Breda A.4

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A.4
Breda A.4.png
Role Training biplane
Manufacturer Breda
First flight 1926

The Breda A.4 was a biplane trainer produced in Italy in the mid-1920s. It was of conventional configuration with a two-bay unstaggered wing cellule and seating for the pilot and instructor in tandem open cockpits. Apart from civil use, the A.4 was also adopted by the Regia Aeronautica as a trainer. At least some examples were produced in floatplane configuration as the A.4idro.

Variants[edit]

A.4
Two-seat primary training biplane, powered by a 97 kW (130 hp) Colombo D.110 6-cylinder water-cooled in-line engine.
A.4 HS
Similar to the A.4, powered by a 134 kW (180 hp) Hispano-Suiza 8 V-8 water-cooled piston engine.
A.4idro
Floatplane version of A.4 HS.

Operators[edit]

 Kingdom of Italy

Specifications (A.4 HS landplane)[edit]

Breda A.4 3-view drawing from Le Document aéronautique May,1927

Data from Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in) ; seaplane 9.3 m (31 ft)
  • Wingspan: 10.9 m (35 ft 9 in)
  • Height: 3.3 m (10 ft 10 in) ; seaplane 3.85 m (12.6 ft)
  • Wing area: 40 m2 (430 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 750 kg (1,653 lb) landplane; 950 kg (2,090 lb) seaplane
  • Gross weight: 1,010 kg (2,227 lb) landplane; 1,210 kg (2,670 lb) seaplane
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza 8 V-8 water-cooled piston engine, 130 kW (180 hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed fixed pitch propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 160 km/h (99 mph; 86 kn) landplane; 140 km/h (87 mph; 76 kn) seaplane
  • Stall speed: 60 km/h (37 mph; 32 kn) landplane; 65 km/h (40 mph; 35 kn) seaplane
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Service ceiling: 4,500 m (14,800 ft) landplane; 3,000 m (9,800 ft) seaplane
  • Wing loading: 6.8 kg/m2 (1.4 lb/sq ft)
  • Power/mass: 0.13 kW/kg (0.08 hp/lb) landplane; 0.0934 kW/kg (0.0568 hp/lb) floatplane

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grey, C.G., ed. (1928). Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928. London: Sampson Low, Marston & company, ltd. pp. 156c.

Further reading[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 195.

External links[edit]