Brazos County, Texas

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Brazos County
The Brazos County Courthouse in Bryan
The Brazos County Courthouse in Bryan
Official seal of Brazos County
Map of Texas highlighting Brazos County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 30°40′N 96°18′W / 30.66°N 96.3°W / 30.66; -96.3
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1843
Named forBrazos River
SeatBryan
Largest cityCollege Station
Area
 • Total591 sq mi (1,530 km2)
 • Land585 sq mi (1,520 km2)
 • Water5.8 sq mi (15 km2)  1.0%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total233,849
 • Density400/sq mi (150/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district17th
Websitewww.brazoscountytx.gov

Brazos County (/ˈbræzəs/ (listen) BRAZ-əs) is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 census, its population was 233,849.[1][2] The county seat is Bryan.[3] Along with Brazoria County, the county is named for the Brazos River, which forms its western border. The county was formed in 1841 and organized in 1843.[4][5]

Brazos County is part of the Bryan-College Station Metropolitan Statistical Area, which consists of Bryan, College Station, and smaller cities and towns in Brazos, Burleson, and Robertson counties.

History[edit]

In 1837, most of the area of present-day Brazos County was included in Washington County. The Brazos River, which bisected the latter, proved a serious obstacle to county government, and a new county, Navasota, was formed in January 1841. The first court, with Judge R. E. B. Baylor presiding, was held later that year in the home of Joseph Ferguson, fourteen miles west of the site of present Bryan. The county seat, named Boonville for Mordecai Boon, was located on John Austin's league and was surveyed by Hiram Hanover in 1841. In January of the following year Navasota County was renamed Brazos County.[6]

Originally one of the state's poorer counties, the county donated 2,416 acres of land in the 1870s to create Texas A&M University, which has enabled the county to be among the state's most financially successful.

After the Civil War tens of thousands of new residents moved to Brazos County, attracted by its good lands, with plenty of timber and a patchwork of prairies and fertile floodplains. As newcomers poured in by the thousands the county suffered from arson, feuding, shooting and racial violence, including mob lynchings.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 591 square miles (1,530 km2), of which 585 square miles (1,520 km2) is land and 5.8 square miles (15 km2) (1.0%) is water.[8]

Adjacent counties[edit]

The northwest boundary follows the Old Spanish Trail.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850614
18603,096404.2%
18709,205197.3%
188013,57647.5%
189016,65022.6%
190018,85913.3%
191018,9190.3%
192021,97516.2%
193021,835−0.6%
194026,99723.6%
195038,39042.2%
196044,89516.9%
197057,97829.1%
198094,49263.0%
1990121,86229.0%
2000152,41525.1%
2010194,85127.8%
2020233,84920.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1850–2010[10] 2010[11] 2020[12]

2020 census[edit]

Brazos County, Texas - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[11] Pop 2020[12] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 115,252 123,035 59.15% 52.61%
Black or African American alone (NH) 20,827 23,569 10.69% 10.08%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 484 502 0.25% 0.21%
Asian alone (NH) 9,982 14,621 5.12% 6.25%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 82 210 0.04% 0.09%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 246 1,009 0.13% 0.43%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 2,573 7,836 1.32% 3.35%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 45,405 63,067 23.30% 26.97%
Total 194,851 233,849 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 152,415 people, 55,202 households, and 30,416 families residing in the county. The population density was 260 people per square mile (100/km2). There were 59,023 housing units at an average density of 101 per square mile (39/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 74.45% White, 10.72% Black or African American, 0.36% Native American, 4.01% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 8.42% from other races, and 1.97% from two or more races. 17.88% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.3% were of German, 8.4% English, 7.3% Irish and 7.2% American ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 55,202 households, out of which 27.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.30% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.90% were non-families. 25.50% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 21.50% under the age of 18, 32.00% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 13.80% from 45 to 64, and 6.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,104, and the median income for a family was $46,530. Males had a median income of $32,864 versus $24,179 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,212. About 14.00% of families and 26.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.60% of those under age 18 and 10.30% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

Public Transportation[edit]

The Brazos Transit District operates a fixed route bus service and paratransit throughout Bryan and College Station.[14][15]

Major highways[edit]

Airport[edit]

Easterwood Airport, owned by Texas A&M, is the local commercial airport, with flights to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Coulter Field is in Bryan.

Politics[edit]

Unlike most counties that are home to a large university, Brazos County is a Republican stronghold, perhaps reflecting the political views of influential Texas A&M alumni and families of the student body. No Democratic presidential nominee has carried it since Texas native Lyndon Johnson in his 1964 landslide. In 2020, Joe Biden was the first Democrat to win over 40% of its vote since 1968.[citation needed]

United States presidential election results for Brazos County, Texas[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 47,530 55.88% 35,349 41.56% 2,182 2.57%
2016 38,738 57.64% 23,121 34.40% 5,352 7.96%
2012 37,209 66.49% 17,477 31.23% 1,276 2.28%
2008 37,465 63.85% 20,502 34.94% 706 1.20%
2004 37,594 69.22% 16,128 29.70% 587 1.08%
2000 32,864 70.01% 12,359 26.33% 1,718 3.66%
1996 22,082 57.14% 13,968 36.15% 2,594 6.71%
1992 23,943 48.53% 14,819 30.03% 10,578 21.44%
1988 29,369 65.72% 14,885 33.31% 436 0.98%
1984 34,733 73.55% 12,348 26.15% 140 0.30%
1980 17,798 60.25% 9,856 33.37% 1,885 6.38%
1976 15,685 58.75% 10,628 39.81% 387 1.45%
1972 14,243 71.03% 5,692 28.39% 116 0.58%
1968 6,839 43.90% 6,299 40.43% 2,441 15.67%
1964 4,003 33.31% 7,998 66.54% 18 0.15%
1960 4,553 43.46% 5,907 56.38% 17 0.16%
1956 4,942 58.58% 3,463 41.05% 31 0.37%
1952 4,681 52.62% 4,213 47.36% 2 0.02%
1948 1,533 27.72% 3,459 62.55% 538 9.73%
1944 464 10.61% 3,358 76.75% 553 12.64%
1940 617 12.92% 4,151 86.90% 9 0.19%
1936 45 1.69% 2,610 98.16% 4 0.15%
1932 195 6.96% 2,588 92.40% 18 0.64%
1928 738 33.23% 1,480 66.64% 3 0.14%
1924 255 10.43% 2,128 87.07% 61 2.50%
1920 277 12.75% 1,281 58.98% 614 28.27%
1916 273 20.87% 1,027 78.52% 8 0.61%
1912 142 14.90% 762 79.96% 49 5.14%

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Ghost Towns[edit]

Education[edit]

School districts:[18]

Blinn College is the designated community college for all of the county.[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Brazos County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  2. ^ "Brazos County, Texas". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Texas: Individual County Chronologies". Texas Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2008. Archived from the original on April 12, 2017. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  5. ^ "Brazos County". Texas Almanac. Texas State Historical Association. May 21, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  6. ^ Brazos County in Handbook of Texas Online
  7. ^ Nevels, Cynthia Skove (2007). Lynching to Belong: Claiming Whiteness Through Racial Violence. United States: Texas A&M University.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "Decennial Census of Population and Housing by Decades". US Census Bureau.
  10. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  11. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Brazos County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  12. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Brazos County, Texas". United States Census Bureau.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ "The District Fixed Routes". Brazos Transit District. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  15. ^ "The District Paratransit". Brazos Transit District. Retrieved March 16, 2014.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  17. ^ Kapitan, Greg (December 6, 2006). "Millican community is not a city after all". The Eagle. Retrieved October 15, 2022.
  18. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Brazos County, TX" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 16, 2022. Retrieved October 15, 2022. - Text list
  19. ^ Texas Education Code Sec. 130.168. BLINN JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT SERVICE AREA.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°40′N 96°22′W / 30.667°N 96.367°W / 30.667; -96.367