Brenden Dillon

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Brenden Dillon
Brenden Dillon - Dallas Stars.jpg
Dillon with the Dallas Stars in 2014
Born (1990-11-13) November 13, 1990 (age 30)
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
Height 6 ft 4 in (193 cm)
Weight 225 lb (102 kg; 16 st 1 lb)
Position Defense
Shoots Left
NHL team
Former teams
Washington Capitals
Dallas Stars
San Jose Sharks
National team  Canada
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 2011–present

Brenden Dillon (born November 13, 1990) is a Canadian professional ice hockey player currently playing for the Washington Capitals of the National Hockey League (NHL). Dillon has previously played in the NHL for the Dallas Stars and San Jose Sharks. Undrafted, and prior to turning professional, Dillon played four seasons of major junior ice hockey in the Western Hockey League (WHL) with the Seattle Thunderbirds.

Early life[edit]

Dillon was born on November 13, 1990, in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada[1] to mother Debbie.[2] His father was born and raised in Portugal before he moved to Toronto, so Dillon can speak French and Portuguese.[3] His younger sister was a beach volleyball player for York University.[4]

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

Growing up in Surrey, British Columbia, Dillon played volleyball, basketball, soccer, and track and field through elementary school and high school. He attended a private Catholic elementary school and was named the top track athlete numerous times for the 100m, 200m, and long jump events.[3] At the age of 15, Dillon began summer training with Impact Hockey Development and earned a spot on the junior B Hope Icebreakers of the Pacific Junior Hockey League (PIJHL).[5] Standing at five-foot-two, Dillon went undrafted in the Western Hockey League (WHL) Entry Draft[6] and spent one season in the PIJHL before being signed by the Seattle Thunderbirds.[5]

Dillon spent four seasons with the Thunderbirds, collecting 85 points in 271 games. On March 1, 2011, as an NHL free agent, Dillon signed a three-year, entry-level contract with the Dallas Stars.[7]

Professional career[edit]

Dillon with the Texas Stars in 2011

Dallas Stars[edit]

After signing his contract with the Stars, he was re-assigned to their American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Texas Stars, for the remainder of the 2010–11 season.[8] He played 10 games for the team, accumulating no points and eight penalty minutes.[1] He was invited to the Dallas Stars' training camp prior to the 2011–12 season but was re-assigned to Texas on September 28.[9] After playing 31 games for Texas and recording two goals and 11 assists, Dillon was called up to the NHL level to replace an injured Sheldon Souray.[10] He saw no action during his recall and was subsequently re-assigned back to Texas. Dillon was called up again for the Dallas Stars' last game of the season and made his NHL debut on April 8, 2012, against the St. Louis Blues. He played in 19:59 of ice time and had a game-high six shots on goal, tied for a game-high four hits and co-led the Stars with three blocked shots.[11] Dillon ended the season with the Texas Stars, tied with Jordie Benn for most assists amongst team defensemen, as the Stars failed to qualify for the Calder Cup playoffs.[12]

Due to the 2012–13 NHL lockout, Dillon began the season with the Texas Stars before joining Dallas once an agreement was reached.[12] On February 1, 2013, Dillon registered his first career Gordie Howe hat trick, meaning he recorded a fight, assist, and goal. During that game, he also registered his first career assist and goal in a 4–3 shootout win against the Phoenix Coyotes.[13] Dillon was also selected for his first international appearance with Canada in the 2013 IIHF World Championship.[14] He scored one goal in eight games as Canada would lose in the quarterfinal to the eventual tournament champions Sweden.[12]

The following season, Dillon spent his entire 2013–14 campaign with the Stars and set new career highs. He finished the season with 17 points in 80 regular seasons games and his plus-minus rating ranked fourth amongst all NHL defensemen.[15] The two games he missed during the season was due to a lower-body injury.[16] On October 2, 2014, Dillon signed a one year contract extension to remain with the Stars through the 2014–15 season.[15] Since his rookie season, Dillon was paired with Stephane Robidas on the left side but, once the player was traded to the Anaheim Ducks, Dillon was moved to the right side.[17]

San Jose Sharks[edit]

On November 21, 2014, Dillon was traded to the San Jose Sharks in exchange for defenceman Jason Demers and a third-round pick in the 2016 NHL Entry Draft. At the time of the trade, Dillon had recorded three assists in 20 games.[18] Upon joining the team, Dillon was paired with veteran Brent Burns and returned to his natural playing side.[17][19] Dillon finished the 2014–14 season with the Sharks, recording two goals and seven assists in 60 games. On June 29, 2015, as pending restricted free agent, Dillon signed a five-year, $16.35 million contract extension with San Jose worth an average annual value of $3.27 million per season through to the end of the 2019–20 season.[20] In the first year of his new contract, Dillon recorded 11 points in 79 games.[1]

In his third full season with the Sharks, Dillon broke out offensively and set new career-highs in assists and points.[21] On December 5, 2017, the NHL Department of Player Safety announced that Dillon was suspended one game for slashing Washington Capitals Madison Bowey.[22]

Following the 2018–19 season, Dillon was the recipient of the Sharks' inaugural "Media Good Guy" Award as "a player who handles his media responsibilities with cooperation, honesty, and thoughtfulness, and answers the bell no matter the outcome or situation."[23] He was also the Sharks' nominee for the King Clancy Memorial Trophy as a "National Hockey League player who best exemplifies leadership qualities on and off the ice and who has made a significant humanitarian contribution to his community." His nomination was based on his activism with the Sharks Foundation's Stick To Fitness program and the Sharks Foundation's Blacktop Resurfacing projects.[24]

Washington Capitals[edit]

Following the 2019–20 season, with the Sharks out of playoff contention and playing in the final season of his contract, Dillon was traded to the Washington Capitals in exchange for a 2020 second-round pick and a 2021 conditional third-round pick on February 18, 2020.[25] Upon leaving the Sharks, Dillon ranked ninth in most games in Sharks history and seventh with the most penalty minutes in franchise history.[26] Prior to the trade, Dillon spoke highly of San Jose and emphasized his wish to remain with the team.[27]

On October 6, 2020, Dillon opted to forgo free agency and signed a four-year, $15.6 million contract with the Capitals.[28]

Personal life[edit]

Dillon partnered up with HEROES hockey a non profit organization based out of Western Canada where he is an ambassador. He helped open an additional HEROES office in his hometown of Surrey, British Columbia. |url=https://www.nhlpa.com/news/1-18599/dillon-bd4-hockey-camp-teaching-more-than-a-game}}</ref>

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2006–07 Hope Icebreakers PIJHL 45 4 27 31 38 2 0 0 0 0
2007–08 Seattle Thunderbirds WHL 71 1 10 11 54 12 0 2 2 21
2008–09 Seattle Thunderbirds WHL 70 0 10 10 68 5 0 1 1 6
2009–10 Seattle Thunderbirds WHL 67 2 12 14 101
2010–11 Seattle Thunderbirds WHL 72 8 51 59 139
2010–11 Texas Stars AHL 10 0 0 0 8 6 0 2 2 7
2011–12 Texas Stars AHL 76 6 23 29 97
2011–12 Dallas Stars NHL 1 0 0 0 0
2012–13 Texas Stars AHL 37 3 11 14 45
2012–13 Dallas Stars NHL 48 3 5 8 65
2013–14 Dallas Stars NHL 80 6 11 17 86 2 0 0 0 0
2014–15 Dallas Stars NHL 20 0 1 1 23
2014–15 San Jose Sharks NHL 60 2 7 9 54
2015–16 San Jose Sharks NHL 76 2 9 11 61 24 0 2 2 11
2016–17 San Jose Sharks NHL 81 2 8 10 60 6 0 1 1 4
2017–18 San Jose Sharks NHL 81 5 17 22 60 10 0 4 4 32
2018–19 San Jose Sharks NHL 82 1 21 22 61 20 0 2 2 24
2019–20 San Jose Sharks NHL 59 1 13 14 83
2019–20 Washington Capitals NHL 10 0 0 0 21 8 0 1 1 8
2020–21 Washington Capitals NHL 56 2 17 19 49 5 1 0 1 0
NHL totals 654 24 109 133 623 75 1 10 11 79

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
2013 Canada WC 5th 8 1 0 1 0
Senior totals 8 1 0 1 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Brenden Dillon". eliteprospects.com. Elite Prospects. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  2. ^ Andreville, Troy (April 26, 2018). "Guild members answer call for 'Quilts for Humboldt'". Langley Advance Times. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  3. ^ a b Lomon, Chris (November 13, 2019). "AFTER THE BUZZER: Brenden Dillon". nhlpa.com. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  4. ^ Tappen, Kathryn (October 19, 2013). "Tapped In: Stars' Dillon on his game, musical passion". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  5. ^ a b Ahuja, Gary (February 8, 2013). "Stars align for local d-man with Dallas". Surrey Now Leader. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  6. ^ Lomon, Chris (April 19, 2018). "FROM SEATTLE TO SAN JOSE, DILLON CONTINUES TO GROW". nhlpa.com. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  7. ^ "Dallas Stars sign prospect Brenden Dillon". Dallas Stars. March 1, 2011. Retrieved March 4, 2011.
  8. ^ "Brenden Dillon Joins Texas Stars". seattlethunderbirds.com. March 21, 2011. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  9. ^ "Dallas Assigns Seven Players to Texas Stars". oursportscentral.com. September 28, 2011. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  10. ^ "DALLAS PLACES SOURAY ON IR, RECALLS BRENDEN DILLON". texasstars.com. Texas Stars. January 2, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  11. ^ Stepneski, Mark (April 8, 2012). "Brenden Dillon makes impression in NHL debut". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c "Brenden Dillon". hockeysfuture.com. Hockeys Future. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  13. ^ Stepneski, Mark (February 1, 2013). "Quick Recap: Stars 4, Coyotes 3 (SO)". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  14. ^ "Young defencemen fitting in for Team Canada". Vancouver Sun. May 9, 2013. Retrieved May 23, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "Dallas Stars Sign Defenseman Brenden Dillon To One-Year Contract". nhl.com. October 2, 2014. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  16. ^ Stepneski, Mark (March 2, 2014). "Dillon Practices, Questionable for Monday". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  17. ^ a b Pollak, Pollak (December 8, 2014). "Sharks' Dillon eager to make good impression with new team". Mercury News. Archived from the original on May 2, 2017. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  18. ^ Stepneski, Mark (November 21, 2014). "Stars Continue to Reshape Defense, Acquire Jason Demers from Sharks for Brenden Dillon". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  19. ^ Ziemer, Brad (December 31, 2014). "Surrey's Dillon finds his way to San Jose". Vancouver Sun. Retrieved May 23, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  20. ^ Kurz, Kevin (June 29, 2015). "Brenden Dillon signs 5-year contract extension with Sharks". CSN Bay Area. Archived from the original on July 2, 2015. Retrieved June 29, 2015.
  21. ^ McKeon, Ross (June 10, 2019). "The Dynamic of Dilly". nhl.com. National Hockey League. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  22. ^ Associated Press (December 5, 2017). "Sharks defenceman Brenden Dillon suspended 1 game for slashing". Sportsnet.ca. New York: Sportsnet. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  23. ^ "Brenden Dillon Wins Inaugural "Media Good Guy" Award". nhl.com. National Hockey League. April 6, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  24. ^ "Dillon Nominated for King Clancy Trophy". nhl.com. National Hockey League. April 17, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  25. ^ "Sharks Acquire Two Draft Selections From Capitals for Brenden Dillon". National Hockey League. February 18, 2020.
  26. ^ "Brenden Dillon thanks Sharks fans, San Jose after trade to Capitals". nbcsports.com. NBC Sports. February 19, 2020. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  27. ^ Williams, Thomas (February 17, 2020). "Brenden Dillon gets emotional over possibility of final game as Shark". sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  28. ^ "Capitals sign Brenden Dillon". Washington Capitals. October 6, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.

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