Breakfast burrito

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A breakfast burrito prepared with cheese, bacon, kale and other ingredients
A chorizo and egg breakfast burrito with salsa

The breakfast burrito, sometimes referred to as a breakfast wrap,[1] is a variety of American breakfast composed of breakfast items wrapped inside a flour tortilla burrito. This style was invented and popularized in several regional American cuisines, most notably New Mexican cuisine, Southwestern cuisine, and Tex-Mex. Southwestern breakfast burritos may include scrambled eggs, potatoes, onions, chorizo, or bacon.[2]

Some fast food restaurants such as Burger King, Dunkin' Donuts, McDonald's and Taco Bell purvey the breakfast burrito.[3][4][5][6] The breakfast burrito is also a street food.[7]

History[edit]

The breakfast burrito was invented in Santa Fe, New Mexico.[8] Tia Sophia's, a Mexican café in Santa Fe, claims to have invented the original breakfast burrito[9] in 1975, filling a rolled tortilla with bacon and potatoes, served wet with chili and cheese.[10] Fast food giant McDonald's introduced their version in the late 1980s,[11] and by the 1990s, more fast food restaurants caught on to the style, with Sonic Drive-In, Hardee's, and Carl's Jr. offering breakfast burritos on their menus.[12] In 2014, Taco Bell launched their breakfast menu, which included breakfast burritos.[13]

Preparation[edit]

The breakfast burrito can be prepared with myriad filling ingredients, such as eggs, ham, cheese, onion, peppers, bacon, Canadian bacon, potatoes, sausage, avocado, tomato, spinach, beans, olives and other ingredients.[1][8][14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Burrell, Jackie (April 4, 2016). "Behold the best breakfast burrito ever". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  2. ^ Cheek, Lawrence. (Oct, 2001). Rise and shine – breakfast – Recipe. Sunset.[dead link]
  3. ^ "Burger King is bringing out a new weapon to beat McDonald's and Taco Bell in the fast-food breakfast battles". Business Insider. May 3, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  4. ^ "McDonald's breakfast items ranked by healthiness". San Jose Mercury News. May 13, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  5. ^ Schouten, Lucy (March 10, 2016). "Taco Bell's $1 breakfast burrito: The latest skirmish in the 'breakfast wars'?". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  6. ^ Bellomo, Rheanna O'Neil (February 29, 2016). "Dunkin' Donuts Just Jumped Into the Breakfast Burrito Game". Delish. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  7. ^ The World's Best Street Food: Where to Find It and How to Make It. Lonely Planet Publications. 2012. p. pt29. ISBN 978-1-74321-664-4. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Emina, S.; Eggs, M. (2013). The Breakfast Bible. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 110. ISBN 978-1-4088-3990-4. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Burritoville: Breakfast-burrito highlights". The Santa Fe New Mexican. April 29, 2016. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  10. ^ Anderson, Judith (1998-05-24). "What's Doing In; Santa Fe". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 August 2007. 
  11. ^ Michman, Ronald D.; Greco, Alan James (1995). Retailing Triumphs and Blunders: Victims of Competition in the New Age of Marketing Management. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 182. ISBN 9780899308692. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  12. ^ Andrew F. Smith (2 December 2011). Fast Food and Junk Food: An Encyclopedia of What We Love to Eat [2 volumes]: An Encyclopedia of What We Love to Eat. ABC-CLIO. p. 72. ISBN 978-0-313-39394-5. 
    Andrew F. Smith (28 October 2013). Food and Drink in American History: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia [3 Volumes]: A "Full Course" Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. p. 119. ISBN 978-1-61069-233-5. 
  13. ^ Luna, Nancy (26 March 2014). "Taco Bell breakfast: 8 must-know details, plus early waffle taco reviews". OC Register. Retrieved 4 April 2015. 
  14. ^ Lisk, M. (2009). The Burrito Diet. Al Lavallis Enterprises. p. pt104. ISBN 978-0-557-10069-9. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 

External links[edit]