Brendan Suhr

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Brendan Suhr
Brendan Suhr in 2007.jpg
Suhr in 2007.
Sport(s) Men's basketball
Biographical details
Born (1951-04-28) April 28, 1951 (age 66)
Fair Lawn, New Jersey
Playing career
1970–1973 Montclair State
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1973–1974 U of Detroit (asst.)
1974–1979 Fairfield (asst.)
1979–1988 Atlanta Hawks (asst.)
1988–1992 Detroit Pistons (asst.)
1992–1994 New Jersey Nets (asst.)
1995–1997 Grand Rapids Mackers/Hoops
1996–1997 Toronto Raptors (asst.)
1997–1999 Orlando Magic (asst.)
2000–2001 Detroit Pistons (asst.)
2004–2007 New York Knicks (asst.)
2010–2012 UCF (dir. development)
2012–2013 UCF (asst.)
2013–2015 UCF (dir. development)
2015–2017 LSU (assoc. HC)
Head coaching record
Overall 65–47 (CBA)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
  • CBA Coach of the Year (1996)

Brendan Ahearn Suhr (born April 28, 1951) is an American basketball coach who was most recently the men's basketball associate head coach at LSU. He is also a former assistant coach in the National Basketball Association, most recently with the New York Knicks where he also served as their former Director of Player Personnel and scout.

Suhr received his bachelor's degree from Montclair State University in 1973 and his master's degree in education administration from Fairfield University in 1979. Suhr began his coaching career on the college level as an assistant at the University of Detroit Mercy, before moving to Fairfield University for five seasons.[1][2]

From 1995 to 1997, Suhr was head coach for the Grand Rapids Mackers (later Hoops) of the Continental Basketball Association. He was CBA Coach of the Year in 1996 for leading Grand Rapids to a 33–23 record and first-place finish in the Eastern Division.[3][4] Grand Rapids went 32–24 and second in the CBA Eastern Division in 1996–97.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brendan Suhr". LSU. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Brendan Suhr". NBA. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  3. ^ "CBA Coach of the Year". APBR. Retrieved December 25, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b http://www.apbr.org/cba7801.html