge and reissue bans that were not working. In 1965, Deliberation no. 7 further forced an end to all women's sports in Brazil, not just football.[6] This ban would not be lifted until the late 1970s, when Brazil passed Amnesty Laws allowing political exiles back into the country.[6] A surge of Brazilian feminists returned to their country eager to change the social landscape inspired by the Western feminist movements of the 60s and 70s.[6] Fan bases for the women's team with a new identity rooted themselves in the fabric of history and with the support of the general public the women's game led a rise in feminism that swept across the country.[8] Finally in 1979 the National Sports Council of Brazil passed Deliberation no. 10 reinstating the women's game.[6] Today the National team has won the Copa America 7 times and has made it to the world cup finals where they were beaten by Germany. Perhaps the most impressive statistic that even though the team played its first official match ever in 1986 only 5 years later they won their first title in Copa America and only 9 years after that they were challenging the world's best.

Futebol Feminino[edit]

Brazil was Latin America's first country to legally recognize futebol feminino. As the first nation to popularize the women's game it was a hard sell for many Brazilian's caught up with traditional gender roles. Up until the national team started participating on the international stage. After the debut of women's association football in the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta the women's game skyrocketed in admiration. In order to capitalize off of the teams commencement and fourth-place finish the State of São Paulo created Paulistana.[5] The Paulistana was a domestic competition meant to attract young up and coming players for the national team. However, the methodology of Paulistana linked itself to the process futbol feminization. The administrators and managers who ran the competition scalped white, beautiful, and non-masculine players.[5] An attempt to beautify the women's sport for the largely male population of futbol consumers.[5] The 1999 World Cup golden boot winner Sissi noticed the negative effects of beautification over athletics and left for overseas competition.[5] The introduction of the Campeonato Brasileiro de Futebol Feminino in 2013 reinvigorated the domestic competition attracting the Brazilian stars of the national team back into the country.

Team image[edit]

Nicknames[edit]

The Brazil women's national football team has been known or nicknamed as the "Seleção (The National Squad)", "As Canarinhas (The Female Canaries)" or "Verde-Amarela (Green-and-Yellow)".

Kits and crest[edit]

Kit suppliers[edit]

Kit provider Period Ref
Nike ????–present

Under the CBF requirements both men's and women's national teams are supplied by the same kit manufacturer. The current sponsorship deal is signed with Nike. Although, the details of the kit differ in style. The crest of the women's national team is produced without the five star accolades from previous men's World Cup titles. In honor of the burgeoning history of the women's team they will only attach star merits based on their own performances.[9]

FIFA world rankings[edit]

As of 1 August 2021[10]

  Worst Ranking    Best Ranking    Worst Mover    Best Mover  

Brazil's FIFA world rankings
Rank Year Games
Played
Won Lost Drawn Best Worst
Rank Move Rank Move
7 2021 9 5 1 3 Increase Decrease

Results and fixtures[edit]

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

Legend

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2021[edit]

17 September Friendly Brazil  3–1  Argentina João Pessoa, Paraíba
14:00
Report Stadium: Almeidão
Referee: Deborah Cecilia Correia (Brazil)
20 September Friendly Brazil  4–1  Argentina Campina Grande, Paraíba
14:00
Report Stadium: Amigão
Referee: Thayslane Costa (Brazil)
23 October Friendly Australia  3–1  Brazil Sydney, Australia
03:50 Report
Stadium: CommBank Stadium
Attendance: 15,270
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
26 October Friendly Australia  2–2  Brazil Sydney, Australia
Stadium: Western Sydney Stadium
25 November Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino de Manaus 2021 Brazil  6–1  India Manaus, Amazonas
Report
Stadium: Arena da Amazônia
Referee: Daiane Caroline Muniz (Brazil)
28 November Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino de Manaus 2021 Brazil  4–1  Venezuela Manaus, Amazonas
Report Stadium: Arena da Amazônia
Referee: Charly Wendy Straub Deretti (Brazil)

2022[edit]

19 February Tournoi de France France  2–1  Brazil Caen, France
17:10 Katoto 23', 59' Report Marta 19' (pen.) Stadium: Stade Michel d'Ornano
Attendance: 12,050
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
22 February Tournoi de France Brazil  0–0  Finland Le Havre, France
14:00 Report Stadium: Stade Océane
Referee: Victoria Beyer (France)
7 April Friendly Spain  1–1  Brazil Alicante, Spain
13:00 Putellas 8' Report Geyse 39' Stadium: Estadio José Rico Pérez
Referee: Rebecca Welch (England)
11 April Friendly Brazil  3–1  Hungary San Pedro del Pinatar, Spain
Report
Stadium: Pinatar Arena
Referee: Ainara Acevedo (Spain)
24 June Friendly Denmark  2–1  Brazil Copenhagen, Denmark
Report
Stadium: Parken Stadium
Referee: Henrikke Nervik (Norway)
28 June Friendly Sweden  3–1  Brazil Solna Municipality, Sweden
Stadium: Friends Arena
Attendance: 33,218
Referee: Sandra Braz (Portugal)
9 July Copa América GS Brazil  4–0  Argentina Armenia, Colombia
19:00
Report Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: María Carvajal (Chile)
12 July Copa América GS Uruguay  0–3  Brazil Armenia, Colombia
16:00 Report
Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: Zulma Quiñónez (Paraguay)
18 July Copa América GS Venezuela  0–4  Brazil Armenia, Colombia
16:00 Report
Stadium: Estadio Centenario
Referee: Zulma Quiñónez (Paraguay)
21 July Copa América GS Brazil  6–0  Peru Cali, Colombia
19:00 Report (CONMEBOL) Stadium: Estadio Olímpico Pascual Guerrero
Referee: Susana Corella (Ecuador)
26 July Copa América SF Brazil  2–0  Paraguay Bucaramanga, Colombia
19:00 Report (FIFA) Stadium: Estadio Alfonso López
Referee: Anahí Fernández (Uruguay)
2 September Friendly South Africa  0–3  Brazil Soweto, South Africa
18:00
Stadium: Orlando Stadium
Referee: Maria Rivet (Mauritania)
5 September Friendly South Africa  0–6  Brazil South Africa
18:00
7 October Friendly Norway  v  Brazil Oslo, Norway
Stadium: Ullevaal Stadium
10 October Friendly Italy  v  Brazil Genoa, Italy
Stadium: Luigi Ferraris Stadium

2023[edit]

February 2023 UEFA–CONMEBOL Women's Finalissima England  v  Brazil TBC (Europe)

Head-to-head record[edit]

Counted for the FIFA A-level matches only.[11]
As of 30 September 2022
Nations First played P W D L GF GA GD Confederation
 Argentina 1995 20 17 1 2 68 13 55 CONMEBOL
 Australia 1988 21 8 2 11 30 34 -4 AFC
 Bolivia 1995 5 5 0 0 40 1 39 CONMEBOL
 Cameroon 2012 1 1 0 0 5 0 5 CAF
 Canada 1996 28 11 8 9 49 30 19 CONCACAF
 Chile 1991 15 14 1 0 53 5 48 CONMEBOL
 China 1986 13 6 6 1 27 9 18 AFC
 Colombia 1998 10 9 1 0 43 4 39 CONMEBOL
 Costa Rica 2000 5 5 0 0 20 1 19 CONCACAF
 Denmark 2007 7 3 1 2 9 8 0 UEFA
 Ecuador 1995 8 8 0 0 67 2 65 CONMEBOL
 England 2017 3 1 0 2 3 4 -1 UEFA
 Equatorial Guinea 2011 1 1 0 0 3 0 3 CAF
 Finland 1999 2 1 1 0 3 1 2 UEFA
 France 2003 11 0 5 6 9 17 -8 UEFA
 Germany 1995 12 1 4 7 13 28 -15 UEFA
 Ghana 2008 1 1 0 0 5 1 4 CAF
 Great Britain 2012 1 0 0 1 0 1 -1 UEFA
 Greece 2004 1 1 0 0 7 0 7 UEFA
 Haiti 2003 1 1 0 0 5 0 5 CONCACAF
 Hungary 1996 5 5 0 0 20 3 15 UEFA
 Iceland 2017 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 UEFA
 India 2021 1 1 0 0 6 1 5 AFC
 Italy 1999 7 6 1 0 18 6 12 UEFA
 Jamaica 2007 2 2 0 0 8 0 8 CONCACAF
 Japan 1991 11 4 2 5 12 16 -4 AFC
 Mexico 1998 15 14 0 1 65 9 56 CONCACAF
 Netherlands 1988 8 3 4 1 11 9 2 UEFA
 New Zealand 2007 8 4 2 2 14 4 10 OFC
 Nigeria 1999 2 2 0 0 7 4 3 AFC
 North Korea 2008 2 2 0 0 4 1 3 AFC
 Norway 1988 8 4 2 2 14 9 5 UEFA
 Paraguay 2006 5 5 0 0 19 2 17 CONMEBOL
 Peru 1998 4 4 0 0 26 0 26 CONMEBOL
 Poland 2019 1 1 0 0 3 1 2 UEFA
 Portugal 2012 2 2 0 0 7 1 6 UEFA
 Russia 1996 6 4 2 0 16 2 14 UEFA
 Scotland 1996 5 4 0 1 21 3 18 UEFA
 South Africa 2016 4 3 1 0 12 0 12 CAF
 South Korea 1999 5 4 0 1 11 3 8 AFC
 Spain 2015 4 2 1 1 5 4 1 UEFA
 Sweden 1991 11 5 2 4 15 12 3 UEFA
  Switzerland 2015 1 1 0 0 4 1 3 UEFA
 Thailand 1988 1 1 0 0 9 0 9 AFC
 Trinidad and Tobago 2000 2 2 0 0 22 0 22 CONCACAF
 Ukraine 1996 1 1 0 0 7 0 7 UEFA
 Uruguay 2006 5 4 1 0 17 0 17 CONMEBOL
 United States 1986 40 4 5 31 32 87 -55 CONCACAF
 Venezuela 1991 9 9 0 0 49 2 47 CONMEBOL
 Zambia 2021 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 CAF

Coaching staff[edit]

Current coaching staff[edit]

Position Name Ref.
Head coach Sweden Pia Sundhage
Assistant coach Sweden Lilie Person [12]
Brazil Bia Vaz [12]
Sweden Anders Johansson [12]
Goalkeeping coach Brazil Thiago Mehl [13]
Fitness coach Brazil Fábio Guerreiro [14]

Manager history[edit]

  • Updated on 30 September 2022, after the match against  Colombia.[11]
Name Period P W D L Win % Notes
Brazil João Varella 1986–1988 8 3 2 3 037.50
Brazil Edil 1991 2 2 0 0 100.00
Brazil Lula Paiva 1991 0 0 0 0 ! Only managed unofficial matches in 1991
Brazil Fernando Pires 1991 3 1 0 2 033.33
Brazil Ademar Fonseca 1995 13 8 0 5 061.54
Brazil Ricardo Vágner (interim) 1995 0 0 0 0 ! Replaced manager Ademar Fonseca for just one match, an unofficial friendly
Brazil Zé Duarte 1996–1998 30 19 4 7 063.33
Brazil Wilsinho 1999 13 7 2 4 053.85
Brazil José Duarte 2000 11 5 1 5 045.45
Brazil Paulo Gonçalves 2001–2003 18 10 3 5 055.56
Brazil René Simões 2004 7 4 0 3 057.14
Brazil Luiz Antônio September 2004 – September 2006 0 0 0 0 ! Only managed unofficial matches in 2005
Brazil José Teixeira October 2006 – November 2006 0 0 0 0 ! Only managed three unofficial matches, where the team consisted of players of the FPF
Brazil Jorge Barcellos November 2006–30 August 2008 34 23 2 9 067.65
Brazil Kleiton Lima September 2008–23 November 2011 28 21 6 1 075.00
Brazil Jorge Barcellos 23 November 2011 – 23 November 2012 13 7 0 6 053.85
Brazil Márcio Oliveira 23 November 2012 – 14 April 2014 21 10 7 4 047.62
Brazil Vadão 14 April 2014 – 1 November 2016 53 30 12 11 056.60
Brazil Portugal Emily Lima 1 November 2016 – 22 September 2017 13 7 1 5 053.85
Brazil Vadão 25 September 2017 – 22 July 2019 27 14 1 12 051.85
Sweden Pia Sundhage 24 July 2019– 44 27 11 6 061.36

Players[edit]

The Brazilian Football Confederation does not publish appearance statistics for its female players, so statistics here are unofficial.

Caps and goals as of 30 September 2022, considering only FIFA A-matches, after the match against  South Africa.[15]

Current squad[edit]

The following players were called up for friendlies against  Norway and  Italy on 7 and 10 October 2022, respectively.[16]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Letícia Izidoro (1994-08-13)13 August 1994 (aged 28) 13 0 Brazil Corinthians
1GK Luciana (1987-07-24)24 July 1987 (aged 35) 37 0 Brazil Ferroviária

2DF Antônia (1994-04-26)26 April 1994 (aged 28) 20 0 Spain Levante
2DF Fe Palermo (1996-08-18)18 August 1996 (aged 26) 11 1 Brazil São Paulo
2DF Kathellen (1996-04-26)26 April 1996 (aged 26) 15 1 Spain Real Madrid
2DF Lauren (2002-09-13)13 September 2002 (aged 20) 3 0 Spain Madrid CFF
2DF Rafaelle (1991-06-18)18 June 1991 (aged 31) 77 8 England Arsenal
2DF Tainara (1999-04-21)21 April 1999 (aged 23) 19 0 Germany Bayern Munich
2DF Tamires (1987-10-10)10 October 1987 (aged 34) 131 6 Brazil Corinthians
2DF Tarciane (2003-05-27)27 May 2003 (aged 19) 0 0 Brazil Corinthians

3MF Adriana (1996-11-17)17 November 1996 (aged 25) 34 10 Brazil Corinthians
3MF Ana Vitória (2000-03-06)6 March 2000 (aged 22) 9 0 Portugal Benfica
3MF Ary Borges (1999-12-28)28 December 1999 (aged 22) 20 4 Brazil Palmeiras
3MF Duda Francelino (1995-07-18)18 July 1995 (aged 27) 23 3 Brazil Flamengo
3MF Duda Sampaio (2001-05-18)18 May 2001 (aged 21) 6 1 Brazil Internacional
3MF Kerolin (1999-11-17)17 November 1999 (aged 22) 24 5 United States North Carolina Courage
3MF Millene (1994-12-13)13 December 1994 (aged 27) 12 2 Brazil Internacional
3MF Yaya (2002-01-23)23 January 2002 (aged 20) 0 0 Brazil São Paulo

4FW Bia Zaneratto (1993-12-17)17 December 1993 (aged 28) 102 34 Brazil Palmeiras
4FW Debinha (1991-10-20)20 October 1991 (aged 30) 129 56 United States North Carolina Courage
4FW Gabi Nunes (1997-03-10)10 March 1997 (aged 25) 13 3 Spain Madrid CFF
4FW Geyse (1998-03-27)27 March 1998 (aged 24) 34 6 Spain Barcelona
4FW Jaqueline Ribeiro (2000-03-31)31 March 2000 (aged 22) 1 0 Brazil Corinthians
4FW Ludmila (1994-12-01)1 December 1994 (aged 27) 39 5 Spain Atlético Madrid

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players were named to a squad in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Lorena (1997-05-06) 6 May 1997 (age 25) 15 0 Brazil Grêmio v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
GK Natascha (1997-09-27) 27 September 1997 (age 25) 1 0 Brazil Corinthians v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
GK Gabi Barbieri (2003-03-07) 7 March 2003 (age 19) 0 0 Brazil Internacional v.  Sweden, 28 June 2022
GK Mayara (2001-08-03) 3 August 2001 (age 21) 0 0 Brazil Internacional v.  Hungary, 11 April 2022
GK Jully (1999-04-18) 18 April 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Brazil Palmeiras 2022 Tournoi de France

DF Day Silva (1990-09-26) 26 September 1990 (age 32) 1 0 Brazil Palmeiras v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
DF Letícia Santos (1994-12-02) 2 December 1994 (age 27) 38 0 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
DF Thaís (1996-05-01) 1 May 1996 (age 26) 5 0 Brazil Palmeiras v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
DF Thaís Regina (1999-03-27) 27 March 1999 (age 23) 1 0 Brazil São Paulo v.  Hungary, 11 April 2022
DF Giovanna Campiolo (1996-06-14) 14 June 1996 (age 26) 0 0 Brazil Corinthians v.  Hungary, 11 April 2022
DF Daiane (1997-09-07) 7 September 1997 (age 25) 15 0 Brazil Flamengo 2022 Tournoi de France
DF Bruninha (2002-06-16) 16 June 2002 (age 20) 5 0 United States NJ/NY Gotham 2021 International Women's Football Tournament of Manaus
DF Yasmim (1996-10-28) 28 October 1996 (age 25) 1 1 Brazil Corinthians 2021 International Women's Football Tournament of Manaus

MF Duda Santos (1996-03-24) 24 March 1996 (age 26) 7 2 Brazil Palmeiras v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
MF Micaelly (2000-09-26) 26 September 2000 (age 22) 1 0 Brazil São Paulo v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
MF Angelina (2000-01-26) 26 January 2000 (age 22) 20 1 United States OL Reign 2022 Copa América Femenina
MF Luana (1993-05-02) 2 May 1993 (age 29) 24 1 Brazil Corinthians 2022 Copa América Femenina
MF Ingryd (1997-11-24) 24 November 1997 (age 24) 2 0 Brazil Ferroviária v.  Hungary, 11 April 2022
MF Marta (1986-02-19) 19 February 1986 (age 36) 172 115 United States Orlando Pride v.  Spain, 7 April 2022INJ
MF Julia Bianchi (1997-10-07) 7 October 1997 (age 24) 11 2 Brazil Palmeiras 2022 Tournoi de FranceCOVID
MF Ivana Fuso (2001-03-12) 12 March 2001 (age 21) 4 0 Germany Bayer Leverkusen 2021 International Women's Football Tournament of Manaus
MF Katrine (1998-04-19) 19 April 1998 (age 24) 3 0 Brazil Palmeiras 2021 International Women's Football Tournament of Manaus
MF Andressa Alves (1992-11-10) 10 November 1992 (age 29) 88 20 Italy Roma v.  Australia, 26 October 2021

FW Gabi Portilho (1995-07-18) 18 July 1995 (age 27) 8 0 Brazil Corinthians v.  South Africa, 5 September 2022
FW Gio Queiroz (2003-06-21) 21 June 2003 (age 19) 12 2 England Everton 2022 Copa América Femenina

  • ALT: Alternate
  • COVID: Player withdrew from the current squad due to testing positively for COVID-19 or having to self-isolate because of it
  • INJ: Withdrew due to injury
  • PRE: Preliminary squad / standby

Records[edit]

As of 30 September 2022[15]

*Players in bold are still active, at least at club level.

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA Women's World Cup[edit]

FIFA Women's World Cup record Qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
China 1991 Group stage 9th 3 1 0 2 1 7 Squad 2 2 0 0 12 1
Sweden 1995 9th 3 1 0 2 3 8 Squad 5 5 0 0 44 1
United States 1999 Third place 3rd 6 3 2 1 16 9 Squad 6 6 0 0 66 3
United States 2003 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 9 4 Squad 3 3 0 0 18 2
China 2007 Runners-up 2nd 6 5 0 1 17 4 Squad 7 6 0 1 30 4
Germany 2011 Quarter-finals 5th 4 3 1 0 9 2 Squad 7 7 0 0 25 2
Canada 2015 Round of 16 9th 4 3 0 1 4 1 Squad 7 5 1 1 22 3
France 2019 10th 4 2 0 2 7 5 Squad 7 7 0 0 31 2
Australia New Zealand 2023 Qualified 6 6 0 0 20 0
Total Runners-up 9/9 34 20 4 10 66 40 50 47 1 2 268 18

Olympic Games[edit]

Olympic Games record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
United States 1996 Fourth place 4th 5 1 2 2 7 8 Squad
Australia 2000 Fourth place 4th 5 2 0 3 5 6 Squad
Greece 2004  Silver 2nd 6 4 0 2 15 4 Squad
China 2008  Silver 2nd 6 4 1 1 11 5 Squad
United Kingdom 2012 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 6 3 Squad
Brazil 2016 Fourth place 4th 6 2 3 1 9 3 Squad
Japan 2020 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 2 0 9 3 Squad
France 2024 Qualified
Total Silver medal.svg Silver 8/8 36 17 7 11 62 32

Copa América Femenina[edit]

Copa América Femenina record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
Brazil 1991 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 12 1
Brazil 1995 1st 5 5 0 0 44 1
Argentina 1998 1st 6 6 0 0 66 3
Peru Argentina Ecuador 2003 1st 3 3 0 0 18 2
Argentina 2006 Runners-up 2nd 7 6 0 1 30 4
Ecuador 2010 Champions 1st 7 7 0 0 25 2
Ecuador 2014 1st 7 5 1 1 22 3
Chile 2018 1st 7 7 0 0 31 2
Colombia 2022 1st 6 6 0 0 20 0
Total 8 Titles 9/9 50 47 1 2 268 18

CONCACAF W Championship[edit]

CONCACAF W Championship record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
United States 2000 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 22 3
Total Runners-up 5 3 1 1 22 3

Pan American Games[edit]

Pan American Games record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad
Canada 1999 Did not enter
Dominican Republic 2003 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 14 2 Squad
Brazil 2007 1st 6 6 0 0 33 0 Squad
Mexico 2011 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 2 0 6 2 Squad
Canada 2015 Champions 1st 5 5 0 0 20 3 Squad
Peru 2019 Did not enter
Chile 2023 Did not enter / qualify
Colombia 2027 To be determined
Total 3 Titles 4/8 20 18 2 0 73 7

South American Games[edit]

South American Games record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA
Chile 2014  Bronze 5 3 2 0 9 1
Bolivia 2018 to present U-20 Tournament
Total Bronze 5 3 2 0 9 1

Algarve Cup[edit]

The Algarve Cup is an invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious and longest-running women's international football events and has been nicknamed the "Mini FIFA Women's World Cup".[17]

Portugal Algarve Cup record
Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Portugal 2015 Seventh-place match 7th 4 2 1 1 7 4
Portugal 2016 Runners-up 2nd 4 3 0 1 8 3
Total 2/27 8 5 1 2 15 7

SheBelieves Cup[edit]

The SheBelieves Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's football hosted in the United States.

United States SheBelieves Cup record
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
2016 Did not enter
2017
2018
2019 Fourth place 3 0 0 3 2 6 Brazil Vadão
2020 Did not enter
2021 Runners-up 3 2 0 1 6 3 Sweden Pia Sundhage
Total 2/6 6 2 0 4 8 9

Tournament of Nations[edit]

The Tournament of Nations is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's football hosted in the United States in non-World Cup and non-Olympic years.

United States Tournament of Nations record
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
2017 Fourth place 3 0 1 2 5 11 Brazil Emily Lima
2018 Third place 3 1 0 2 4 8 BrazilVadão
Total 2/2 6 1 1 4 9 19

Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino[edit]

Brazil Torneio Internacional de Futebol Feminino record
Year Result Position Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
Brazil 2009 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 14 5
Brazil 2010 Runners-up 2nd 4 2 2 0 8 4
Brazil 2011 Champions 1st 4 3 0 1 11 3
Brazil 2012 Champions 1st 4 2 1 1 9 5
Brazil 2013 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 10 1
Brazil 2014 Champions 1st 4 3 1 0 11 3
Brazil 2015 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 22 2
Brazil 2016 Champions 1st 4 4 0 0 18 4
Brazil 2019 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 1 0 5 0
Brazil 2021 Champions 1st 3 3 0 0 12 2
Total 10/10 8 titles 37 29 6 2 120 29

Honours[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 5 August 2022. Retrieved 5 August 2022.
  2. ^ "Seleção Brasileira Feminina (Brazilian National Womens´ Team) 1986–1995". RSSSF. 20 September 2014. Retrieved 23 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Soccer: Cristiane among players to quit Brazilian National Team". Excelle Sports. 28 September 2017. Archived from the original on 30 October 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  4. ^ Panja, Tariq (6 October 2017). "Brazil's Women Soccer Players in Revolt Against Federation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e Snyder, Cara (2018). "The Soccer Tournament as Beauty Pageant: Eugenic Logics in Brazilian Women'sFutebol Feminino". WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly. 46 (1–2): 181–198. doi:10.1353/wsq.2018.0025. ISSN 1934-1520. S2CID 89661705.
  6. ^ a b c d e Agergaard, Sine; Tiesler, Nina Clara (21 August 2014), "Current fluxes in women's soccer migration", Women, Soccer and Transnational Migration, Routledge, pp. 33–50, doi:10.4324/9780203544617-3, ISBN 978-0-203-54461-7, retrieved 9 April 2021
  7. ^ "In Brazil, Female Warriors Fight for a Level Playing Field". World Justice Project. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  8. ^ ELSEY, BRENDA. FUTBOLERA : a history of women and sports in latin america. Place of publication not identified: UNIV OF TEXAS Press, 2020. Print.
  9. ^ "Brazil Women's Team Drops Stars From Kit". Footy Headlines. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  10. ^ "FIFA". FIFA. 25 June 2021. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  11. ^ a b "Brazil Womens' National Team – Only "A" Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  12. ^ a b c "Pia Sundhage terá novo auxiliar na seleção feminina em 2021; conheça Anders Johansson" [Pia Sundhage will have a new assistant in the women's national team in 2021; know Anders Johansson] (in Brazilian Portuguese). ge. 11 November 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2022.
  13. ^ "Seleção Feminina apresenta novidades no gol na primeira convocação de 2021" [Women's national team present news on goal on the first call-up of 2021] (in Brazilian Portuguese). CBF. 8 January 2021. Retrieved 23 February 2022.
  14. ^ "Membros da comissão técnica da Seleção Feminina acompanham atletas na Europa" [Members of the techinical staff of the women's national team follow athletes in Europe] (in Brazilian Portuguese). CBF. 20 November 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2022.
  15. ^ a b "Arquivo da Seleção Brasileira Feminina (Brazilian National Womens´ Team Archive)". RSSSF. Retrieved 2 February 2022.
  16. ^ "Seleção Feminina é convocada para amistosos contra Noruega e Itália" [Women's national team is called up for friendlies against Norway and Italy] (in Brazilian Portuguese). CBF. 22 September 2022. Retrieved 30 September 2022.
  17. ^ "Women's game thriving in the Algarve". FIFA. 9 March 2011. Archived from the original on 13 March 2014. Retrieved 13 March 2014.

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural Champions
South American Champions
1991 (First title)
1995 (Second title)
1998 (Third title)
2003 (Fourth title)
Succeeded by
Preceded by South American Champions
2010 (Fifth title)
2014 (Sixth title)
Succeeded by
Incumbents